4 styles of HDTV

Discussion in 'Displays' started by John_Graz, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. John_Graz

    John_Graz Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I know I'm a HDTV "newbie" and this has been asked in this forum very many ways, comparisons of models, etc. All I am trying to decide is which "technology of HDTV" - LCD, DLP, plasma, LCoS, CRT which is best or has the least pitfalls ? I know the price range, and size are factors but as a starting point can you throw out some "technology" + 's and - 's. I have spent the whole day reading threads here and other sites and have gotten myself in such a "quagmire of confusion" !

    My Dad just bought a 37" Vizio LCD and at first I loved it until I sat over a further angle to the side and the pictures contrast was lighter with a higher contrast and less black as when I was directly in front. So I was ready to go LCD but now I am not too sure...
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    I would start shopping by deciding on screen size.

    Different brands of LCD direct view flat panels allow different viewing angles before the picture is seen as degraded. LCD tends to have less deep black compared with the other techologies, which is more noticeable in a darker room.

    The technologies:
    CRT direct view (familiar tube type TV, max. size about 38 in.)
    CRT rear projection
    CRT front projection
    LCD direct view (flat panel)
    LCD or LCoS rear projection
    LCD or LCos front projection
    DLP rear projection
    DLP front projection
    Plasma direct view (flat panel)

    All front projection sets require a dark room for good picture quality.

    All rear projection sets have the same general space requirements although the non-CRT models are usually less deep. The CRT sets are almost always floor models while the other kinds may be either floor model or table model (without a large boxy section under the screen) Available screen sizes 40 to 75 inches.

    All rear projection sets also exhibit degrading of picture quality as you move more to the side, this also varies with model.

    Only CRT sets require periodic convergence, the projection models more so, say twice a year.

    Plasma and CRT sets should not be operated with the contrast set high otherwise permanent ghosting of static material such as stock tickers or sports broadcast framing, or of the picture boundaries on wide screen movies, can occur.

    LCD/LCOS and DLP sets are much lighter than sets of the other technologies of similar character or appearance.

    LCD/LCoS projection, and DLP, sets require a projection lamp that typically costs a few hundred to several hundred dollars to replace. Typically it lasts several thousand hours for rear projection and a few thousand hours for front projection, and the life is shortened when you turn the set back on within half an hour after the set was turned off.

    LCoS works the same way electronically as LCD, gives slightly deeper blacks, and is currently somewhat more expensive.

    All of the current consumer priced DLP models will exhibit rainbow fringed edges of subject matter which some viewers will notice more with some models.

    From best to worst in terms of deep black: CRT, plasma, DLP, LCoS, LCD.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. John_Graz

    John_Graz Stunt Coordinator

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    Which technologies have non-glare screens ? I have a 5 year old 50" Hitachi (non-HD) rear projection with a protective screen that reflects any light in the room - I even had to paint the opposite wall a dark color to stop the reflection. I will never buy another TV with a glare reflecting screen again. Since I have a 50" inch now I would like to stay that size.

    If all the HDTV technologies are still "flawed" in some way; why are the consumers still buying them ?
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    It's not that HDTVs are flawed per se, just that display devices in general always have weaknesses, and always had weaknesses. If someone didn't want a TV unless it had no flaws, they wouldn't have a TV at all. CRTs have been around for what, a hundred years? Hardly a technology without flaws. If you have a TV in your home now, it has flaws, guaranteed. Obviously you have access to the internet, which means that you have a computer which probably has a monitor, right? That has flaws too.

    Anyway, don't go looking TOO hard for all the possible flaws in an image, or you'll end up like me, with $60K worth of TV and still bitching about its flaws. [​IMG]
     
  6. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    flaw.

    Just had to say it again. What a funny word, once you type that word out that many times in a single post, is just starts sounding funny. [​IMG]
     

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