77 Sunset Strip / Hawaiian Eye, etc.

Gary16

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I was going to say...the episode or the restaurant, but I looked it up:

Puccini's
224 S. Beverly Dr.
Beverly Hills, California

Late 50's. This link has an old column about it dated April 2, 1959:

At the end of the reprint from the L.A. Times blog it said:
(Puccini's, 220 S. Beverly Blvd., had previously been the Harlequin Club and by 1962 was the Tender Loin.)

But the address was 224 S. Beverly Dr. so is the other info correct?

This link has a contract concerning the restaurant:


In the info for it they seem to think it's a contract to open the place and pay rent of $115 a month, but it clearly states it's an amendment to the lease and this is an additional amount.

This was a souvenir menu that could be mailed like a postcard. It opened up.






I never heard of this place before now.
And, yeah, why did this episode appearance never happen?!
Great detective work without help from Stu Bailey himself. Too bad they never made that 77 appearance.
 

Flashgear

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Well here’s something that never happened (unfortunately). From the September 26, 1959 edition of TVGuide:
View attachment 75951
Late 50's. This link has an old column about it dated April 2, 1959:
Great stuff, Gary and Martin!

Well, this is the second time I get to make reference to this book for this thread, pertinent as it is to a restaurant relative of 77 Sunset Strip's Dino's in the same era...

In Anthony Summer's deeply researched 2005 biography of Frank Sinatra, Sinatra: The Life, Puccini's restaurant figures fundamentally in setting the scene for what would become a secret, reckless and very dangerous liaison between future president John F. Kennedy, Frank Sinatra and the Chicago mob of gang boss Sam Giancana...imagine if you will, an evening of fine dining at Puccini's in early November 1959, with the two principle partners Frank Sinatra and Peter Lawford in attendance...joined by Lawford's wife of two years, Patricia Kennedy and her elder brother Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachussetts...his wife Jackie being elsewhere...as the booze flows and the night wears on, Sinatra and Jack's interested gaze falls upon two stunning girls at a table nearby...Sinatra knows one of them, actress Angie Dickinson, but really wants to get to "know" the mystery girl in her company...Judith Campbell (Exner), a statuesque brunette, recently divorced...Sinatra bids his valet Nick Sevano to "bring the broads over"...the party adjourns to Sinatra's Malibu home, where apparently they only just watch movies till 3 AM...Sinatra, smitten with the gorgeous Judith, will pursue her again at Puccini's the very next night, begging her to fly to Honolulu on November 9, 1959 to meet with him (and the Lawfords) at the Honolulu Surfrider hotel...long story short...by March 1960, Judith Campbell, having frequently dated Sinatra since that trip to Hawaii, is also on very intimate terms with Democratic Presidential Candidate John F. Kennedy AND Chicago Mob Boss Sam Giancana! She also is a courier between these two men, carrying messages back and forth to co-ordinate illegal election financing and influence peddling that will pay off big-time in the Chicago precincts come election day in November...declassified White House phone records show Judith Campbell as having placed over 70 phone calls to Jack Kennedy, some of them from Giancana's Oak Park Illinois estate...and we think we have juicy scandals today...

Oh, and apparently Jack Kennedy also got around to bedding Angie Dickinson...an affair confirmed in declassified FBI memos to Director J. Edgar Hoover, who had the dirt on just about every VIP in American public life, and delighted in using those secrets to control these same people to his advantage...

It was interesting to read that LA Daily Mirror column by Paul Coates (showbiz gossip with a sarcastic edge, wow!) where Coates paints a quite pathetic portrait of Peter Lawford...but it fits in the known context, where Lawford knew his close relationship with Sinatra and status in the 'Rat Pack' was totally dependent on his being a Kennedy family In-Law...after having threatened to kill Lawford (over Ava Gardner) in 1954, Sinatra had suddenly reconciled with Lawford with head-spinning speed after he wed Patricia Kennedy in 1957...and as his glamorous brother-in-law Jack rose to prominence as a leading candidate for President in 1960...Sinatra was a great talent, but also a conniving Mafia wanna-be bastard and world-class asshole...Puccini's, as restaurants are wont to come and go, was probably gone by the early sixties?

