77 Sunset Strip / Hawaiian Eye, etc.

Tom.W

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As Pamela Myers, anti-war activist, she proves that she has brains to match her beauty...her suspicions aroused by an old collectible book with strange mathematical formulas tucked inside that she finds in Dr. Bilson's cabin...she knows enough about codes and codebreaking that she rightfully suspects the book is the 'Key' to unlocking the strange mathematical code written in Bilson's hand..
Excellent review of The Missile Rogues, Randall! I wonder if Joan Marshall's character was inspired by Hedy Lamarr, who in addition to being a knockout Hollywood star, invented a coding system capable of blocking German forces from intercepting Allied submarine torpedoes. Apparently, she used her status as trophy wife of a munitions dealer to gain access to Nazi planning sessions. The technology she invented has been employed in wifi and cell phones.

I watched The Broken Thread over the weekend, a strong fourth season episode IMHO. Grant Williams takes the lead in this one, and it features an unusual Latin number by Cricket, judging by the standards she often sings. Fun to see Andrew Duggan playing against type a couple of years after Bourbon Street Beat and a nice payoff at the end.
 

Ree

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Excellent review of The Missile Rogues, Randall! I wonder if Joan Marshall's character was inspired by Hedy Lamarr, who in addition to being a knockout Hollywood star, invented a coding system capable of blocking German forces from intercepting Allied submarine torpedoes. Apparently, she used her status as trophy wife of a munitions dealer to gain access to Nazi planning sessions. The technology she invented has been employed in wifi and cell phones.

I watched The Broken Thread over the weekend, a strong fourth season episode IMHO. Grant Williams takes the lead in this one, and it features an unusual Latin number by Cricket, judging by the standards she often sings. Fun to see Andrew Duggan playing against type a couple of years after Bourbon Street Beat and a nice payoff at the end.
Interesting actress, Hedy Lamarr! When I first heard about her inventions and patents I remember researching her - it's true, but the thing that surprised me most was that, while a Google search yields easily a hundred photos of her, there's nary a one of her smiling. I hope her many attributes included a sense of humor.

Speaking of humor, I especially loved Cricket's novelty songs, of which two had a So. American theme. Both were written in '46, when all things Cuban and So. American were quite the craze. The one in Broken Thread was "South America Take it Away". The other, in Danger on Credit, was "Rainy Night in Rio". I always thought it unfortunate that Connie didn't continue recording longer, as the Brazilian samba music of that time, and even of today, seemed perfect for her voice. FWIW, Joanie Sommers, another WB singing starlet who had the dubious honor of singing with Kookie, did record an album of such music. I guess it wasn't a huge hit in the mid 60's, but it remains one of my all-time favorites. But, I digress......
 

Jeff Flugel

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Hawaiian Eye, Missile Rogues (Jan. 3, 1962) continued...

Joan Marshall, aged 30 at the time of this episode, is truly stunning...a former showgirl, she was in many of the WB series, William Castle's cult film Homicidal, the TV series Bold Venture, I Spy, Bonanza, Dr. Kildare, Star Trek among others...as the wife of producer/director Hal Ashby, it's said that her life was the licentious basis for the Oscar winning 1975 film Shampoo starring Warren Beatty, Goldie Hawn and Julie Christie...something that she was unhappy about...
Another wonderful two-part review of what sounds like a fun episode of Hawaiian Eye, Randall! I mostly recognize Joan Marshall (in slightly older but still lovely form) from the excellent original Star Trek episode "Court Martial." Need to check out more of her TV work, which is extensive.

 
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Gary16

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Interesting actress, Hedy Lamarr! When I first heard about her inventions and patents I remember researching her - it's true, but the thing that surprised me most was that, while a Google search yields easily a hundred photos of her, there's nary a one of her smiling. I hope her many attributes included a sense of humor.

Speaking of humor, I especially loved Cricket's novelty songs, of which two had a So. American theme. Both were written in '46, when all things Cuban and So. American were quite the craze. The one in Broken Thread was "South America Take it Away". The other, in Danger on Credit, was "Rainy Night in Rio". I always thought it unfortunate that Connie didn't continue recording longer, as the Brazilian samba music of that time, and even of today, seemed perfect for her voice. FWIW, Joanie Sommers, another WB singing starlet who had the dubious honor of singing with Kookie, did record an album of such music. I guess it wasn't a huge hit in the mid 60's, but it remains one of my all-time favorites. But, I digress......
It was Connie who recorded with Edd “Kookie” Byrnes although Kookie is the one who got Joanie the gig at Dino’s in the episode “Collector’s Item.”
 

