77 Sunset Strip / Hawaiian Eye, etc.

Rustifer

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As I believe was mentioned earlier BSB also faced some tough competition being opposite FATHER KNOWS BEST, PETER GUNN and THE DANNY THOMAS SHOW which were all established shows. And with an 8:30 start compared to 9:00 for 77 and HE, that may have also contributed to the lower ratings.
Gary, I agree with you that the series had tough competition in that time slot. But still, it just didn't have the razzle dazzle to sustain interest.
I maintain that had it featured the New Orleans location more, it might have gained increased aura--as was the case with Hawaiian Eye and Surfside 6--even though all were mostly filmed in the Burbank studios.
 
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Flashgear

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With Hurricane season underway (with hopefully limited damage to come), I decided to dip back into Bourbon Street Beat and watch the series final episode, Teresa (July 4, 1960) D: William J. Hole, Script: W. Hermanos, from a story by Whitman Chambers. Guest cast: Marie Windsor, Andra Martin, Karen Steele, Brad Dexter, Robert J. Wilke, John Beradino, Richard Rust, Gary Conway, Gary Vinson...an extraordinarily fine cast of familiar faces, both of the thug and lovely kind, in a story reminiscent of the same studio's famous noir, Key Largo...although surprisingly in a very pleasant way, this episode's story stands on it's own, enabled by good pacing and the considerable talent of the leads and guest stars...

Rich kid Brad Dennison (Richard Rust), in debt big time to Casino owner Mara (Marie Windsor), and in desperate love for the older vamp, journeys by boat to Mara's private island in the Mississippi river delta to make good on the money he owes her...Mara is receptive, but just after Brad hands over the 5 grand, he's cold-cocked with a blackjack by an unseen assailant, Joe Komack ( John Beradino)...one of Mara's secret houseguests, and bank-robbing partner to her other guest, Mark Comden (Brad Dexter)...the nefarious duo is on the run with a cool quarter million, and looking to fly out by floatplane to Mexico or some such place, before a powerful hurricane (Teresa, herself) comes ashore...a down-on-her-luck alcoholic Hollywood actress, Barbara Komack (Karen Steele), disaffected wife of thug Joe, has somehow landed in the midst of this trouble...Mara's handyman Morey (epic tough guy Robert J. Wilke), locks up Brad in a shed until the floatplane pilot can spirit the fugitives away...

Meanwhile, back at the Bourbon Street Detective agency, Brad's sister Jan (Andra Martin ) pleads with Rex Randolph (Richard Long) to take her down the big muddy to Mara's island in a bid to rescue her hostage brother before the Hurricane comes ashore...things start to go awry for Mara and her gangster houseguests as Teresa changes course and picks up steam, heading straight for the island...whereupon the pilot (Gary Vinson) cashes out...warned by a phone call with the local Coast Guard officer (Gary Conway) they must now ride out the powerful hurricane and it's 20 foot storm surge, while the gunman turn on each other...just as Rex Randolph and Jan Dennison arrive in search of her missing brother Brad...my screen caps from home made DVD derived from old Starz broadcast...
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Continued next post...
 

Flashgear

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Bourbon Street Beat episode 39, Teresa (July 4, 1960) cont'd...

As the powerful hurricane Teresa bears down on the island, Mara (Marie Windsor), her "houseguest" bank-robbers with their $250,000 take (Brad Dexter, John Beradino, Karen Steele), along with Mara's accidental hostage (Richard Rust) and Mara's caretaker (Robert J. Wilke) prepare to ride out the hurricane's reported 20 foot storm surge by taking refuge in the island's colonial-era fort...just as Rex Randolph (Richard Long) and Jan Dennison (Andra Martin) arrive by boat in search of the girl's missing brother...if that isn't enough, the jumpy gunman begin to turn on each other in a winner-take-all drama to have the bundle to themselves...

Richard Long with the impressive Karen Steele...
BSB 51.JPG


Brad Dexter...
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The lovely Andra Martin...when this episode first aired, she had just recently divorced husband Ty Hardin (Bronco)...
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Marie Windsor with Richard Long...
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A fearful John Beradino...
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A settling of scores...
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As Teresa's powerful winds break upon the island, Warner's wind and rain machine really gets a workout in a very impressive storm sequence as the surviving cast takes refuge in the colonial fort...
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Wouldn't ya know it? Brad Dexter's ill-gotten loot takes flight into Teresa's storm-tossed wrath...
BSB 68.JPG


The cast is really punished in this impressive WB "hurricane", and left soaked to their skin...to me, particularly welcomed in the case of Andra Martin, Karen Steele and Marie Windsor...the latter perhaps revealing far more than was intended for the TV audiences of 1960...ha, ha...
BSB 69.JPG


