720p vs. 1080p

Discussion in 'Displays' started by ToddTH, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. ToddTH

    ToddTH Auditioning

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    Hi everyone,

    I am new to this and just trying to wrap my mind around all the info. I just bought the 56" samsung DLP that has a max of 720p. I just found out that the 1080p is coming soon and I can get that one for not that much more money than I paid for the 720p. My question is should I go through the exchange of the tv and the hassle. Is the difference going to be huge? I know that things get outdated fast, I just don't want to start outdated.

    Thanks,

    Todd
     
  2. EricRWem

    EricRWem Screenwriter

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    My advice would be to wait until 2006, at least, when they release 1080p ready displays that actually have at least one input that accepts native 1080p from an external source...unlike now.

    All these displays do is upscale 1080i or 720p to a 1080p native resolution.

    You just bought yourself a nice TV that should serve you well for a good numbers of years.

    As it stands, these 1080p native resolution displays are very nice sets but the strike me as glorified half steps, imho.

    Why in the world could they not release those sets and have the HDMI input. at least, accept native 1080p is truly beyond me.

    I know it can be done and it should have been done and it would NOT have affected the overall cost of these sets very much.

    1080p broadcasts and other content like it are years away from becoming prevalent, so...you've got some time. [​IMG]
     
  3. benjaminBen

    benjaminBen Stunt Coordinator

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    In 2006 what do you think the prices will run? I am planning on buying a 1080p TV at the same time i buy a ps3. Since the ps3 will play games in 1080p it will be a good investment for me and i plan on keeping the tv for many years. Playing games and watching sports is the only 2 things i do on a tv.
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    a native 1080p DLP will probably quite pricey, but LCOS and LCD will probably be cheaper out the gates.
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    If you want 1080 on an LCD or a DLP or an LCOS it must be 1080p native. The set must have a de-interlacer of some kind to display incoming 1080i HDTV and a scaler of some kind to display 720p HDTV. Now it is technically possible although non-trivial to feed 1080i directly onto the display, alternate rows of pixels at a time, and this becomes a defacto weave de-interlacing, motion artifacts and all, with the display itself as the de-interlacer.

    "Good" 1080i de-interlacing (motion adaptive, 3-2 pulldown recognition and retention) is not out there yet for less than 4 figures' contribution to the TV set's price. You will want to check the 1080p TV you are interested in for de-interlacing quality, and this is hard to do since test patterns are hard to come by.

    Incoming 1080p needs 75 MHz of video bandwidth for the entire video signal path including the cables and the circuits just inside the video jacks, at least for component video connections, I suspect digital connections need bandwidth somewhere in the same ballpark. Whereas 720p and 1080i need just half that.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/viddoubl.htm
     
  6. PerryD

    PerryD Supporting Actor

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    Unless things have changed, I believe that the new 1920x1080 DLPs (xHD3) actually display 960x1080 pixels interlacing the horizontal 1920 resolution. A true 1280x720 or 1400x1050 DLP panel may provide more resolution than the new "1080" panels.
     
  7. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    the xHD3 machines are doing this, true. There is other stuff on the horizon.
     
  8. Rolando

    Rolando Screenwriter

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    ChrisWiggles
    you think they will eventually go back to non-wobulated chips? would be cool!
     
  9. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    yes. or they'll never be able to compete with 1080p and higher native LCD and LCOS chips. As it stands now, IMO they're already pretty far behind.
     

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