75-Ohm round coaxial vs. component video cable's

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Shawn N, Jul 7, 2004.

  1. Shawn N

    Shawn N Agent

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    I'm having a hard time getting my on screen display from my reciever to TV working. The manual says to use a 75-Ohm round coaxial cable. I thought this was the same thing as a component video cable? Isn't it? Just trying to rule out the fact that I may be using the wrong cable. I was also given the wrong denon remote control but don't think this is the reason. Any suggestions?

    I have a denon 1804 reciever and mitsubushi tv.
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Component video cables are round 75 ohm coaxial cables also. What counts is the proper kind of plugs (usually RCA, once in awhile BNC) on the ends and also sufficient bandwidth for the video signal, suggested three times 37 MHz for HDTV, 3 times 13 MHz for progressive scan. The coaxial cable used for antenna and cable box runs actually has a higher bandwidth.

    Unfortunately there is sometimes no easy way to figure out the bandwidth of the cable, sometimes labeled "premium grade" or "gold plated contacts" or (nothing special). You cannot tell the grade by looking at the outside since part of the quality depends on the material that holds the center conductor centered (concentric; coaxial) within the braided shield conductor inside.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/whyten.htm
     
  3. Jonathan Smith

    Jonathan Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    Shawn,

    What video output on your receiver are you using? Although more and more receivers are capable of doing component video switching, few of them will output the on screen menu through this connection. If you are only connected using component video, try using the RCA video output (usually yellow in color). This connection uses one cable like the one you mentioned rather than three. I am not sure about your particular model, but the S-video connection may work as well.

    If that is already what you are doing, I don't know what to tell you. Good luck.

    Jonathan
     
  4. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    'm with Jonathan- I've had a few receivers which would NOT output the OSD material via the component cable and you had to wire an additional output from the standard composite output in order to see the OSD-- this is likely what you're experiencing.

    -V
     

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