The WB wind machine has clearly even exceeded Richard Long's Brylcream tolerances!
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Richard Rust and Andra Martin...
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Robert J. Wilke and Marie Windsor...now soaked to her skin, with some transparency now developing in a revealing way...undoubtedly less obvious in the Analog broadcasting era on a 21" TV...
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The usually immaculately groomed Richard Long, proving that even Brylcream has it's limits...
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Well, back to the comfortable Bourbon Street environs of the Absinthe House...where partner Cal Calhoun (Andrew Duggan) get's an update on Rex's latest adventure...
BSB 90.JPG


Wow, Richard Long is a chain-smoker par excellance...
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The final scene and a light-hearted farewell to a series that ended too soon...Rex Randolph himself would find a soft landing, at least for awhile, on 77 Sunset Strip...Andrew Duggan would continue as a frequent guest star on the Warner shows, even reprising his 'Cal Calhoun' character, now returned to the New Orleans police department in the 77 Sunset Strip season four episode, Upbeat...co-star Van William's character Kenny Madison would set up shop on Surfside 6...
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Marie Windsor, 'Queen of the B's' (Narrow Margin, The Killing, The Sniper, Trouble Along the Way and over a hundred TV credits), a former Miss Utah and a Mormon girl gone bad, was also a director of the Screen Actor's Guild for 25 years...Hawaiian born Karen Steele (Marty, Ride Lonesome), a frequent guest star in the WB shows, is fondly remembered by Star Trek fandom as one of Mudd's Women...lovely Andra Martin, another frequent WB player (Up Periscope, Yellowstone Kelly, Fever in the Blood, The Lady Takes a Flyer), also appeared in nearly every WB Western and Detective series of this era...among many other things, Brad Dexter and Robert J. Wilke would both appear in John Sturge's The Magnificent Seven later in 1960...another of Brad Dexter's claims to fame was saving Frank Sinatra from drowning off Hawaii in May 1964...a close friend of Sinatra's, he told author Anthony Summers (Sinatra: The Life) that he witnessed Sinatra making a million dollar payoff during the 1960 election campaign in a bid to help JFK win the election...John Beradino had a successful 12 year career in MLB with the St. Louis Browns, Pittsburgh Pirates and Cleveland Indians with whom he was part of the 1948 World Series winning team...he would soon co-star as a good guy with Leslie Nielsen in Quinn Martin's first TV series production, The New Breed...he would later have a long run (1963-1996) on the Soap General Hospital...Richard Rust would soon co-star with Edmund O'Brien in the series Sam Benedict...Gary Vinson would soon join the crew of PT-73 on McHale's Navy...Gary Conway would soon co-star with Gene Barry on Burke's Law, and eventually Irwin Allen's Land of the Giants...like I said, a cast top-to-bottom of very familiar faces...and a very entertaining episode as well!
 

Rustifer

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With Hurricane season underway (with hopefully limited damage to come), I decided to dip back into Bourbon Street Beat and watch the series final episode, Teresa (July 4, 1960)
Great review, Randall. I did a commentary on this episode back on Nov. 18 last year. Yours is far better and more comprehensive.
I thought this episode was one of the better entries in the series.
 

Flashgear

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Great review, Randall. I did a commentary on this episode back on Nov. 18 last year. Yours is far better and more comprehensive.
I thought this episode was one of the better entries in the series.
Thanks, Russ! It is a very entertaining episode, and a fine send-off for the series. I mean, what a cast! And the impressively staged storm sequence is memorably spectacular. I'm grateful that they produced 39 episodes, and were thus able to air this final episode first-run as late as the July 4 weekend of 1960!

I try to emulate, in a humble way, your affectionately humorous take on these shows. I imagine your source for Bourbon Street Beat is the same as mine, from old Goodlife and Starz airings 15 to 20+ years ago. When I was still collecting films, this series was exceedingly rare or non-existent in film trading circles. So when Goodlife/Americanlife and Starz showed them way back when, it was a godsend.
 

Rustifer

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Thanks, Russ! It is a very entertaining episode, and a fine send-off for the series. I mean, what a cast! And the impressively staged storm sequence is memorably spectacular. I'm grateful that they produced 39 episodes, and were thus able to air this final episode first-run as late as the July 4 weekend of 1960!

I try to emulate, in a humble way, your affectionately humorous take on these shows. I imagine your source for Bourbon Street Beat is the same as mine, from old Goodlife and Starz airings 15 to 20+ years ago. When I was still collecting films, this series was exceedingly rare or non-existent in film trading circles. So when Goodlife/Americanlife and Starz showed them way back when, it was a godsend.
I was sent a thumb drive with 10 or 15 BSB eps---all in pretty sharp visual shape. I have no idea how or where they were copied-- just thankful I have them.
 