Tom.W

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nteresting actress, Hedy Lamarr! When I first heard about her inventions and patents I remember researching her - it's true, but the thing that surprised me most was that, while a Google search yields easily a hundred photos of her, there's nary a one of her smiling. I hope her many attributes included a sense of humor.
Noteworthy that Marlene Dietrich's career kind of paralled Hedy's insofar as she traveled in Europe entertaining the troops, sometimes close to enemy territory, during WWII. She was "another one that got away." German authorities tried to entice her back with an offer for a movie contract. Unlike Hedy, it's not too hard to find pictures of her smiling. Below are a couple:

Thanks for the backstory on "South America Take it Away". Anne. I figured you would know about that!

I always thought it unfortunate that Connie didn't continue recording longer, as the Brazilian samba music of that time, and even of today, seemed perfect for her voice. FWIW, Joanie Sommers, another WB singing starlet who had the dubious honor of singing with Kookie, did record an album of such music.
Are you referring to Softly, the Brazilian Sound (with Laurindo Almeida)? That's on my car cd player. For Those Who Think Young is another one l like.
Dietrich_Cooper[1].jpg
Marlene_Dietrich[1].jpg
 
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Ree

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It was Connie who recorded with Edd “Kookie” Byrnes although Kookie is the one who got Joanie the gig at Dino’s in the episode “Collector’s Item.”
True, it was Connie on "Lend me Your Comb", but Joanie did "Kookie's Love Song", "Hot Rod Rock", and "I Don't Dig You, Kookie", all understandably forgettable. I heard Joanie interviewed once and she said that, yes, those were a little embarrassing, but she is most sorry that she will forever be associated with that opus encouraging domestic abuse, "Johnny Get Angry". I admit to having bought that one, as a young teen - what was I thinking?!
 

Rustifer

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I heard Joanie interviewed once and she said that, yes, those were a little embarrassing, but she is most sorry that she will forever be associated with that opus encouraging domestic abuse, "Johnny Get Angry".
Oh, many thanks for reminding me of Johnny Get Angry. I remember dorkishly listening to this ditty on my transistor radio while riding to and from school on the bus. Joanie Sommers' voice just sent shivers through me--a perfect pop vocalist for 1962. Although never one of Hal David's outstanding achievements in lyrics, still...I wanted to be a brave man, a cave man and show Joanie that I cared--really cared--for her.

1603365074571.png

I wonder how many pop songs premiered for me through this little device when I was growing up? To this day I still recall the smell of the plastic casing and the tinny sound emanating from its mini speaker. Transistor radios, Bazooka bubble gum, penny loafers, 77 Sunset Strip--oh where have you gone, my 1960s?
 
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Ree

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Oh, many thanks for reminding me of Johnny Get Angry. I remember dorkishly listening to this ditty on my transistor radio while riding to and from school on the bus. Joanie Sommers' voice just sent shivers through me--a perfect pop vocalist for 1962. Although never one of Hal David's outstanding achievements in lyrics, still...I wanted to be a brave man, a cave man and show Joanie that I cared--really cared--for her.

View attachment 80615
I wonder how many pop songs premiered for me through this little device when I was growing up? To this day I still recall the smell of the plastic casing and the tinny sound emanating from its mini speaker. Transistor radios, Bazooka bubble gum, penny loafers, 77 Sunset Strip--oh where have you gone, my 1960s?
Before I even finished reading your comment I knew I'd have to comment about the memorable smell of my little radio. To this day, when I unbox a new electronic "toy", I recall slipping it out of its leather case and breathing in that wonderful aroma. Speaking of Joanie's voice, I'll bet it's no accident that she was chosen to sell Pepsi, "for those who think young". Probably market research had predicted its effect on young men.
 

Rustifer

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Before I even finished reading your comment I knew I'd have to comment about the memorable smell of my little radio.
Isn't it funny how some smells throw you right back into your childhood? Burning leaves in October, Grandma's pot roast on a Sunday afternoon, sheets hanging on a clothes line in the back yard that you run through chasing a ball...
I could probably think of more examples, but right now I'm too tired. At 7:00 pm, it's getting too close to bedtime for this old nostalgic guy.
Keep sharing your great insights you bring to this thread.
 