To tie this delightful fairy tale together, the principle mobsters involved in this story both met appropriate ends...Sam Giancana was shot 7 times in the head in 1975...Johnny Rosselli, the dapper-don of the Hollywood scene and co-conspirator in the Castro assassination plots , was found stuffed into an oil drum floating offshore the same year...both cases unsolved to this day...big year for high profile mob hits, as Jimmy Hoffa also disappeared that same summer...
SAM_0772.JPG

SAM_0777.JPG

SAM_0778.JPG


Too bad that we didn't get an appearance by Sinatra and Lawford on 77 Sunset Strip...or even better yet, an appearance by Dean Martin himself...at least we did get one of the choice 'Rat Pack' with Sammy Davis Jr in season four (The Gangs All Here), albeit a somewhat disappointing episode anyway...
 
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Tom.W

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Wow, great stuff, Randall! Thanks for your summation and the screenshots of the Sinatra book. A lot of dots connected that never made the mainstream press back when Lane's book and other conspiracy theorists were in the news.
 

Rustifer

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Great stuff, Gary and Martin!

Well, this is the second time I get to make reference to this book for this thread, pertinent as it is to a restaurant relative of 77 Sunset Strip's Dino's in the same era...

In Anthony Summer's deeply researched 2005 biography of Frank Sinatra, Sinatra: The Life, Puccini's restaurant figures fundamentally in setting the scene for what would become a secret, reckless and very dangerous liaison between future president John F. Kennedy, Frank Sinatra and the Chicago mob of gang boss Sam Giancana...imagine if you will, an evening of fine dining at Puccini's in early November 1959, with the two principle partners Frank Sinatra and Peter Lawford in attendance...joined by Lawford's wife of two years, Patricia Kennedy and her elder brother Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachussetts...his wife Jackie being elsewhere...as the booze flows and the night wears on, Sinatra and Jack's interested gaze falls upon two stunning girls at a table nearby...Sinatra knows one of them, actress Angie Dickinson, but really wants to get to "know" the mystery girl in her company...Judith Campbell (Exner), a statuesque brunette, recently divorced...Sinatra bids his valet Nick Sevano to "bring the broads over"...the party adjourns to Sinatra's Malibu home, where apparently they only just watch movies till 3 AM...Sinatra, smitten with the gorgeous Judith, will pursue her again at Puccini's the very next night, begging her to fly to Honolulu on November 9, 1959 to meet with him (and the Lawfords) at the Honolulu Surfrider hotel...long story short...by March 1960, Judith Campbell, having frequently dated Sinatra since that trip to Hawaii, is also on very intimate terms with Democratic Presidential Candidate John F. Kennedy AND Chicago Mob Boss Sam Giancana! She also is a courier between these two men, carrying messages back and forth to co-ordinate illegal election financing and influence peddling that will pay off big-time in the Chicago precincts come election day in November...declassified White House phone records show Judith Campbell as having placed over 70 phone calls to Jack Kennedy, some of them from Giancana's Oak Park Illinois estate...and we think we have juicy scandals today...

Oh, and apparently Jack Kennedy also got around to bedding Angie Dickinson...an affair confirmed in declassified FBI memos to Director J. Edgar Hoover, who had the dirt on just about every VIP in American public life, and delighted in using those secrets to control these same people to his advantage...

It was interesting to read that LA Daily Mirror column by Paul Coates (showbiz gossip with a sarcastic edge, wow!) where Coates paints a quite pathetic portrait of Peter Lawford...but it fits in the known context, where Lawford knew his close relationship with Sinatra and status in the 'Rat Pack' was totally dependent on his being a Kennedy family In-Law...after having threatened to kill Lawford (over Ava Gardner) in 1954, Sinatra had suddenly reconciled with Lawford with head-spinning speed after he wed Patricia Kennedy in 1957...and as his glamorous brother-in-law Jack rose to prominence as a leading candidate for President in 1960...Sinatra was a great talent, but also a conniving Mafia wanna-be bastard and world-class asshole...Puccini's, as restaurants are wont to come and go, was probably gone by the early sixties?

To tie this delightful fairy tale together, the principle mobsters involved in this story both met appropriate ends...Sam Giancana was shot 7 times in the head in 1975...Johnny Rosselli, the dapper-don of the Hollywood scene and co-conspirator in the Castro assassination plots , was found stuffed into an oil drum floating offshore the same year...both cases unsolved to this day...big year for high profile mob hits, as Jimmy Hoffa also disappeared that same summer...
View attachment 76048
View attachment 76049
View attachment 76050

Too bad that we didn't get an appearance by Sinatra and Lawford on 77 Sunset Strip...or even better yet, an appearance by Dean Martin himself...at least we did get one of the choice 'Rat Pack' with Sammy Davis Jr in season four (The Gangs All Here), albeit a somewhat disappointing episode anyway...
Great example of fact sometimes being stranger than fiction, Randall. Doesn't hurt that some of the players have names like Kennedy, Sinatra, Giancana...