Jeff Flugel

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Great, epic two-part review, Randall! This looks like a cracking episode...right up my street, as I love Key Largo and "caught in a big storm" scenarios in movies and TV shows.

I have to say, also, that of all the (admittedly limited) WB detective shows that I have seen, Bourbon Street Beat is the most appealing - thanks mainly to the leads, Richard Long and Andrew Duggan, two reliable charismatic, smooth performers. This is not to disparage the others shows...I like what I've seen of them, too. But BSB is the one I have taken to the quickest.
 

Flashgear

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Great, epic two-part review, Randall! This looks like a cracking episode...right up my street, as I love Key Largo and "caught in a big storm" scenarios in movies and TV shows.

I have to say, also, that of all the (admittedly limited) WB detective shows that I have seen, Bourbon Street Beat is the most appealing - thanks mainly to the leads, Richard Long and Andrew Duggan, two reliable charismatic, smooth performers. This is not to disparage the others shows...I like what I've seen of them, too. But BSB is the one I have taken to the quickest.
Thank you Jeff! As you have seen some of the episodes, I can assure you that you would like most of Bourbon Street Beat, which definitely mined the 'Jazz detective' vibe effectively. Something of a 'thing' back in the late 50s and early 60s with other P.I. shows like Johnny Staccato, Peter Gunn and Dan Raven (with Skip Homeier as the P.I.!) Same good stuff with 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye and Surfside 6. I really love the music in BSB, a real asset for a show set in NOLA. As with the other Private Eye TV series of the era, such as Mike Hammer, Coronado 9, Johnny Staccato, Mr. Lucky and Peter Gunn that we were lucky to get on DVD, all these series find the same well tread formulaic trails, but enriched by the appealing chemistry of their recurring lead characters. A number of unmemorable outings along the way, and some outright duds. But plenty of great episodes and solid entertainment too. WB had a proven and highly successful template for their Westerns and Detective shows.

Anybody who loves 77 Sunset Strip (and all the WB shows) should check out the lively Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/groups/82135408066/media
There's plenty of great pictures and videos posted there almost daily and it's an open group, so joining is optional. Here's a great photo just posted today: Edd Byrnes and Roger Smith goofing around together on the WB lot...
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Tom.W

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Thank you Jeff! As you have seen some of the episodes, I can assure you that you would like most of Bourbon Street Beat, which definitely mined the 'Jazz detective' vibe effectively. Something of a 'thing' back in the late 50s and early 60s with other P.I. shows like Johnny Staccato, Peter Gunn and Dan Raven (with Skip Homeier as the P.I.!) Same good stuff with 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye and Surfside 6. I really love the music in BSB, a real asset for a show set in NOLA. As with the other Private Eye TV series of the era, such as Mike Hammer, Coronado 9, Johnny Staccato, Mr. Lucky and Peter Gunn that we were lucky to get on DVD, all these series find the same well tread formulaic trails, but enriched by the appealing chemistry of their recurring lead characters. A number of unmemorable outings along the way, and some outright duds. But plenty of great episodes and solid entertainment too. WB had a proven and highly successful template for their Westerns and Detective shows.
Randall, I agree with you about the music in BSB. One of my favorite episodes is the pilot, "A Taste of Ashes." It's strong plot-wise and gets off to a rollicking start thanks to Eddie Cole's great piano. For anyone who didn't know, Eddie was Nat's brother. I wish the series had made greater use of Eddie's talents similarly to the the way singers or musicians were employed on the other Warner shows, e.g., the Frankie Ortega Trio on 77SS.

While attending a conference in New Orleans many years ago, I made a point of checking out the Absinthe House. Not surprisingly, the sign is much smaller than it appears in the opening credits. The establishment was offset from other storefronts on the corner of Bienville and Bourbon streets.

I liked when Rex Randolph's homemade gumbo made an appearance. I always got hungry seeing that!
 

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Randall, I agree with you about the music in BSB. One of my favorite episodes is the pilot, "A Taste of Ashes." It's strong plot-wise and gets off to a rollicking start thanks to Eddie Cole's great piano. For anyone who didn't know, Eddie was Nat's brother. I wish the series had made greater use of Eddie's talents similarly to the the way singers or musicians were employed on the other Warner shows, e.g., the Frankie Ortega Trio on 77SS.

While attending a conference in New Orleans many years ago, I made a point of checking out the Absinthe House. Not surprisingly, the sign is much smaller than it appears in the opening credits. The establishment was offset from other storefronts on the corner of Bienville and Bourbon streets.