Flashgear

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Excellent review of The Missile Rogues, Randall! I wonder if Joan Marshall's character was inspired by Hedy Lamarr, who in addition to being a knockout Hollywood star, invented a coding system capable of blocking German forces from intercepting Allied submarine torpedoes. Apparently, she used her status as trophy wife of a munitions dealer to gain access to Nazi planning sessions. The technology she invented has been employed in wifi and cell phones.
Thank you Tom! You brought up an interesting parallel that had not occurred to me. Although I think the fact that Hedy Lamarr's shared patent for 'frequency hopping' transmitting and jamming wasn't as well known in 1962 as it would be in more recent years. When I first heard about Hedy Lamarr's involvement with such hi-tech inventions, I first thought it must be exaggerated. But recent books and the recent documentary 'Bombshell' have established this as fact, although her collaborator was also instrumental in developing the concept. And both were essentially cheated out of benefitting with their patent by it's wide-spread late war application by the US Navy and our allies without payment. Their technical innovation basically became public domain.

Joan Marshall made quite an impression on me while watching The Missile Rogues. Beyond her obvious beauty, I thought she was a very good actress. I went on a little bit of a viewing marathon of her work in movies and TV, which further cemented my appreciation of her acting abilities, especially in another episode of Bourbon Street Beat (Last Exit), Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer (Play Belle's Toll) The FBI (The Insolents) and William Castle's 1961 movie shocker Homicidal.
I watched The Broken Thread over the weekend, a strong fourth season episode IMHO. Grant Williams takes the lead in this one, and it features an unusual Latin number by Cricket, judging by the standards she often sings. Fun to see Andrew Duggan playing against type a couple of years after Bourbon Street Beat and a nice payoff at the end.
It's a great episode, isn't it Tom? Featuring one of the best pre-credit 'teasers' ever, and as you say, a memorable payoff at the end. In my classic TV watching, Andrew Duggan is always welcome. Great work throughout his career, just one thing that comes to mind for me is his fine work in QM's 12 O'clock High as General Britt. Man, nobody was better at presenting a commanding presence. His rather shocking bad guy in The Broken Thread (who literally has the last laugh) was a nice change of pace. Perhaps I need to do a post on that one too. At least my copy (from 16mm) is much better than for Missile Rogues.
Interesting actress, Hedy Lamarr! When I first heard about her inventions and patents I remember researching her - it's true, but the thing that surprised me most was that, while a Google search yields easily a hundred photos of her, there's nary a one of her smiling. I hope her many attributes included a sense of humor.
Anne, have you seen the recent documentary on Hedy Lamarr, Bombshell? It has aired on PBS, and I imagine is available on the streaming platforms. A very well-done documentary with fascinating detail, I recommend it highly. Despite her otherwise stern Germanic/Austrian persona, her delightful laugh and self-deprecating humor is evident in archival audio interviews which are featured throughout Bombshell.
Speaking of humor, I especially loved Cricket's novelty songs, of which two had a So. American theme. Both were written in '46, when all things Cuban and So. American were quite the craze. The one in Broken Thread was "South America Take it Away". The other, in Danger on Credit, was "Rainy Night in Rio". I always thought it unfortunate that Connie didn't continue recording longer, as the Brazilian samba music of that time, and even of today, seemed perfect for her voice. FWIW, Joanie Sommers, another WB singing starlet who had the dubious honor of singing with Kookie, did record an album of such music. I guess it wasn't a huge hit in the mid 60's, but it remains one of my all-time favorites. But, I digress......
Very interesting background info there, Anne. You obviously know a lot about the WB shows, stars, and their era. Your posts have enriched this thread tremendously. Please continue to do so!
Another wonderful two-part review of what sounds like a fun episode of Hawaiian Eye, Randall! I mostly recognize Joan Marshall (in slightly older but still lovely form) from the excellent original Star Trek episode "Court Martial." Need to check out more of her TV work, which is extensive.
Thank you Jeff! We have to find a way to get these WB detective shows to you. I know you have an extensive collection of the WB Westerns already. Your delightfully incisive and informative reviews of your viewings in the HTF 'What did you watch in classic TV' thread have been a joy, as is your archived blog.

About Joan Marshall, I believe you have the Darren McGavin 1958-60 Mike Hammer, and she is among the many lovelies featured in that series too. And any girl who was in the original Star Trek has to have a special place in our classic TV hearts!
Oh, many thanks for reminding me of Johnny Get Angry. I remember dorkishly listening to this ditty on my transistor radio while riding to and from school on the bus. Joanie Sommers' voice just sent shivers through me--a perfect pop vocalist for 1962. Although never one of Hal David's outstanding achievements in lyrics, still...I wanted to be a brave man, a cave man and show Joanie that I cared--really cared--for her.

