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2024 At The Box Office (3 Viewers)

Tino

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Because this movie is actually better than Bad Boys 4. Bad Boys 4 is just a one-time action movie at best. And it's not very interesting.
Sure. But still I doubt anyone expected ROTK to beat it.
I'm not an expert in analytics of course, but I thought he was a better prospect.
Who’s “he”?
 

ManW_TheUncool

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This makes me wonder how Moana 2 will do later this year in what seems like a much later than usual (TDay weekend) release date for such -- I was surprised to see that release date/timeframe when I saw the trailer (for my first time) the other day while catching Inside Out 2 (in RealD 3D) w/ a friend's kid.

Of course, that's besides the (sorta) live action Mufasa apparently also coming near Christmas after that...

_Man_
 

TravisR

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This makes me wonder how Moana 2 will do later this year in what seems like a much later than usual (TDay weekend) release date for such -- I was surprised to see that release date/timeframe when I saw the trailer (for my first time) the other day while catching Inside Out 2 (in RealD 3D) w/ a friend's kid.
Disney has been releasing their animated movies around Thanksgiving for years.
 

Tino

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Movie TitleDistributorGross%LWTheatersTheaters
Change
Per
Theater
Total
Gross
Weekends In
Release
1(1)Inside Out 2Walt Disney$100,000,000-35%4,440n/c$22,523$355,183,1162
2(2)Bad Boys: Ride or DieSony Pictures$18,775,000-44%3,781-104$4,966$146,911,0003
3NThe BikeridersFocus Features$10,000,000 2,642 $3,785$10,000,0001
4(4)The Garfield MovieSony Pictures$3,600,000-24%3,013-398$1,195$85,142,0005
5(3)Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes20th Century…$3,600,000-35%2,410-190$1,494$164,396,0897
6(5)IFParamount Pi…$2,775,000-23%2,504-502$1,108$106,613,0006
7NThe ExorcismVertical Ent…$2,439,000 2,240 $1,089$2,439,0001
8NThelmaMagnolia Pic…$2,212,350 1,290 $1,715$2,212,3501
9(6)The WatchersWarner Bros.$1,940,000-45%2,423-928$801$17,748,0003
10NRite Here Rite NowTrafalgar Re…$1,408,408 341 $4,130$2,434,0471
11(7)Furiosa: A Mad Max SagaWarner Bros.$1,360,000-49%1,371-503$992$66,062,0005
12(8)The Fall GuyUniversal$1,000,000-39%1,111-552$900$90,027,0008
13NKinds of KindnessSearchlight …$350,000 5 $70,000$350,0001
14(9)The Strangers: Chapter 1Lionsgate$340,000-55%595-432$571$34,782,8806
15(-)GhostlightIFC Films$247,000+541%502+499$492$295,3532
-(-)Robot DreamsNeon$126,053+16%90+51$1,401$439,8884
-(-)I Saw the TV GlowA24$90,160-44%110-45$820$4,840,3358
-(12)TuesdayA24$71,365-76%338-316$211$637,5903
-(-)BabesNeon$53,850-55%50-48$1,077$3,654,6996
-NJanet PlanetA24$49,684 2 $24,842$49,6841
-(-)TreasureBleecker Street$46,051-83%308-342$150$511,1812
-(-)EzraBleecker Street$28,521-61%73-89$391$2,615,5614
-(-)In a Violent NatureIFC Films$19,085-80%53-150$360$4,211,5984
-(-)Civil WarA24$17,230-52%28-7$615$68,752,10311
-(-)Vampire humaniste cherche suicidaire consentant$10,338 3 $3,446$15,09225
-NGreen BorderKino Lorber$7,005 1 $7,005$7,0051
26$150,566,100
 

Adam Lenhardt

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I don’t think anyone really did. Good for show business that was in need of a huge hit.
Yeah, at this point I'm thrilled whenever a movie has a monster weekend, even when it's something I don't care anything about, because I want to see going to the cinema continue as a commercially-viable form of entertainment.
 

TravisR

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Amazing. Inside Out 2’s second weekend doubled all the other releases combined.
I figured that Inside Out 2 would have had about a 50% drop this weekend. That would have been about a $75 to $80 million second weekend which still would have been huge but everyone involved with the movie must be ecstatic with this performance.


Yeah, at this point I'm thrilled whenever a movie has a monster weekend, even when it's something I don't care anything about, because I want to see going to the cinema continue as a commercially-viable form of entertainment.
The only downside is that the message that Disney is getting is that Pixar sequels mean a billion dollars and original movies are garbage that only make hundreds of millions of dollars.
 

Malcolm R

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The only downside is that the message that Disney is getting is that Pixar sequels mean a billion dollars and original movies are garbage that only make hundreds of millions of dollars.
I'd hope they're not jumping to that conclusion just yet. Really, the only original they've put into a traditional theatrical release since the pandemic is Elemental, which did OK at nearly $500 million. Prior to that Onward was caught up in the onset of the Covid pandemic, and Soul, Luca, and Turning Red were all premieres on D+ only.

Pixar also needs to figure out, like the rest of the studios, how to make films more economically. They're still spending $200 million to make these films. Illumination spends half that, or less, on their releases and often achieves similar grosses (franchises include Minions, Despicable Me, Super Mario Bros., Migration, Sing, Secret Life of Pets). Migration was still profitable with a gross just under $300 million worldwide because they only spent about $72 million to make it. Illumination's most expensive movie over the past 15 years was Super Mario Bros at $100 million (which grossed $1.36 Billion). Most of their films cost $80 million or less.
 