I liked when Rex Randolph's homemade gumbo made an appearance. I always got hungry seeing that!
Thank you Tom! I too have been to the Absinthe House, packed as it was with disoriented tourists like myself amid throngs of hipster trash, ha, ha! Pricey. I agree about the underutilization of Eddie Cole, perhaps partly due to the show not having a young songstress featured regularly as with Connie Stevens on Hawaiian Eye, belting out the Great American Songbook of smooth jazz tunes. The Jazz instrumentals underscore of Bourbon Street Beat is a blast onto itself, and my favorite of all the WB shows. You do wish that Eddie Cole had the chance to shine with more screentime to himself...a couple more piano stylings and perhaps some 'Scat' improv...of course, Black performers of all kinds were rarely allowed much TV screentime in those days...With Connie on Hawaiian Eye, you got one or two songs performed in most episodes with the 'Shell Bar' house band led by the joyful (and uncredited) Andre Phillipe, a talented singer himself, and later to be the French teacher on the great James Franciscus and Dean Jagger high school drama Mr. Novak in 1963... Andre Phillipe sang in a few episodes of Mr. Novak, the first season of which is available on DVD from Warner Archive...and in season three of Hawaiian Eye, the Arthur Lyman Group, authentically Hawaiian and riding high in 1961 with the hugely infectious top five instrumental hit 'Yellow Bird', (also 'Jungle Fantasy', 'Legend of the Rain' etc.) became semi-regulars...and then you had Dorothy Provine also singing up a storm on The Alaskans and Roaring 20s...and Margarita Sierra doing her Latin Spitfire infused show tunes on Surfside 6, possibly inspiring Xavier Cugat's 'protege' Charo to later Vegas stardom...

Not that I've ever seen a single episode, but the Frankie Ortega Trio of 77 Sunset Strip fame were later the house band on The Rosey Grier Show (1968-70, 105 episodes), starring the former L.A. Rams Football star and occasional actor as host of his own weekly variety show! Melba Moore, Barbara McNair, Young Americans, Bobby Womack, Morgana King, Thelma Houston, Della Reese, Andy Williams, Lou Rawls, Johnny Nash, Al Jarreau, Mary Wells and Gloria Loring performing with the Frankie Ortega Trio...comedians Bob Hope, Don Rickles, Johnathan Winters, Tommy Smothers, Richard Pryor, Don Adams, Joey Bishop, Pat Paulson also appeared...Mickey Rooney, Robert Culp, Nichelle Nichols, Peter Breck, Ricardo Montalban, Rory Calhoun and Edward G. Robinson dropped by...Rosey's former Rams team mates and now fellow actors Deacon Jones and Roman Gabriel also showed up...and that's just in the first season...the Frankie Ortega Trio appeared in all 105 episodes of the three year run...Roosevelt (Rosey) Grier was also in the regular season six cast of Fess Parker's Daniel Boone during the same period...
 
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Tom.W

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Andre Phillipe, a talented singer himself, and later to be the French teacher on the great James Franciscus and Dean Jagger high school drama Mr. Novak in 1963... Andre Phillipe sang in a few episodes of Mr. Novak, the first season of which is available on DVD from Warner Archive...and in season three of Hawaiian Eye, the Arthur Lyman Group, authentically Hawaiian and riding high in 1961 with the hugely infectious top five instrumental hit 'Yellow Bird', (also 'Jungle Fantasy', 'Legend of the Rain' etc.) became semi-regulars...and then you had Dorothy Provine also singing up a storm on The Alaskans and Roaring 20s...and Margarita Sierra doing her Latin Spitfire infused show tunes on Surfside 6, possibly inspiring Xavier Cugat's 'protege' Charo to later Vegas stardom...
Thanks for pointing out Andre Phillipe's connection to BSB, Randall! Of course, I knew he was the French teacher on Mr. Novak. I'm grateful we have at least the first season of Novak on dvd, as well as Chuck Harter's excellent book, which you promoted so well on this forum. I have the theme albums from all three shows, including 77SS. I recently picked up a compilation of the Ortega trio on cd. HIs music is available online, not sure, maybe a subscription of some sort is required. I really like the way the trio seemlessly weaves together songs from the Great American Songbook. The tinkling of glasses and silverware in the background of the live performance is a nice touch.
 

