4:3 vs 16:9

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Roveen_A, Dec 20, 2003.

  1. Roveen_A

    Roveen_A Auditioning

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would like to see 4:3 and 16:9 aspect ratio screens. The reason I ask is because my projector is 4:3 native but do not know what a screen like that will look like.

    Can I calibrate a projector to display 16:9 widescreen format with a 4:3 projector?

    My dilemma is whether to keep the projector my company gave me or just purchase another one (with 16:9).

    I plan on purchasing a Dalite screen. There are so many options. In a 15'x11.5'x8' room with no windows, what screen sizes are good. I've heard from both Bob and Neil saying 96" or 100" will be good. I guess my question is, what are those dimensions for a 4:3 and 16:9?

    Thanks!!!
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 1998
    Messages:
    8,332
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    Roveen, welcome to the HTF. Take some time to read this article to familiarrize yourself with some projector basics. I know this guy personally (great person) [​IMG] Front Projection - How do I select one for my needs?

    This is what a 16x9 screen would look like ...
    [​IMG]

    Basically, it comes down to what you will watch most and what is more important to you... 4x3 source material (cable tv, older movies etc) vs 16x9 source material (dvd, satellite, Hdef etc). For me, 16x9 was a no brainer. I watch primarily dvd movies on my system but will also tap into HDef and the HDDVDformat when that arrives. A second point of consideration is the quality of the image projected. For instance, if you watch 50% 4x3 and 50% 16x9 then consider the following...

    If you have a 4x3 setup, you will have the screen filled if viewing 4x3 material. If the source is poor quality such as cable tv, then you will have a very large 100" 4x3 image of a very poor quality. Also, your better quality 16x9 material will be letterboxed within the screen. That would be a shame since the quality of the 16x9 source is better than the 4x3 source in this case.

    Some projectors can be switched from 4x3 to 16x9 and they basically mask off some of the pixels and also reduce the vertical resoluiton in the process.
     
  3. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 1998
    Messages:
    8,332
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    Here is the other advantage of a 16x9 setup... again it comes down to what you need...

    When I was looking, I considered XGA and WXGA projectors that were in my range of $$$. Consider this: Projector A is an XGA projector with a resolution of 1024x768. Projector B is a WXGA projector with a resolution of 1366x768. You have both of them set up and ready to play so you put on some dvd's.

    Scenario 1 - You pop in Toy Story 2 which has an a.r.=1.78:1. PJ#1 displays the image with black bars at the top and bottom of the image with a resolution of 1024x576. PJ#2 displays the image at the full 1366x768 (fills the scren).

    Scenario 2 - You pop in Gladiator which has an a.r.=2.35:1. PJ#1 displays the image with big black bars at the top and bottom of the image with a resolution of 1024x436. PJ#2 displays the image with smaller black bars at the top and bottom of the image with a resolution of 1366x581.

    Scenario 3 - You pop in Eagles: Hell Freezes Over which has an a.r.=1.33:1. PJ#1 displays the image at the full 1024x768 (fills the screen). PJ#2 displays the image also at 1024x768 except that the image is windowboxed, ie. has black bars to the left and right of the image.
     
  4. Drew Eckhardt

    Drew Eckhardt Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 10, 2001
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    DBS and VHS are unwatchable at the same width as DVDs (about 1.5 widths for DVDs at aspect ratios of 1.85:1 and under, and as close as 1.25 widths for good scope transfers0, and wide screen DVDs are too small to be immersive once you back up enough to have an acceptable image on those sources.

    Most DBS and VHS sources are 4:3; while DVD movies are almost entirely 1.85:1 and 2.35:1. Run a screen at 16:9 or wider and you can have both big high-quality sources and small low-quality ones.
     

Share This Page