40+ Inch Widescreen HDTV's for Under $2,000?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JoeRiley, Jan 23, 2003.

  1. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi, I would like to get a new Widescreen HDTV that's over 40" (46-48, preferrably)... but don't want to go over $2,000 (would go slightly over though). Is there anything out there with DVI-Inputs?

    Also, what's the difference between HD-Component Inputs and normal component inputs?

    I've spent hours on sites like Bestbuy.com and Tweeter.com trying to find some, with little luck. Are there any other good sites to check on?

    Thanks!

    -Joe
     
  2. Jan Strnad

    Jan Strnad Screenwriter

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    Check OneCall.com. I got very good service from them, and they provide lots of information on sets, often including a PDF version of the set's manual.

    I have and love a 42H81 from Toshiba (last year's model). It was around $1550 delivered from OneCall.

    Jan
     
  3. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    Wow, thanks for that info Jan! I found the newer model at Best Buy for $1499.

    How important do you guys think the DVI-Input is? This one doesn't have it. About how long will it be (estimated, of course) until the DVI-In will be important?

    Also, if someone could answer the HD-Component input question I asked earlier, that would be cool.
     
  4. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Hard to say regarding DVI/HDCP. Directv has apparently started testing the technology out at the consumer level, but nobody really knows yet how or when DVI/HDCP will be used. IMHO, it will likely be an issue only for premium content and may still be another year or so away. Also, it might meet legal/regulatory challenges, and if a viable market exists, somebody will likely come out w/ convertor blackboxes for the millions of HDTVs w/out DVI/HDCP inputs.

    For myself, the main concern is w/ HD-DVD whenever that comes out since I don't care for pay-per-view and could easily go w/out premium movie channels. My guesstimate for affordable HD-DVD is maybe 5+ years away, and I'll probably be ready for a TV upgrade by that time.

    FWIW, I bought a Panny 53" recently from Best Buy for $1650--no DVI/HDCP. If there's a local BJ's near you, you should give strong consideration to the Panny 47wx42. I just heard that BJ's has it for just $1200(!). It's not as good as the Toshiba for regular TV viewing and maybe non-anamorphic DVDs, but excellent for anamorphic DVDs and HDTV. At that price, why worry about DVI/HDCP? [​IMG] Besides, the Toshiba H82 series still requires an upgrade (and extra cost) to handle DVI/HDCP.

    If you can wait til this summer, then your choices w/ DVI/HDCP will increase. The new Panny's will have DVI/HDCP at that point.

    Obviously, you should see for yourself what you like best.

    _Man_
     
  5. mike_frontier

    mike_frontier Supporting Actor

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  6. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey guys, thanks for the great advice... I found a 48" JVC with DVI-Input for $1799. I know there is no "perfect" model, but is JVC respectable in the RPTV department?

    also, I still don't get what "HD-Composite" inputs are.

    This TV has one (http://www.bestbuy.com/detail.asp?e=...t=24&scat=1470), it looks like normal composite ins, but there are black and grey inputs as well, labeled "H" and "V". Is there any difference between that and every other kind of composite inputs in most tv's?

    Thanks again!

    -------------------------
    ADDED:

    What would you guys say is the better TV:

    Panasonic: PT-53WX42 (http://www.bestbuy.com/detail.asp?e=...t=24&scat=1470)
    It says it can handle 1080i/480p.... don't all HDTV's handle the 480p too? Also, this doesn't have the DVI input.

    JVC: AV48WP30 (http://www.bestbuy.com/detail.asp?e=...t=24&scat=1470) This has the DVI input, but doesn't mention 480p. The inputs look like a lot higher quality then the Pany.

    Thanks again everyone, I really appreciate the help!
     
  7. Twisten

    Twisten Auditioning

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    To answer your (I believe that should be) "component" HD question, that means that those component inputs have enough bandwidth to handle a HD signal, as well as progressive DVD. If it also has H/V inputs then those are for horizontal and vertical sync. (together there the "digital" component inputs if you want to think about it that way). At any rate, the latest sound and vision has a pretty honest, IMO, review of the JVC set. Pretty good picture with standard and high def material, DVI...I think it's worth the money. Just my opinion.
     
  8. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    Twisten...

    How come only a few select HDTV monitors have the HD-component inputs? If normal component inputs don't handle HDTV, how can it be HDTV?
     
  9. Twisten

    Twisten Auditioning

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    You can rest assured that if it has component video inputs AND it is an HDTV monitor, that at least one of the component inputs can handle HDTV signals. Some manufacturers call it "wideband" component video, DTV-compatible, whatever... I would imagine it's all in the marketing. Also, if you look on the back of the sets themselves you'll often see that the inputs themselves will also have 480i/480p, 1080i, or whatever else to let you know what type of signal it will handle.
     
  10. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Joe,

    The JVC upconverts everything to 1080i while the Panny actually displays both 480p and 1080i. You should see for yourself whether you like the 1080i upconverted image w/ good DVDs compared to 480p on other TVs. Also, both component inputs on the Panny are HD capable. That is the set I bought.

    Anyway, if you really like the JVC more than the Panny, then go for it since the DVI/HDCP input is desirable. However, you may want to compare the JVC w/ the Panny 47" instead to be fair, and at the price that BJ's reportedly charging, the Panny 47" is a great buy. There should be a local BJ's near you:

    http://www.bjs.com/locations/index.html

    _Man_
     
  11. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for all the replies!

    Man-Fai,

    What is technically more desirable? I assume showing DVD's in it's natural 480p would be best, instead of upconverting. Now that I know that, I might stay away from the JVC and go for that 53" Panny (same price as JVC 48").


    Sorry to keep harping on this: But what does the two extra composite ins do, in the HD-Composite inputs? I just don't understand why if normal composite ins are HD-compatible, some sets have the two extra.
     
  12. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    What exactly do you mean by "two extra"? Perhaps, a link to the specific info you're quoting would help.

    Btw, I think we've been assuming you mean component, not composite. Composite input is the one that only requires 1 RCA connection usually labeled as "video" w/ yellow color-coding. Composite video is inferior to component video.

    _Man_
     
  13. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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  14. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    Can somebody please answer that last post?
     
  15. JackS

    JackS Supporting Actor

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    Guess....Horizontal & Vertical adjustment?
     
  16. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    I really don't care what the H and V stand for JackS, I want to know why they are there in some tv's, and not on others. Do they make for a better picture/why do they make for a better picture/how much better... that type of stuff.
     
  17. ChrisTG

    ChrisTG Auditioning

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    And if your set has DVI, will you still need / want a FireWire connector?

    As for the component issue, isn't it just a difference in naming convention? I haven't heard anything about various bandwidths for component video.

    Chris
     
  18. Matthew Todd

    Matthew Todd Second Unit

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    After looking at the picture, I'm guessing that the H and V inputs are for Horizontal and Vertical sync (as mentioned earlier).

    It looks like the green blue and red inputs are labeled as Y Pb Pr/GBRHV.

    I'm guessing GBRHV is the same as RGBHV. RGBHV is one step up from component inputs (Y Pb Pr).

    Most video sources won't output RGBHV, but your computer and some things like that will.

    I think most front projectors run on RGBHV (at least mine does).

    I guess the bottom line is it may be useful, especially if you'd like to feed the monitor with your computer.

    Matt
     
  19. Gary_Sc

    Gary_Sc Agent

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    Don't forget the 46" Sony. I purchased mine at Circuit City in December for about $1700.
     

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