400 BLOWS re-release by Criterion

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Chris Wagner, Mar 3, 2002.

  1. Chris Wagner

    Chris Wagner Stunt Coordinator

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    While perusing the web I discovered that this particular title is in the "Coming Soon" section of CriterionDVD, and not the "Rumors" section along with the rest of the Wellspring titles.
    I realize that this had been hinted at in an article a few weeks ago, and is still mere speculation.
    Also that CriterionDVD is an "Unofficial" website, but...
    Here's to hope.
    link: CriterionDVD Coming Soon
     
  2. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Producer
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    Chris-
    I hope like you do. [​IMG]
    Mark
     
  3. Ted Todorov

    Ted Todorov Producer

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  4. Dome Vongvises

    Dome Vongvises Lead Actor

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    To the more knowledgeable people of the forum, does anybody have any clue why this movie is called The 400 Blows? Is that a mistranslation of the foreign title?
     
  5. Jeremy

    Jeremy Stunt Coordinator

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  6. Craig Cunningham

    Craig Cunningham Stunt Coordinator

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    I read somewhere that it's a mistranslation. "Les Quatre cents coups" supposedly means "To live a wild life".
     
  7. Craig Cunningham

    Craig Cunningham Stunt Coordinator

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    I found an entry in my encyclopedia for The 400 Blows. It says the title roughly means "to stand up and endure the worst of anything".
     
  8. Jussi Tarvainen

    Jussi Tarvainen Second Unit

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  9. Ted Todorov

    Ted Todorov Producer

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  10. StevenA

    StevenA Second Unit

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    To add to the "terrible translation of titles into English" list (this is fun!), consider:

    Rohmer's L'ami de mon amie (which means: My girlfriend's boyfriend) was retitled "Boyfriends and Girlfriends".

    Une liaison pornographique (A pornographic affair) was retitled "An Affair of Love", which is not only horrible but also misrepresents the film.

    There is also some controversy over the translation of La Grande Illusion to Grand Illusion, since the French "grande" means "great", in the sense of big or substantial, not grand as it is used in English.
     
  11. Jay Gregory

    Jay Gregory Stunt Coordinator

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  12. Ben Motley

    Ben Motley Supporting Actor

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    How is grand used in English other than below?
     
  13. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

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  14. StevenA

    StevenA Second Unit

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    Ben, there certainly seems to be a difference in the sense of the word grand in French and (current) English. I wouldn't say, in English: "I live in a grand house" unless I was intending to make the inference that the house was, well, grand in some way. In French however, as I understand, "la grande maison" could refer to a house which is simply big, or "great", in the sense of size.
     
  15. Carrol M

    Carrol M Stunt Coordinator

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    I always thought it meant "to raise hell"?
     
  16. Ben Motley

    Ben Motley Supporting Actor

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    Steve, you're saying that the current meaning of the American "grand" is somehow different than before. I say emphatically that you are wrong. Could you please explain what the American "grand" does mean then? It may not be in fashion to use the term today, but it does mean, by definition and practical use, "large" or "big".
    Also, we're talking about translating movie titles. If you don't like the, in your mind, outdated word "grand" to translate an old french film's title (mind you also, the American "grand" was in fashion back then), then why not translate "Le Grande Illusion" into "The Really Really Big Smoke and Mirror Show"?
    Semantics... it's not just a job, it's an adventure. [​IMG]
     
  17. StevenA

    StevenA Second Unit

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    Ben, are you saying that if I tell you "I bought a grand knife today" my statement has precisely the same meaning as "I bought a big knife today"?

    I think the two statements have quite different connotations, and would have back in the 1930s also.
     
  18. Jason_Els

    Jason_Els Screenwriter

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    Rubbish Ben.

    'Grand' conveys the nuance of something impressive or splendid. English is not a dead language and, with luck, never shall be. Dictionaries should reflect current and popular usage of words. The Oxford realizes this as it publicizes new additions. English is not ruled by dictionaries but by the people who speak, think, and love it.

    Jason
     
  19. Ben Motley

    Ben Motley Supporting Actor

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    Steve, you still haven't told me what you're idea of the meaning of "grand" is, just what it is not. Or are you saying that the french "grande" simply means big? Yes, it could be used to mean as much, but I doubt that's the only usage of it. They french call Great Britain "Grande-Bretagne". So, are they calling Great Britain "Big Britain"? I somehow doubt that. You say it "could" refer to size. Okay, gotcha, but I'm saying it could also refer to grandeur. Hey! I wonder where that word comes from! Why, it's french, for magnitude. Could grande derive from grandeur? Of course it does, as it is simply the adjective form of the noun. And could not magnitude mean greatness in significance, as well as in size? It does.

    Jason, the definition mentions "magnificent". How is that different than impressive or splendid? The only rubbish here is your failure to understand my posts. I do in fact state that grand means magnificent.

    Grand in english, today or in the 30s, or any time in American english, or queens english for that matter, means GRAND, as in vast, immense, enormous, extreme, excessive, extravagant, exorbitant, outrageous, monstrous, towering, stupendous, astonishing, incredible, marvelous!

    What's the problem here? Does not the title of the french film mean to suggest a magnificent illusion? I cannot see how the literal translation of that title misconveys it's intended meaning at all.
     
  20. StevenA

    StevenA Second Unit

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