27" Flat screen TV help - Need to know if I'm insane or have bad luck

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Bryan C, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Bryan C

    Bryan C Auditioning

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    Ok, here's my story.. [​IMG]

    I bought a 27" Sony Wega last thursday (27FS100). Brought it home, hooked it up, and for the most part it looked great. But it had some geometry issues I wasn't about to mess around with in the service menu because I'm not that comfortable with it. I figured I'd just get a different TV.

    So I returned it and got a Toshiba 27AF44 instead. Wow, was this TV dropped? It was blurrier, text on DVDs (components) and S-video games were ghosting a bit as was video from a PC I have hooked up with standard composite. My main issue was the lack of crispness though, BUT, it also had really bad geometry issues, but ONLY for gaming/pc inputs (DVD and TV were perfect though). For video games on both s-video and composite, from the PS2 and GC, there was a good 3/4" inch border where the screen wasn't being used and it definitely curved inwards towards the top. I tried running from the receiver where things are hooked up and directly to the tv - either way made no difference. The guys at Best Buy though said they saw nothing wrong with it after running tests and hooking things up. Why would my video game systems and PC cause such a problem? They blamed the wires on me, but the ghosting was with component, rca, and svideo, the geometry distortions were with s and regular, so I dobut that I happen to have 3 bad sets of cables.

    So I returned that and picked up a different Sony 27". Its geometry wasn't any better than the first Sony, and if I had to say so, it definitely was worse. What made the TV unbearable though was that when I did white grid test patterns the picture was REALLY shimmying.. shaking enough that even my gf, who normally thinks I'm making things up with regards to image quality, got ill staring at the screen. It was that noticeable. Basically anything that had white text, even the TV menu itself, was very very jumpy. I'd love to say it's my system setup or my home's power supply, but since the first 27" wega didn't have any of those issues, I guess I got another bad TV.

    At this point my back and sanity are both at their ends. Should I just wait a few months and buy another in the summer and hope it's something I can avoid? The first store is selling my old 27" wega I returned as an open-box model, so I'm thinking of just rebuying it and having a Sony rep come out to fix some of the distortions. It wasn't perfect, but after 3 TVs I think that's about the best I could do.

    I never thought spending 400 bucks was such a pain, so if anyone could help me out I'd greatly appreciate it. Sorry about the length, but just trying to get out all the information I can.
     
  2. Chad B

    Chad B Stunt Coordinator

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    Bryan,

    I have a friend who had a Panasonic 27" that had what sounds like the same simmying and shaking problem. After ISF calibration, it disappeared. The high factory contrast levels were the culprit.
    I've looked at a number of 27" TV's, including Sonys, Panasonics, and Toshibas, and they all have geometry problems. It is a product of sample to sample variation. So far, they have all been mostly correctable in the service menu. After calibration, about 80% of the geometry problems are eliminated. My 27" Panny (my bedroom TV) went from annoying for me to watch to a pleasure.
     
  3. Bryan C

    Bryan C Auditioning

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    Glad to hear I'm not alone [​IMG]

    The jumpiness definitely wasn't contrast, I put it pretty low and it was an issue no matter what. Maybe the TV just couldn't handle it.

    The service menu's just pretty daunting, things affecting other things. Guess it's just time to grab a notebook, write down some values, and play around for a bit.
     

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