Flashgear

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I recently picked up a compilation of the Ortega trio on cd. HIs music is available online, not sure, maybe a subscription of some sort is required. I really like the way the trio seemlessly weaves together songs from the Great American Songbook. The tinkling of glasses and silverware in the background of the live performance is a nice touch.
Thanks for that info, Tom! I could well imagine listening to that Frankie Ortega Trio CD with my eyes closed, and aided by his music and the ambient sounds of tinkling glasses and subdued dining conversation in the background, I would construct some sweet visuals in my mind's eye transporting me back to 1958 or so, seated in a nice corner booth at Dino's on Sunset Strip with my good buddies Stu, Jeff, Suzanne and Roscoe...Kookie, with a night off and Lt. Gilmore off duty are with us too...I'm grooving with a Vodka martini in hand and looming over the best prime rib I've ever had...or bussing dishes and doing kitchen clean-up for a dollar an hour, whatever the case may be, ha, ha...this cat's got to make the scene!
 

Flashgear

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Hawaiian Eye season 3 episode 15, Missile Rogues (Jan. 3, 1962) D: Edward Dein, W: Robert Tallman, Sylvia Richards. Guest Cast: Joan Marshall, Jesse White, Warren Stevens, Vladimer Sokoloff, Terrence de Marney, Charles Bateman, Ray Montgomery.

I can see why Anne (Ree) loves this episode, for it is an entertaining action adventure story with a very appealing pair of old eccentrics (the 'Missile Rogues' themselves, Jesse White and Terrence de Marney), and also features an unexpected and touching scene of romantic longing between Cricket and Tom that is beautifully expressed by Connie Stevens just after she sings her sad song to him, and him alone...wake up you damn handsome bastard, she loves you!...part of the problem is that his head is understandably turned by the knockout Joan Marshall...(my screen caps from home made DVD)...
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In the Honolulu marina, two old sea dogs Cedric and Archie (Jessie White and Terrence de Marney) are trying to repair the cranky engine on their old fishing boat...they take an interest in a large and expensive yacht berthed nearby, and being the eccentric philosophers of casual observation that they are, ponder as to who these world travelling strangers may be...Archie: "You know Cedric, I have a strong suspicion that that's an orgy boat. I can just see those poor little girls throwing themselves from the mast. And all the while, them miserable millionaires just sitting there, sipping their martinis out of a lady's open-toed shoe"...
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Cedric, being a regular reader of the Honolulu Advertiser, recognizes the yacht as the 'Free World', on a global anti-war cruise led by renowned peacemaker and Soviet-Bloc defector Dr. Anton Miklas (Vladimir Sokoloff)...together with his assistant Dr. Bilson (Warren Stevens) and colleague Prof. Grimwood (Ray Montgomery)...Grimwood is the inventor behind a secret lightweight metal alloy used for the new Atlas missile's nose cone...Dr. Miklas is being interviewed by the local media reporters interested in his global campaign for peace...another anti-war activist, Pamela Myers (lovely Joan Marshall), has joined the cruise and hired Hawaiian Eye's Tom Lopaka (Robert Conrad of course) to provide security for Dr. Miklas' speaking event this evening...a timely lecture, as the U.S. Navy is about to conduct an Atlas Missile test from California, firing the missile into an offshore target area just off Hawaii...
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Even in this hazy VHS sourced copy of an old KTZZ channel 22 Seattle broadcast, Joan Marshall is a breathtaking knockout, wow! As Pamela Myers, anti-war activist, she proves that she has brains to match her beauty...her suspicions aroused by an old collectible book with strange mathematical formulas tucked inside that she finds in Dr. Bilson's cabin...she knows enough about codes and codebreaking that she rightfully suspects the book is the 'Key' to unlocking the strange mathematical code written in Bilson's hand...
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Obviously as a girl who likely does the NY Times crossword puzzle in ink, Pamela turns her attention to page and word numbers and soon discovers that Bilson's interest in the coming rocket test goes way beyond just protesting it...This is a real book, published in 1900, a best-seller written by George Ade, a nationally syndicated newspaper columnist who was well known as a successful humorist...
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The strange code that she finds...this looks like one of my crib sheet number crunchings from my recent 'Sport Select' lotto picks for the recently completed Stanley Cup and NBA Finals, ha, ha...another $20 shot to hell...
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Just then, a threatening Dr. Bilson sneaks up on her...a rattled Pamela retires to her cabin, knowing that Bilson has ordered her held hostage on the boat...
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Warren Stevens excelled at these kinds of slick and sophisticated evil types, which he did often...
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Meanwhile, Tom is about to leave in Kim's Kab, after helping Cedric and Archie start their old engine...unaware that Pamela is prisoner aboard the yacht...
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Kim (Ponce Ponce), the proprietor of the 'Kab', also friend and informant for the 'Hawaiian Eye' Detective Agency...
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Pamela has escaped from the boat, and after swimming ashore, presents her frightened and soaked-to-the-skin lovely self to a shocked Tom...unseen by the baddies, he hustles her off to the Eye's offices at the Hawaiian Hilton Village Hotel...
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A helpful Cricket gets Pamela out of her wet dress and into a bath towel, which slips ever so slightly from her mid-riff as an excited Tom and Tracey (Anthony Eisely, natch.) lean-in for a good look...Cricket is appalled at these horn-dogs while she brings Pamela some of her own clothes to wear...
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The aforementioned horn-dogs...who could blame them?
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Meanwhile, the rocket boys in California are about to launch their missile to Hawaii...
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Where it will splash down for recovery in the Pacific test range...wouldn't you know it? Cedric and Archie just happen to be fishing right where the missile's nose cone splashes down...
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Continued next post...
 
