27 or 32 inch Televisions: What is the best for $700 budget?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Jason.T, Oct 17, 2003.

  1. Jason.T

    Jason.T Auditioning

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    Just as it states. I was wondering if someone could also point out the difference between an HDTV & a regular stereo TV. With a regular stereo TV, I could definitely get a LOT better television (there a 36inch Sharp on sale at Best Buy for $549.99), but I assume the picture quality coming from a Flat, HD television set is superior.

    Any feedback would be appreciated, thanks.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Picture quality over picture quantity. A 27-inch monitor capable of both HD and progressive scanning is preferable to a 36-inch NTSC-only display (even one with a 16:9 mode).

    HD-capable sets are capable of displaying 1080i (and 480p) images; NTSC sets can only do 480i -- and at 36 inches, the picture structure (i.e., scan-line gaps) is too noticeable.
     
  3. Mathew Shelby

    Mathew Shelby Second Unit

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    Check the deals page, I think yesterday or the day before Circuit City had a special on a 32 inch standard television that could be easily turned into a 1080i set with the remote (intstructions are even included).
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Not sure what you mean there, but I think you're simply referring to an NTSC-only set that can go into 16:9 mode via the remote (i.e., user menus). This is not high definition. It is a feature that collapses the scanning-line raster into a 16:9 window for displaying 16:9-encoded (i.e., "anamorphic") DVDs at full 480-line resolution.

    A standard-type NTSC-only display cannot scan at high-def frequencies.
     
  5. Bill Will

    Bill Will Screenwriter

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    Jack, Mathew is talking about the 32" Samsung "Progressive Scan" EDTV where you can go into the service menu & turn "ON" the HDTV Circuits (Check the deals page it tells you exactly what buttons to push on the remote & what to change once your inside the menu). This is the set I would check out & you can read owner reviews on Circuit City's website & over at The Home Theater Spot.
     
  6. Mando-R

    Mando-R Stunt Coordinator

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    You can turn on the HDTV capability on the TXN3245FP set which is the EDTV 32" analog Samsung tv.

    I'm going to warn you, as I'm strongly considering buying this set as well... You had BETTER buy the extended warranty. This is a strong warning, as this product is VERY tempremental... Even the slightest mis-treatment will cause you grief.

    With a 700 dollar budget, I would strongly consider this EDTV set, or the widescreen Samsung set the 3075WHF, you can find it for about 800 Open Box, or maybe much less. This TV is TRUE HDTV, but when you use 4:3 mode, it will display a smaller image then that of a 32" regular tv. It's a trade off really.

    3075 - 30" widescreen - Bigger image when watching DVD's, smaller image when watching 4:3 material.

    32" EDTV - bigger image when watching 4:3, smaller image on DVD's.
     

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