If Angie Dickinson ever needed a quick trillion dollars, she could write a tell-all book--it would fly off the shelves. But the lady has kept quiet all these years and I fear she and her secrets will eventually be dirt nap companions.

The first time I ever knew who Peter Lawford was came from the Thin Man TV series back in 1957. I thought he was the greatest thing since pulpless orange juice, and long before I was even aware of the original William Powell / Myrna Loy films. Peter and Phyllis Kirk made for such a slick couple--although nowhere near the star power of Powell and Loy, as I later discovered.

1595947006106.png


I'm pretty sure this breezy private eye series led me directly into my lifelong fascination of 77 Sunset Strip. Martinis, cool dudes, snazzy gals, snub-nose pistols and sleek convertibles. I wanted to grow up to be a detective. I got as far as the martinis.*

*Well, I owned a Chrysler Lebaron convertible in 1983, but I'd hardly call it sleek. It went from 0 to 60 mph in about an hour and a half.
 
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Flashgear

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Wow, great stuff, Randall! Thanks for your summation and the screenshots of the Sinatra book. A lot of dots connected that never made the mainstream press back when Lane's book and other conspiracy theorists were in the news.
Thank you Tom. You mentioned Mark Lane, a total fraud who originated the destructive cottage industry of absurd conspiracy theories, having cozied up to the awful and despicable Marguerite Oswald, mother of the president's killer within weeks of the assassination. It took too many years for Lane's corrosive lies to be exposed with great books like Vincent Bugliosi's Reclaiming History and Philip Shenon's A Cruel and Shocking Act...despite all the mind-bending scandals since revealed, I still regard Kennedy to be one of the great post-war presidents...

If Angie Dickinson ever needed a quick trillion dollars, she could write a tell-all book--it would fly off the shelves. But the lady has kept quiet all these years and I fear she and her secrets will eventually be dirt nap companions.
I agree Russ, she is a classy lady for not divulging, nor capitalizing, on her involvement in such past dalliances. She has been interviewed on the subject of Jack Kennedy recently on CBS Sunday Morning and again politely declined to answer questions about the president, and Sinatra also.
The first time I ever knew who Peter Lawford was came from the Thin Man TV series back in 1957. I thought he was the greatest thing since pulpless orange juice, and long before I was even aware of the original William Powell / Myrna Loy films. Peter and Phyllis Kirk made for such a slick couple--although nowhere near the star power of Powell and Loy, as I later discovered.

1595947006106.png
1595947006106.png
I have most of The Thin Man TV series on homemade DVDs, and quite like the television treatment with Phyllis Kirk and Peter Lawford...Russ, I agree that they do suffer in comparison to Loy and Powell, but I think they did a credible job. It's a fun series. And the wire terrier Asta is always great, ha, ha...Along with the rest of the MGM TV productions of that era, It's locked up in the same dark Warner's vault along with our beloved 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye,etc.,
 
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Mysto

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Great example of fact sometimes being stranger than fiction, Randall. Doesn't hurt that some of the players have names like Kennedy, Sinatra, Giancana...

If Angie Dickinson ever needed a quick trillion dollars, she could write a tell-all book--it would fly off the shelves. But the lady has kept quiet all these years and I fear she and her secrets will eventually be dirt nap companions.

The first time I ever knew who Peter Lawford was came from the Thin Man TV series back in 1957. I thought he was the greatest thing since pulpless orange juice, and long before I was even aware of the original William Powell / Myrna Loy films. Peter and Phyllis Kirk made for such a slick couple--although nowhere near the star power of Powell and Loy, as I later discovered.

View attachment 76106

I'm pretty sure this breezy private eye series led me directly into my lifelong fascination of 77 Sunset Strip. Martinis, cool dudes, snazzy gals, snub-nose pistols and sleek convertibles. I wanted to grow up to be a detective. I got as far as the martinis.*

*Well, I owned a Chrysler Lebaron convertible in 1983, but I'd hardly call it sleek. It went from 0 to 60 mph in about an hour and a half.
Being older than you my early memories in crime - private eye shows was Man Against Crime (I still remember the machine gun thru the door) and Boston Blackie with Kent Taylor. I'm sure that's where my love for these started as well as my fascination with B movies.
 

Rustifer

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Being older than you my early memories in crime - private eye shows was Man Against Crime (I still remember the machine gun thru the door) and Boston Blackie with Kent Taylor. I'm sure that's where my love for these started as well as my fascination with B movies.
Yeah, you are older than me, you old coot.
Always good to hear you weigh in, Marv. Don't stay a stranger. And keep getting older.
 