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Josh Steinberg

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Pixar also needs to figure out, like the rest of the studios, how to make films more economically.

Bingo. That is the key to everything right now from theatrical tentpoles to premium streaming. The days of free money being thrown at projects without strings or expectations of returns are over.

In Disney’s specific case, they have long insisted on highly specific release dates and have been willing to spend top dollar to pay thousands upon thousands of people to work around the clock to complete projects with absurdly short turnaround times. They’re going to have to consider allowing productions more time to complete, and/or scale down how visually ambitious these projects are, in order to achieve that.

My local theater was smart with their “If” showtimes today, which we wound up seeing. They put “Inside Out 2” on as many screens as a smaller multiplex could afford to spare, and they also scheduled “If” showtimes starting shortly after IO2. When I bought our “If” tickets it was a pretty empty screening, but as IO2 showings sold out, the overflow traffic went to “If” - that was smart of them to do it that way so when they had to start turning away walk ups for IO2, they could offer another family film starting at about the same time as long as people were already there.
 

TravisR

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Bingo. That is the key to everything right now from theatrical tentpoles to premium streaming. The days of free money being thrown at projects without strings or expectations of returns are over.
I know you guys are right but Pixar is the extremely rare time that I think a blank check is earned. Every one of their movies looks amazing & have technical breakthroughs that keep their movies at the top and part of that is due to the insane budgets.
 

Josh Steinberg

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Visually I love what Pixar does more often than not, so I think in their case if they have to adjust budgets, I’d hope that they would just allow more time to make each film rather than scaling back the ambitions. If Disney would accept that some kinds of films take 3 years to make instead of trying to squeeze that into 18 months to 2 years, they could get the same product for less money.

In terms of budget bloat, someone should write a textbook on Indy 5, which was a movie that I loved but cost way too much. They reportedly spent $100 million just on the first 20 minutes, and sure, the de-aging of Harrison Ford was among the best anyone has ever done that trick, but they could have cut the sequence down, utilized camera angles that didn’t show Ford as much, and went with makeup instead of CGI for Mads Mikkelson. Ford was also injured during production and rather than pause, they plowed through to keep their release date and instead used massive amounts of digital effects to hide Ford’s injury and the extensive use of doubles. I loved the end result but if they had cut the first sequence by ten minutes and delayed the film a year, that movie could have come in at $150 million instead of $300 million.

Disney has almost forgotten how to make those kinds of decisions that don’t compromise the final product but do make them more financially viable. I hope they figure it out.
 

ManW_TheUncool

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Disney has been releasing their animated movies around Thanksgiving for years.

Guess I just hadn't been paying attention, especially around that time of year... :lol:

The only downside is that the message that Disney is getting is that Pixar sequels mean a billion dollars and original movies are garbage that only make hundreds of millions of dollars.

Yeah... and probably not just Pixar sequels, but just certain kinds of franchise flix possibly at the expense of anything else quite that good.

I actually do generally like (most) Pixar flix, but kinda meh on the Inside Out ones (both the original and this sequel) even though my expectations were definitely not high going into this sequel. I suspect I'll probably like Moana 2 much more... though not sure if I'll actually see that in a theater.

I know you guys are right but Pixar is the extremely rare time that I think a blank check is earned. Every one of their movies looks amazing & have technical breakthroughs that keep their movies at the top and part of that is due to the insane budgets.

I don't know. Feels like Pixar had become less consistent/reliable and been going downhill a fair bit in recent years...

_Man_
 

Jake Lipson

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Disney has been releasing their animated movies around Thanksgiving for years.
Yeah. I think Disney would ideally like to have a major Walt Disney Animation Studios film release every year at Thanksgiving until the sun burns out if they can manage that.

This is such a common time frame for them that the two most recent Disney Animation releases that did not release at Thanksgiving are Zootopia (March 2016) and Raya and the Last Dragon (March 2021.) Zootopia went in March because Pixar had The Good Dinosaur in November 2015. Raya was originally intended for November 2020 but went in March because of Covid delays. Naturally, Zootopia 2 is occupying the Thanksgiving release slot next year.
 
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Malcolm R

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Visually I love what Pixar does more often than not, so I think in their case if they have to adjust budgets, I’d hope that they would just allow more time to make each film rather than scaling back the ambitions. If Disney would accept that some kinds of films take 3 years to make instead of trying to squeeze that into 18 months to 2 years, they could get the same product for less money.
Agree. Their spending may result in films that are visually stunning and at the forefront of animation technology, but if they're so expensive as to be unprofitable based on a reasonable box office gross, it's hard to pay for your staff salaries and studio overhead to keep making the films. Not every film is going to gross over a billion dollars and you can't run a studio expecting that's going to be the result every time. Those instances should be pleasant surprises, not a bar below which the film is considered a "failure".

That's why I used Illumination as an example. They seem to have found that sweet spot where they can make slick, entertaining films that audiences respond to, while keeping costs reasonable and reaching profitability without each film needing to be a massive billion-dollar blockbuster. If you spend $80-100 million, you can break even at $250-300 million worldwide.

One would also think that Pixar has been doing these films long enough that there would be some savings or economies of scale realized in the refinement of the technologies and process. That never seems to happen as they've been spending around $200 million per film for years and years.
 
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