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Flashgear

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Hawaiian Eye, Missile Rogues (Jan. 3, 1962) continued...

Having rescued the lovely Pamela (Joan Marshall) and secreting her to hide in Cricket's home, Tom Lopaka returns to the Hilton where Cricket is eager to have him hear her new song rehearsal...
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Cricket sings Don't Take Your Love Away From Me...a beautiful song from 1941, written by Henry Nemo and a hit over the years for Bing Crosby, Johnny Ray, Doris Day, Faron Young, Eydie Gorme and Frank Sinatra among others ...a sad, plaintive song of longing for unrequited love...not only is Connie Stevens a truly superb singer, but as a fine actress, she accomplishes so much with her subtle mannerisms in this touching scene...
Hawaiian Eye 211.JPG


Meanwhile off-shore, the Atlas rocket has gone slightly off-course in flight...and now the missile's nose cone made from a secret light-weight metal alloy is bobbing around next to Cedric and Archie's fishing boat...
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Not knowing what it is, the Rogues pull it into their fishing boat and take it ashore to Honolulu...
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The Navy guys, led by Cmdr. Driscoll (Charles Bateman), can't find their lost missile nose cone...not too concerned, as they believe it has sunk to the bottom, and as it is equipped with an automated destruct explosive, the secret nose-cone will soon blow up in 8 hours!
Hawaiian Eye 219.JPG


Soviet spy Bilson (Warren Stevens) listens into the Navy's radio communications as they search for the nose-cone...Bilson and his comrades hope to steal the formula for the lightweight metal alloy from it's inventor Professor Grimwood at his university lab...
Hawaiian Eye 220.JPG


Meanwhile, Pamela, who is in hiding from the Commie spies at Cricket's home, still might not be safe from an amorous Tom Lopaka...ha, ha...
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Cedric and Archie, based on Cedric's interpretation of the astrology column in the daily newspaper and perhaps also under the influence of their home-made hooch brewed up in a stovetop pot, decide that the missile nose cone should be turned into renowned peace crusader Dr. Miklas' custody...swords into ploughshares as they say...
Hawaiian Eye 228.JPG


The problem is Dr. Miklas is an impostor...replaced by a look-alike Soviet spy with murder on his mind! Not only that, but Pamela has been kidnapped by the Commies and taken back to the yacht as a hostage!
Hawaiian Eye 230.JPG


Cedric and Archie put the nose-cone into the back of their pick-up truck and deliver it to the spies on their luxury yacht...along with the unknown bomb inside of it ticking off to it's automated destruction...
Hawaiian Eye 237.JPG

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As the Commies haul the nose-cone and it's hidden bomb onboard, Tom has sneaked onto the yacht to rescue the drugged Pamela and rescue her yet again...
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I leave it to you to guess the happy conclusion of our story...
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Hawaiian Eye 246.JPG

Hawaiian Eye 247.JPG


Joan Marshall, aged 30 at the time of this episode, is truly stunning...a former showgirl, she was in many of the WB series, William Castle's cult film Homicidal, the TV series Bold Venture, I Spy, Bonanza, Dr. Kildare, Star Trek among others...as the wife of producer/director Hal Ashby, it's said that her life was the licentious basis for the Oscar winning 1975 film Shampoo starring Warren Beatty, Goldie Hawn and Julie Christie...something that she was unhappy about...Jesse White, remembered fondly by baby boomers as the lonely Maytag repairman in over 30 years of commercials, had a lengthy showbiz career (Harvey, The Bad Seed, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World and 100s of TV shows)...Terrence de Marney was very active in the Hollywood of the late 50s, early 60s, before returning to his native UK to act for many years afterward...Russian born Vladimir Sokoloff also had a long Hollywood career (Mission to Moscow, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Magnificent 7)...Warren Stevens, perhaps best remembered as the crewman who has his intelligence artificially enhanced, albeit briefly, by the "Krell" machine in the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet, also had a lengthy career, appearing in notable movies like The Barefoot Contessa, Red Skies of Montana, Hot Spell, No Name on the Bullet, and 200+ TV guest shots in just about every series from the fifties to 2007...he passed away at the age of 92...