MartinP.

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If Angie Dickinson ever needed a quick trillion dollars, she could write a tell-all book--it would fly off the shelves.
This wouldn't be in her tell-all book, but when AMPAS was having their Best Picture screening series in the early 2000's, a friend and I attended many of them. When we went to see The Last Emperor, Angie Dickinson and companion sat next to us. During the movie she dozed off and her head rested on my friend's shoulder.
 
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Rustifer

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This wouldn't be in her tell-all book, but when AMPAS was having their Best Picture screening series in the early 2000's, a friend and I attended many of them. When we went to see The Last Emperor, Angie Dickinson and companion sat next to us. During the movie she dozed off and her head rested on my friend's shoulder.
Now THAT would be a selfie moment.
 
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Rustifer

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Episode Commentary
Hawaiian Eye
"Total Eclipse" (S3E22)

Much to the public and prosecutor's surprise, vixen Jean Morgan (Kathryn Hays) is found 'not guilty' of murdering her husband. He died via a few bullets to the back as opposed to her bad meatloaf with green olive recipe. Enraged at her acquittal is stepson Tony (played by a toothily snarling Jack Nicholson) who's sure some fix was applied to the trial. All of this is on the eve of a total eclipse--which heretofore we have no clue as to the bearing of this phenomenon unless Bonnie Tyler was inspired in some way by the episode.

Even though freed, Jean would like Tom Lopaka (Robert Conrad) to permanently clear her name in the press and public. Tom refuses, as he thinks she's about as innocent as Charles Manson. That table scrap falls to partner Tracy Steele, who's smitten with Jean. Instead, Tom opts to work for stepson Tony, who is most anxious to prove stepmommy's guilt.

In the meantime, we learn that Jean's lawyer Frank Rowley (Robert Lowery) has been ogling her with unrequited lust for years, and as such, practiced some decidedly unethical jurisprudence to save her pearly skin. Not only does she cause Frank's crotch to sing hallelujah, but also Jerry Dulaine's (Sherwood Price), an assistant in Jean's late husband's scientific foundation run by another admirer, Dr. Joseph Loring (Whit Bissell). Whew. This whole thing is about as murky as breathing through dirty flannel.

1596383303370.png
1596383360066.png
1596383539154.png
1596383602259.png

Kathryn Hays; a very young Jack Nicholson; Clark Gable..er...Robert Lowery; Whit Bissell

Well, it's time to cut to the Shell Bar, where Cricket (Connie Stevens) is warbling a markedly pitchy "Dancing in the Dark"--not the Bruce Springsteen version. All the aforementioned characters are in the bar when staggering in is Tony, toasted as a pop tart--who immediately gets into a scuffle with Frank and Jerry. Tracy breaks up the fight and assumes a seat next to Jean, practically clawing him raw underneath the table. Johnny, whose brain will later be biologically classified as zucchini, is positively jealous. Returning to her hotel room, a couple of shots are fired in her direction--justifying her practice of wearing adult diapers. There's a crapload of suspects, complicated by the fact that Tom and Tracy are on opposite sides of one another.

So what's with this 'scientific' foundation? It's main purpose seems to be photographing the eclipse of the sun--an effort about as complicated as a Chinese finger pull. And yet the entire cast of characters gather together to assist in this effort. This gives Tracy and Jean a chance to do a Burt Lancaster / Deborah Kerr on the beach and get sand in all those hard-to-reach places. Ahhhh...sweet friction...
Is Jean guilty or not? If not, who shot her husband? Who shot at her? Who put the bop in the bop shoo bop? Surprisingly, the answer lies with Jean's houseboy, who we see for all of about 5 seconds. The rest remains as dark as the eclipse of the sun.
 
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Bob Goughan

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Episode Commentary
Hawaiian Eye
"Total Eclipse" (S3E22)

Much to the public and prosecutor's surprise, vixen Jean Morgan (Kathryn Hays) is found 'not guilty' of murdering her husband. He died via a few bullets to the back as opposed to her bad meatloaf with green olive recipe. Enraged at her acquittal is stepson Tony (played by a toothily snarling Jack Nicholson) who's sure some fix was applied to the trial. All of this is on the eve of a total eclipse--which heretofore we have no clue as to the bearing of this phenomenon unless Bonnie Tyler was inspired in some way by the episode.

Even though freed, Jean would like Tom Lopaka (Robert Conrad) to permanently clear her name in the press and public. Tom refuses, as he thinks she's about as innocent as Charles Manson. That table scrap falls to partner Tracy Steele, who's smitten with Jean. Instead, Tom opts to work for stepson Tony, who is most anxious to prove stepmommy's guilt.

