$5,000.00 speakers and reciever

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by MikeDP, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. MikeDP

    MikeDP Auditioning

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    Well I am ditching my old HT system and have a 5,000.00 limit to spend on a new HT. Where do I begin? Ill need a reciever and a speaker setup.
     
  2. Seth=L

    Seth=L Screenwriter

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    We need to know your listening priorties; music, movies, percentage of what you will use the system most for.
    Also the listening environment and type of sound you are looking for.
    What is the current system you are ditching?

    Seth=L
     
  3. MikeDP

    MikeDP Auditioning

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    will be mostly movies, but music will and cannot be ingored. I am looking for ultimate sound..i wanna hear all effects, i want to jump out of my seat during horror flicks, As for the environment I am building a theater in my basement of the house that the wife and i are currently building..so we have a dedicated space of about 30 feet deep by about 20 wide. I am lookin for something that when we have guests over they will be in awe at the sound.

    as for the system i am ditching it is a polk audio..as for model numbers only onne i can remember is the R15s i bought the system as a package so whatever sub, center and towers came with that. as for reciever i am
    moving my yamaha rx-v650 to the upstairs
     
  4. mackie

    mackie Supporting Actor

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    My vote - Paradigm Studio 40s, CC470, & 20s for rears. That's about 1/2 your budget. BTW these are great for music and movies. Add a HSU or SVS sub of your choice and get a Denon 3806 or comparable Yamaha. If you're worried about having enough power get a used amp off ebay or audiogon. The sub will provide most of the "WOW" factor.

    This is what I have, and I love it. I've listened to many other speakers since I've gotten them, but none make me want to change except the B&W 800 series which a setup of those will be about 3 x your budget.
     
  5. Seth=L

    Seth=L Screenwriter

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    The Paradigm Studio 40's and the 20's are awesome all around speakers. It is advised to spend the extra money for the coinsiding stands because these are bookshelf speakers, but don't let the size fool you. These speakers have a very high power handling and are very accurate and like Mackie says they do well with music and movies, very versitale. The bass the 20's can produce is amazing let alone the 40's.

    Seth=L
     
  6. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Paradigm is a very good option. Another option is Ascend Acoustics. You could get three pairs of their 340's with the matching center for a 7 speaker setup for ~$1900 shipped. Add an SVS PB12-Plus/2 for about ~$1300 shipped. Then pick up either the Outlaw Audio 970/7075 package or the Denon 3806 for around $1200-$1400. That would also leave money to pick up the Behringer Feedback Destroyer to dial in your sub.

    Reasoning: You've got a pretty large room there, so a large sub will be necessary to get that "jump out of my seat"-effect you're looking for. Also, such a large room could really benefit from 7.1. Finally, a BFD is what will really make your sub sound incredible, so it's well worth the $100 or so that it costs.
     
  7. mackie

    mackie Supporting Actor

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    Second the BFD idea.
     
  8. Sami Kallio

    Sami Kallio Screenwriter

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    Instead of a receiver, you have a budget to go with separates, used or new. Outlaw has a prepro/amp combo for a little over $1k new, that's about what you would pay for a good receiver. I haven't heard the Outlaw so I can't say how good it is but I got a used B&K prepro and 5 channel amp for less than $200 on the used market and it beats out my $2000 receiver in SQ.
     
  9. Bob_Lawrance

    Bob_Lawrance Stunt Coordinator

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    WHat is a Behringer Feedback Destroyer?

    What is it used for?
     
  10. BradJudy

    BradJudy Stunt Coordinator

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    If you're open to internet-direct options, you could put together a killer package with speakers from AV123, Ascend or Axiom ($1.5k-3k), a sub from SVS, Hsu, AV123 or Axiom ($1k or less) and electronics from Outlaw or AV123 (~$1k). They all make great products (I haven't heard Axioms personally, but I've heard the rest) at very good prices.

    If you prefer a local shop, there are also lots of options (like Paradigm, as mentioned) and the list can be quite long. The best option there is to check out local stores and see what sounds good to you. Keep in mind that nothing will sound exactly the same in your home as it does in the store since the room plays a huge role (as well as other potential differences). Make sure you buy from a store with a 30-day return policy (or something similar) in case you don't like them when you get them home.
     
  11. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    In the home theater world a BFD is used as a parametric equalizer for subwoofers. It's more affordable than other similar solutions, but doesn't offer quite as many features as something like the SMS-01. It does a great job of flattening out sub response in a room which can be pretty difficult as most rooms aren't ideally shaped and don't offer too many placement options.

    The purpose this was manufactured for is mostly live audio applications to kill feedback in real-time (using automated parametric eq's).
     
  12. Bob_Lawrance

    Bob_Lawrance Stunt Coordinator

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    Seth

    Thanks for the explanation but man I am lost.

    Is this for the more experienced user?
     
  13. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    No. This is for the user who wants the best sound at an affordable price. www.hometheatershack.com has a section devoted to the BFD and associated measurement software. You can get as detailed as you want.

    -Robert
     
  14. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Basically here's the deal: If you understand how sound works, then you know that lower frequency sounds have longer wavelenths than higher frequency sounds. Many of these lower frequencies are handled by the subwoofer in home theaters. The longer wavelengths tend to interact with the room more noticably than shorter wavelengths.

    Often, an individual will purchase a very nice subwoofer and place it in the only available spot in the room. They'll calibrate the sub to their desired level and then find they're very unsatisfied with the bass. This generally means they are sitting a a null, or a deep valley, for some of the more commonly used frequencies (e.g. 40Hz-80Hz).

    The frequencies affected and the severity of the peaks and valleys can be tamed in various ways. The first is room design/placement. If your room is a perfect square then you're doomed to have problems. If it is a rectangle of roughly length=1.5*width (e.g. 15ft wide x 22.5ft long) then you're better off. Also, perfect placement is very difficult in most rooms due to the size of subwoofers and the WAF. The second way to deal with it is room treatments. These can be costly and/or ugly, but can be pretty effective. The third option is equalization, this is where the BFD comes in.

    There are lots of guides/threads out there that can explain how to use the BFD much better than I can. But basically you do frequency tests at your listening position and then adjust the equalizers on the BFD to compensate for the peaks and valleys. It's not a perfect solution, but it does a very good job . . . especially when combined with a good room and/or room treatments. Honestly, IMO it's almost silly to spend more than $500 or so on a sub without including a BFD (or other forms of treatment) into your budget.
     
  15. BradJudy

    BradJudy Stunt Coordinator

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    Yes, the BFD is for more experienced users in that it requires a good learning curve about what you're trying to do and how to do it. Programs like Room EQ Wizard (free) have dropped the learning curve a lot, but it's not for your typical person. It's for someone who wants to tweak their system and is willing to spend time to learn how to do it and to go through the process, but wants to spend minimal money. There are other products (like Velodyne SMS-1 or Onix R-DES) that accomplish the same goal with different costs and levels of learning/interfaces.
     

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