View attachment 80615
I wonder how many pop songs premiered for me through this little device when I was growing up? To this day I still recall the smell of the plastic casing and the tinny sound emanating from its mini speaker. Transistor radios, Bazooka bubble gum, penny loafers, 77 Sunset Strip--oh where have you gone, my 1960s?
Russ, you evoke so many long subdued and dimly held memories of transistor radios long lost in the back of a drawer, as mine was until recently. It was a hand-me-down from my older brother, also encased in it's custom brown leather jacket. A marvel of Japanese ingenuity. I remember holding it for hours at a time, late at night while in bed, with it's earphone burning a hole in my ear, listening to the top 40, the hit singles from The Beatles' Rubber Soul , Smoky Robinson and the Miracles' Going to a Go-Go, The Beach Boy's Pet Sounds etc.,
 

Flashgear

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So, after being blown away by my recent viewing of Hawaiian Eye's The Missile Rogues and the appearance of a very lovely Joan Marshall, I embarked upon a little bit of a viewing marathon of her work on such shows as Bourbon Street Beat, 77 Sunset Strip, Maverick, Dr. Kildare, Harbor Command, Tombstone Territory, I Spy, The F.B.I., Laredo, and Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer...despite the fuzzy screen caps I posted here recently from The Missile Rogues, Joan Marshall's lovely self was still very evident...but I thought I owed posterity some of my screen caps of her taken from sharper sources...

In Bourbon Street Beat's Last Exit (May 2, 1960), Joan Marshall plays a Jeweler's runaway daughter whom Rex Randolph has been hired to track down in the South American country of San Marco. Perhaps the mythic San Marco borders on 77 Sunset Strip's San Dede, and if so, perhaps they waged one of those Soccer wars with each other that we used to hear about, ha, ha...I'd like Jack Warner and these WB script writers to take my old grade 7 geography test...The runaway daughter, may, or may not, still be in revengeful pursuit of her brother's killer, played by the usual slick and oily Ray Danton. Problem is, Rex soon discovers he has been misled... the runaway girl is singing in a night club owned by her brother's alleged killer, and very much in love with him! The lovely Madlyn Rhue is also in this one. I'll do a more extensive review soon (and I need to look back in this thread to see if Russ has already done one of his wonderful reviews on this episode?)...

It appears that Joan Marshall actually sings two tunes in this episode...It Can't Be Wrong (1942, music by Max Steiner, lyrics by Kim Gannon and first heard in the iconic Bette Davis film Now Voyager) and You And The Night And Music (1934, music by Arthur Schwartz, lyrics by Howard Dietz, from the Broadway show Revenge With Music) At first I considered that she might have been over-dubbed, but seeing as she was a former Vegas showgirl, and thus likely to be both a talented singer and dancer, and the fact that our own HTF member 'Cadavra' (Mike S.), who apparently is responsible (with thanks) for annotating on IMDB the music heard in the WB detective series, says that she did in fact sing these two songs...my screen caps from homemade DVD...
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Joan Marshall 65.JPG

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Also early on in her career, Joan Marshall appeared in Darren McGavin's Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer, Play Belle's Toll (May 9, 1958)...here she plays a desperate young girl, working as a "gentleman's escort", now fearful of the violent extortioners running their shakedowns of NYC's social elite in partnership with a Park Avenue dowager gone-to-seed...Joan Marshall delivers a fine, genuine and affecting performance in this one...my screen caps from the great A+E DVD complete series set...
Joan Marshall 11.JPG

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The F.B.I. S1E5, The Insolents (Oct. 17, 1965)...along with the photo that Jeff posted of her appearance in Star Trek, a peak at what she looked like in color...Joan Marshall plays a co-conspirator to extortion, but an unwilling accomplice to murder on a cruise ship...now fearful and emotionally torn at the horror of the murder that she hadn't planned on---as the FBI investigates (our own Efrem Zimbalist Jr. of 77 Sunset Strip naturally)...Joan is terrific in this one...my screen caps from the Warner Archive DVDs...
Joan Marshall 39.JPG

Joan Marshall 41.JPG

Joan Marshall 45.JPG

Joan Marshall 46.JPG

Joan Marshall 50.JPG
 
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Flashgear

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Thanks John for posting that episode of Bold Venture! I'm going to watch it soon! Love the 'Vitalis' commercial too. I know that I have about 3 episodes of mostly crappy quality somewhere in my many boxes o' treasures. This one I believe is one of them, but I haven't seen them in years. Over the years, I have found the ZIV Bold Venture syndicated TV series to be hard-to-find. The excellent 1951 Humphrey Bogart/Lauren Bacall Radio episodes are way easier to find. My attempts at collecting the TV show were complicated by the confusion of another 1950s syndicated 30 minute TV series with a similar title, Bold Journey. That series was a documentary type show with a host/narrator, a good show too, but a real disappointment when receiving them from another collector/dealer when I thought I was getting ZIV's 1959 Bold Venture. Perhaps Gary has had more luck in tracking these down? Back when Timeless, Shout! and TGG Direct were releasing so many great old ZIV series, I really expected that Bold Venture would be one of them, I have the feeling that we just missed out on getting it, if only some of the other shows had perhaps sold better on DVD. Oh, well.