My screen caps were taken from a home made DVD copy derived from an old VHS recording of a KTTZ channel 22 Seattle broadcast...I know I have a somewhat better copy elsewhere, as with many of these old detective shows I sometimes have multiple sources, but this copy was handy...still, it was very watchable on a 55" LED HDTV, and very enjoyable as well! I shall hunt down some screencaps from better sources (like Maverick and The FBI) of the luscious Joan Marshall and present them here soon.
 
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Rustifer

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Episode Commentary
Bourbon Street Beat
"Suitable For Framing" (S1E32)

Biz must be dreadfully slow at the Absinthe House. Rex (Richard Long) is spending the afternoon at the race track, picking horses named after his favorite Cajun cuisines. He finds a winner in Okra Dokra, and asks fellow race fan, beautiful Hillary St. Clair (Barbara Lord) to join him in a long lunch celebration. Hillary quickly tries to enlist Rex into investigating her husband Lucien (Carleton Young) whom she suspects as trying to murder her. It's funny what a bowl of gumbo can bring out in people. For me, gumbo usually means a protracted stay in the nearest bathroom with a can of Pine Sol.

In true BSB form, Rex is reluctant to take on her case. I have no idea what sort of cases these guys would readily accept as they seem determined to turn down everything that comes their way. However, Hillary convinces Rex to pose as a landscape engineer at her hubby's exclusive gun club. Apparently there's a sizeable portion of crappy marshland around the place that's crawling with gators and icky snakes. The members have been complaining about finding nasty water moccasins in their gun lockers. For his services, Hillary hands Rex a blank check.
"I've always been a fool for blank checks and beautiful women", Rex stupidly confesses.

Rex shows up on time for his undercover appointment at the gun club--and is shown to his room. You see, in Louisiana gun clubs maintain hotel-like accommodations in case landscape engineers show up. Rex meets Lucien's "private" secretary Manuela Ruiz (a very young and pretty Rita Moreno) and immediately turns on his slick hair charm. Lucien proves to be a snot of the first order and denigrates his wife at every turn. Hillary is well aware of her hubby's lust for Manuela--it's actually a wonder she's not trying to murder him. Or is she? Her frustration promotes an attempt to seduce Rex--which he accepts as enthusiastically as finding a hair in his Grandma's pot roast gravy. He decides to terminate his deal with her, but is later convinced by wide-eyed Manuela to stay on. Something is beginning to stink even more than the marsh gas or the restroom after my gumbo meal.

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Lovely Rita; Barbara Lord; Carleton Young; Richard Long

Hillary again confesses her ardor for Rex, then unceremoniously whacks him over the head with a nicely weighted bookend. When he wakes up, he finds Lucien dead as yesterday's news--having been shot by Rex's own gun. Hillary has already called for the cops. Rex looks up the phrase "between a rock and a hard place" as assurance that's where he's currently at. He chooses an alternate solution of jumping out the window and hiding out in Manuela's cabin while she's taking a bath. Rex is no fool when it comes to finding nifty hiding spots.

There's no doubt now that Hillary is a bona fide double-crosser--looking to blame Rex for her husband's death. It's time for Rex to call in the big guns, namely Cal Calhoun (Andrew Duggan) to whom Manuela sends a message in Spanish. Cal, who speaks some Spanish, deciphers it as either a distress call from Rex or a takeout order for Chile Relleno soup. It's Manuela's quick thinking that saves Rex's hide.

And God said, let there be cunning people. Then He created Latino women.

Notes:
This is an unabashed rehash of 77 Sunset Strip's "The Well Selected Frame", originally scripted by Charles Hoffman and reworked for BSB by the non-existent W. Hermanos during a scriptwriter's strike in 1960.
Rex Randolph is no match for Jeff Spencer when hiding out in rooms with naked Spaniards.
 

Rustifer

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Hawaiian Eye season 3 episode 15, Missile Rogues (Jan. 3, 1962) D: Edward Dein, W: Robert Tallman, Sylvia Richards. Guest Cast: Joan Marshall, Jesse White, Warren Stevens, Vladimer Sokoloff, Terrence de Marney, Charles Bateman, Ray Montgomery.
Excellent review, Randall, despite the somewhat fuzzy screen caps. Great background info on the guest stars, too.
I shall hunt down some screencaps from better sources (like Maverick and The FBI) of the luscious Joan Marshall and present them here soon.
Damn right you will!
 

Ree

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Hawaiian Eye, Missile Rogues (Jan. 3, 1962) continued...

