720p, 1080i, and 1080p

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Mike Milillo, Nov 23, 2005.

  1. Mike Milillo

    Mike Milillo Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello everybody. I am starting to go crazy over here doing my research.

    Are all LCD and DLP rear projections 720p or 1080p?

    What is better, 720p or 1080i?

    How do 1080i signals look on a 720p display?

    Even though I am pretty much priced out of 1080p displays, is it a bad thing to not buy a 1080p display now? In other words, am I screwing myself in the future by not getting a 1080p set now?

    This is my first HDTV purchase, and I am leaning towards a JVC Lcos 52" set.

    In the future, when all broadcasting is 1080p, will these signals not look good on this set?

    I am starting to rally pull my hair out here, LOL.

    thanks for any help you guys can through my way
     
  2. Mike Milillo

    Mike Milillo Stunt Coordinator

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    Are 1080i sets pretty much not being produced anymore? Are these only in CRT rear projections?
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    fixed-pixel displays are progressive by nature, CRT's by the nature of their raster scanning can operate in interlaced mode.

    digital displays have varieties of native resolutions, some are not 1280x720 or 1920x1080, there are many other resolutions out there that you can run into, though most nowadays in terms of consumer displays are these resolutions. You'll see other various resolutions for more graphics-based displays like computer monitors and business projectors etc for instance. Look for the native resolution to see what the actual resolution of the display panel is.

    When displaying source resolutions that are of different from the native resolution of a display, there must be scaling, and the quality of the final image will be determined by the quality of the source and the quality of the scaling used to re-scale the image to a new resolution. If scaling is poor, then image quality may be lackluster compared to inputting the native resolution of the display. When talking 1080p displays, you're not going to be running into native 1080p content anytime in the remotely near future, so scaling is important, but so too is scaling important on 720 native displays. In any case, you shouldn't be paranois about buying say a 720 display and thinking that 1080i content is going to look like garbage. As long as you view the display critically, hopefully inputting content at those resolutions you should be able to asses the quality of the scaling and of the image. There is nothing inherent that will make 1080 on a 720 display suck, as long as the scaling is of quality, then the image will be stellar.
     
  4. Mike Milillo

    Mike Milillo Stunt Coordinator

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    thanks for the info. Do you know how good the scaler is on the 52 inch JVC Lcos sets? HD-52G786
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    no I haven't seen any of the JVC consumer sets so I don't know what the scaling is like. I've only spent time with the jvc HD2K, and the scaler for that is outboard and of relatively high quality.
     
  6. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    A good 720p (or 768p) TV will give you lasting pleasure for many years.

    Just in case you are thinking about a 1080p TV, you should make sure it accepts [email protected] (@60 fps) input with HDCP if you ever want to upgrade some of the supporting electronics such as scalers. Otherwise wait, perhaps getting a 720p TV and save the money. Without [email protected] input your 1080p TV cannot take advantage of external scalers such as the Lumagen HDP or Faroudja DVP1080 or Realta chipset scalers that outdo most of the built in scalers in HDTV sets, HDTV cable/satellite boxes, and HDTV set top tuner boxes today. These scalers also do wonders on 1080i programs to go to 720p TV's.

    [email protected] and [email protected] programs are broadcast today and are delivered to the TV as 1080i (if not converted to 720p or SDTV). [email protected] programs cannot be broadcast in the channel bandwidth allotted and [email protected] video signals are encountered by the consumer only in connection with external scalers. While I don't have any HDTV sources at home, from what I have read, the scalers I named go more than halfway converting today's 1080i into native [email protected] quality.

    Built in scaler quality remains a big unknown in HDTV sets and the quality varies widely, "all over the map" I would like to say. Some 1080 sets deliver only 540 lines of vertical resolution for 720p programs. Some 720p sets deliver only 540 lines of resolution for 1080i programs. Some sets deliver only 540 lines of resolution for all HDTV programs. There is an article in The Perfect Vision, I think the December 2005 issue, about this.

    Only with test patterns can the casual viewer quickly determine scaler quality. While many serious videophiles do not rely heavily on Consumer Reports, that magazine could do the public a great service by pointing out HDTV sets that have obviously poor scalers.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/hdtvnot.htm
     
  7. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    After my head nearly exploded trying to figure this all out and seriously flirting with a Sony SXRD 1080p 50" set, I finally went with a JVC D-ILA 720p in the 56" size from Best Buy. Between various discounts, Reward Zone points the set will cost me $2200 including indoor delivery to my 3rd floor walk-up. I think I'll be happy with set for some time to come and I saved enough to and at that size and my viewing distance I don't think a 1080p would look so much better that it would justify the extra cost. Hell, for what I saved I can now get that $500 Black Friday Westinghouse 27" LCD for the bedroom, and by pointing out that with price matching I could get the same deal down the street, I was able to get a free HDMI cable and convince the salesman to bend the 30-day in-store price match and let me exchange the 27" Westinghouse LCD I had bought 33 days before for $899.99 for the 32" version that they were now selling for the same $899.99. (Plus I now get to use a 10% off coupon on the "new" set.)

    Basically for less than the Sony 1080p I get a bigger JVC 720p and two flat-panels for the home office and bedroom which I think will carry me through the next several very happily especially given how little native 1080p material is going to be available.

    Regards,

    Joe
     

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