A few last questions about routering and sonotube?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by HungLe, Dec 18, 2002.

  1. HungLe

    HungLe Agent

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    I got myself a Ryobi fixed base router and made a circle guide for it based on Warrick's. Anyways, I have never used a router before so can you guys give pointers? I read that the direction that I thrust the router varies with each router.
    My manual says "the motor and bit revolve in a clockwise direction and it tells me to thrust the router in the same direction that the leading edge of the bit is moving or in short, the thrust should be in a direction that keeps the sharp edges of the bit continuously biting straight into new (uncut) wood."
    What does all that mean in plain english?

    Also how do I go about cutting into the wood exactly. The manual tells me how to set the base zero depth of cut when the cutter is touching the wood and how to increase the depth but not clear on how I actually go about cutting/feeding the wood.
    I know I have to take several passes but do I say start with 1/8 inch set deep into the surface or drill a hole before?

    And last question not router related is where can I get those black farbric that goes over the tube? What are they called?
     
  2. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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    If the bit turns clockwise and you have the router on the edge of a piece of wood with the router between you and the wood, you would move from left to right. If the router is on the back edge of the wood with the wood between you and the router, you would move the router right to left.
    Here is the best analogy I can think of. You do not want the router bit and wood to be like a wheel against the road. You want the bit and wood to be like the wheel of a car that is being pushed forward while it is in reverse with the wheels spinning backwards against the road. You want to push the bit into the cut. OK, thats a stupid analogy... [​IMG]
    I am not really sure about circle cutting because the bit is cutting both sides, the hole and the circle that is cut out. My DeWalt plunge router with a spiral up-cut bit that also spins clockwise, cuts better if I rotate the router in a clockwise motion for the cutout.
    I have never tried to plunge a fixed base router so I cannot help with that question. But I make 2 passes with my plunge router using a 1/4 spiral up-cut bit cutting through 3/4 MDF. Actually the last few holes I have cut, I made 3 passes because my bit is stating to get a little dull. I use a very slow feed rate and take my time.
    Hope you're not more confused now...
    Ronnie
     
  3. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Where's that damn picture I used to have! [​IMG] To make it a little more simple, for circle cutting in the middle of a piece of material, move the router clockwise. If you are working on the outside edge of a piece of material, move the router counter-clockwise.
     
  4. HungLe

    HungLe Agent

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    Brian,

    So should I adjust the router to be at zero level at the right radius from the center, turn it on, and dial it down to 1/8 inch, then go clockwise? My router is not a plunge router.
     
  5. Jeff Meininger

    Jeff Meininger Second Unit

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    About that tube fabric: most people use what's called "ribbing" material. It is stretchy cotton, and is often used to make collars on T-shirts. I had a VERY hard time finding this stuff. Fabric stores (hancock, joann, hobby lobby, wal-mart) only had it in a too-small diameter, so I started going to mom-and-pop specialty sewing shops. I finally found the stuff. I only found it in white, though, and I had to dye it to my desired color.
    http://boxybutgood.com/temp/sonosub/SubDayFinal-011.jpg
     
  6. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    I'd think you'd need to drill a pilot hole slightly larger in diameter than your bit and then use that as your starting point. Adjust your depth down about 1/4" for each pass.

    Just keep in mind that you don't want the hole to be outside of the circle you're trying to cut or you will have a notch when you are finished.
     
  7. Eduardo

    Eduardo Agent

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