What fun to have found a bunch of people who know who Joan Marshal was! But, I notice no one has yet mentioned the ZIV series, Bold Venture. Anyone?
Anne, I did find these publicity photos, trade paper ads and 1959 TV Guide color spread for Bold Venture...
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Joan Marshall and Richard Chamberlain in the gossip columns, 1966. Joan did 2 episodes of the fifth and final year of Dr. Kildare...
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Joan appeared in nearly all of the WB TV Westerns and Detective shows, Maverick, Lawman, Bronco, Roaring '20s, Bourbon Street Beat, Surfside 6, Hawaiian Eye, 77 Sunset Strip and The F.B.I.
 

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Ree

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Thanks John for posting that episode of Bold Venture! I'm going to watch it soon! Love the 'Vitalis' commercial too. I know that I have about 3 episodes of mostly crappy quality somewhere in my many boxes o' treasures. This one I believe is one of them, but I haven't seen them in years. Over the years, I have found the ZIV Bold Venture syndicated TV series to be hard-to-find. The excellent 1951 Humphrey Bogart/Lauren Bacall Radio episodes are way easier to find. My attempts at collecting the TV show were complicated by the confusion of another 1950s syndicated 30 minute TV series with a similar title, Bold Journey. That series was a documentary type show with a host/narrator, a good show too, but a real disappointment when receiving them from another collector/dealer when I thought I was getting ZIV's 1959 Bold Venture. Perhaps Gary has had more luck in tracking these down? Back when Timeless, Shout! and TGG Direct were releasing so many great old ZIV series, I really expected that Bold Venture would be one of them, I have the feeling that we just missed out on getting it, if only some of the other shows had perhaps sold better on DVD. Oh, well.



Anne, I did find these publicity photos, trade paper ads and 1959 TV Guide color spread for Bold Venture...
View attachment 80718
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Joan Marshall and Richard Chamberlain in the gossip columns, 1966. Joan did 2 episodes of the fifth and final year of Dr. Kildare...
View attachment 80730
View attachment 80731

Joan appeared in nearly all of the WB TV Westerns and Detective shows, Maverick, Lawman, Bronco, Roaring '20s, Bourbon Street Beat, Surfside 6, Hawaiian Eye, 77 Sunset Strip and The F.B.I.
Yes, I do remember that TV Guide article, but thanks for posting the photos - hadn't seen many of them.
What did you think of Bold Venture?
I had just discovered island fantasies when it aired here - was swept away by the music, the set decor, King Moses, and the blonde pony-tailed role model for 11 year old me - but I still sensed something wrong with the whole premise. I couldn't figure out why Sailor didn't have a job, or go to school - "ward" wasn't a profession, was it? And why was Slate always so mean to her? LOL
As an adult I enjoy watching ZIV shows precisely because they were so awful - Highway Patrol is a dumbed down Dragnet, Mr. District Attorney an anemic Perry Mason, Klondike a tepid Alaskans, and so on.
But BV still holds a special place just because of the exotic world it opened for me the first time I saw it. Unless I'm mistaken, the episodes weren't named. I know I've acquired the same ones with different titles over the years. I think there are about 37 -39 episodes in all, but the 10 or 12 I have seem to be the only ones in circulation.
Wouldn't it be fun to have heard an interview with Joan Marshall? She seems to have worked with everyone and done it all! And, she retired to an island (Jamaica).
 

criblecoblis

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The lefty used his fastball and screwball combination to strike out nine Orioles at Dodger Stadium in the stadium’s inaugural season, where the Angels shared home games with the Dodgers from 1962 to 1965.
We Angel fans referred to it as "Chavez Ravine," which is the stadium's geographic location. Nowadays, we call it "Chavez Latrine," because of its frequent plumbing problems.
 

criblecoblis

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Now, fellows, you've made me want to have another look at BSB. When it gets too cold to play outside I'll have to go thru the "stacks" in my guest room closet and see if I still have any.
For what it's worth, I love the show once it gets its sea legs, around episode 11. Yes, it's flawed and somewhat miscast, but there are some wonderful moments.
 

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