In the meantime, we learn that Jean's lawyer Frank Rowley (Robert Lowery) has been ogling her with unrequited lust for years, and as such, practiced some decidedly unethical jurisprudence to have her pearly skin. Not only does she cause Frank's crotch to sing hallelujah, but also Jerry Dulaine's (Sherwood Price), an assistant in Jean's late husband's scientific foundation run by another admirer, Dr. Joseph Loring (Whit Bissell). Whew. This whole thing is about as murky as breathing through dirty flannel.

View attachment 76363 View attachment 76364 View attachment 76365 View attachment 76366
Kathryn Hays; a very young Jack Nicholson; Clark Gable..er...Robert Lowery; Whit Bissell

Well, it's time to cut to the Shell Bar, where Cricket (Connie Stevens) is warbling a markedly pitchy "Dancing in the Dark"--not the Bruce Springsteen version. All the aforementioned characters are in the bar when staggering in is Tony, toasted as a pop tart--who immediately gets into a scuffle with Frank and Jerry. Tracy breaks up the fight and assumes a seat next to Jean, practically clawing him raw underneath the table. Johnny, whose brain will later be biologically classified as zucchini, is positively jealous. Returning to her hotel room, a couple of shots are fired in her direction--justifying her practice of wearing adult diapers. There's a crapload of suspects, complicated by the fact that Tom and Tracy are on opposite sides of one another.

So what's with this 'scientific' foundation? It's main purpose seems to be photographing the eclipse of the sun--an effort about as complicated as a Chinese finger pull. And yet the entire cast of characters gather together to assist in this effort. This gives Tracy and Jean a chance to do a Burt Lancaster / Deborah Kerr on the beach and get sand in all those hard-to-reach places. Ahhhh...sweet friction...
Is Jean guilty or not? If not, who shot her husband? Who shot at her? Who put the bop in the bop shoo bop? Surprisingly, the answer lies with Jean's houseboy, who we see for all of about 5 seconds. The rest remains as dark as the eclipse of the sun.
While conceding that it is a low bar; the commentary was way better than the episode itself.
 
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criblecoblis

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I mentioned a while back that I've been watching the Michael Shayne TV series, and I thought I'd discuss the show very briefly here, because I think it may have some interest to you all.

This is a show that ran for 32 episodes in the 1960-61 season, Fridays from 10–11 PM on NBC, right after 77 Sunset Strip on ABC. A number of episodes are available on Internet Archive; Wifey and I have watched several, and find the show quite enjoyable. Sadly, it was on against Twilight Zone and The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, and it did not make it to a second season.

The show stars Richard Denning as Shayne; the regulars were Herbert Rudley, Jerry Paris, Patricia Donahue and Gary Clarke. So far, the prints have proved quite watchable. And they're free! The episodes we've seen are well-written and -acted. I think it's worth checking out for anyone who enjoys the WB detective series.
 

Rustifer

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I mentioned a while back that I've been watching the Michael Shayne TV series, and I thought I'd discuss the show very briefly here, because I think it may have some interest to you all.

This is a show that ran for 32 episodes in the 1960-61 season, Fridays from 10–11 PM on NBC, right after 77 Sunset Strip on ABC. A number of episodes are available on Internet Archive; Wifey and I have watched several, and find the show quite enjoyable. Sadly, it was on against Twilight Zone and The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor, and it did not make it to a second season.

The show stars Richard Denning as Shayne; the regulars were Herbert Rudley, Jerry Paris, Patricia Donahue and Gary Clarke. So far, the prints have proved quite watchable. And they're free! The episodes we've seen are well-written and -acted. I think it's worth checking out for anyone who enjoys the WB detective series.
Now I know why I'm unfamiliar with the Michael Shayne series. If it was on opposite The Twilight Zone, it had no chance of gaining my viewership. But probably more the reason would be that in 1960 I was 11 years old and told to be in bed by 10:00, Friday or no Friday.
Thanks for the explanation, Rob.
 

Ree

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Anne
Now I know why I'm unfamiliar with the Michael Shayne series. If it was on opposite The Twilight Zone, it had no chance of gaining my viewership. But probably more the reason would be that in 1960 I was 11 years old and told to be in bed by 10:00, Friday or no Friday.
Thanks for the explanation, Rob.
I was 12 y.o. and was allowed up (not a school night). Plus, I could be a brat if I had to miss my favorites, which included Gary Clarke. Thank you for directing me to Internet Archive.
 

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