Having rescued the lovely Pamela (Joan Marshall) and secreting her to hide in Cricket's home, Tom Lopaka returns to the Hilton where Cricket is eager to have him hear her new song rehearsal...
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Cricket sings Don't Take Your Love Away From Me...a beautiful song from 1941, written by Henry Nemo and a hit over the years for Bing Crosby, Johnny Ray, Doris Day, Faron Young, Eydie Gorme and Frank Sinatra among others ...a sad, plaintive song of longing for unrequited love...not only is Connie Stevens a truly superb singer, but as a fine actress, she accomplishes so much with her subtle mannerisms in this touching scene...
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Meanwhile off-shore, the Atlas rocket has gone slightly off-course in flight...and now the missile's nose cone made from a secret light-weight metal alloy is bobbing around next to Cedric and Archie's fishing boat...
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Not knowing what it is, the Rogues pull it into their fishing boat and take it ashore to Honolulu...
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The Navy guys, led by Cmdr. Driscoll (Charles Bateman), can't find their lost missile nose cone...not too concerned, as they believe it has sunk to the bottom, and as it is equipped with an automated destruct explosive, the secret nose-cone will soon blow up in 8 hours!
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Soviet spy Bilson (Warren Stevens) listens into the Navy's radio communications as they search for the nose-cone...Bilson and his comrades hope to steal the formula for the lightweight metal alloy from it's inventor Professor Grimwood at his university lab...
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Meanwhile, Pamela, who is in hiding from the Commie spies at Cricket's home, still might not be safe from an amorous Tom Lopaka...ha, ha...
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Cedric and Archie, based on Cedric's interpretation of the astrology column in the daily newspaper and perhaps also under the influence of their home-made hooch brewed up in a stovetop pot, decide that the missile nose cone should be turned into renowned peace crusader Dr. Miklas' custody...swords into ploughshares as they say...
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The problem is Dr. Miklas is an impostor...replaced by a look-alike Soviet spy with murder on his mind! Not only that, but Pamela has been kidnapped by the Commies and taken back to the yacht as a hostage!
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Cedric and Archie put the nose-cone into the back of their pick-up truck and deliver it to the spies on their luxury yacht...along with the unknown bomb inside of it ticking off to it's automated destruction...
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As the Commies haul the nose-cone and it's hidden bomb onboard, Tom has sneaked onto the yacht to rescue the drugged Pamela and rescue her yet again...
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I leave it to you to guess the happy conclusion of our story...
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Joan Marshall, aged 30 at the time of this episode, is truly stunning...a former showgirl, she was in many of the WB series, William Castle's cult film Homicidal, the TV series Bold Venture, I Spy, Bonanza, Dr. Kildare, Star Trek among others...as the wife of producer/director Hal Ashby, it's said that her life was the licentious basis for the Oscar winning 1975 film Shampoo starring Warren Beatty, Goldie Hawn and Julie Christie...something that she was unhappy about...Jesse White, remembered fondly by baby boomers as the lonely Maytag repairman in over 30 years of commercials, had a lengthy showbiz career (Harvey, The Bad Seed, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World and 100s of TV shows)...Terrence de Marney was very active in the Hollywood of the late 50s, early 60s, before returning to his native UK to act for many years afterward...Russian born Vladimir Sokoloff also had a long Hollywood career (Mission to Moscow, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Magnificent 7)...Warren Stevens, perhaps best remembered as the crewman who has his intelligence artificially enhanced, albeit briefly, by the "Krell" machine in the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet, also had a lengthy career, appearing in notable movies like The Barefoot Contessa, Red Skies of Montana, Hot Spell, No Name on the Bullet, and 200+ TV guest shots in just about every series from the fifties to 2007...he passed away at the age of 92...

My screen caps were taken from a home made DVD copy derived from an old VHS recording of a KTTZ channel 22 Seattle broadcast...I know I have a somewhat better copy elsewhere, as with many of these old detective shows I sometimes have multiple sources, but this copy was handy...still, it was very watchable on a 55" LED HDTV, and very enjoyable as well! I shall hunt down some screencaps from better sources (like Maverick and The FBI) of the luscious Joan Marshall and present them here soon.
That's a pretty comprehensive review, so I haven't much to add, just one chuckle and one tip of the hat to the director:
The chuckle is in the final scene, when the two old fishermen are rewarded with the "Medal of the Albatross", one asks "What's an albatross?", the other responds "It's the bird from the Rhyme of the ANXIOUS Mariner", and then proceeds to misquote it.
The nod to the director (or cinematographer) comes when Lopaka slowly walks out of the Shell Bar and into the shadows, then pause to look back over his shoulder, as if deeply troubled. Anyone who ever felt that Conrad channeled James Dean would have no doubt about it watching that exit!
Thank you, Randall, for reviewing one of my favorite episodes.
 

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