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2021 TV DVD Guesses? (1 Viewer)

Randy Korstick

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Maybe. It depends on whether they think there are too many episodes to make it viable.
The show is still pretty popular with those who remember it and with the current popularity of Marvel it would make it a decent seller even with more seasons.
 

jcroy

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The show is still pretty popular with those who remember it and with the current popularity of Marvel it would make it a decent seller even with more seasons.

If Universal still has the rights and/or owns the bixby version, then perhaps it might be outsourced to Mill Creek for bluray?
 

jcroy

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I have no idea why you feel that way. But I disagree. The thing is that we all feel a nostalgic glow when thinking about the things we grew up with that we liked, and mercifully forget the things from then that were terrible. I mean, do you really think that every single series made today is worse than My Mother, the Car? Even if you limit it to just sitcoms?

There are plenty of TV shows from the 50s, 60s, and 70s that are as good as anything made today, but there was also a lot of dross. And while there are a lot of shows made today that are bad, or even merely "OK", there are some that are as good as, or better than anything made back when.

I've been a TV viewer since the late 50s, but I can honestly say without the least bit of hesitation that I think The Wire is the best TV show I've ever watched. Of any genre, not specifically police drama. On the other hand, Naked City is my pick for second place in the latter category. And as much as I loved most of the SF TV of my youth, I don't think any of it is as good as The Expanse. Except maybe The Twilight Zone, but even in the 150+ episodes of that show, there was a lot of crap.

But that's me. I think every decade has good shows and bad shows, excellent shows and terrible shows. And no decade is better or worse than any other.

(In addition).

In practice, I've found that my tastes also change with time.

Back in the day, I did like watching the original Hawaii Five-O in reruns. (The clothing fashions and hairstyles were not entirely atrocious and laughable).

When the reboot was first announced in 2010, my initial knee-jerk reaction is that it was utter crap.

Fast forward to the the present, I found I liked the rebooted Hawaii Five-0 a lot more than the original Jack Lord version.
 

JamesSmith

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It’s just different, and personal taste plus familiarity tends to color how we view things.

Television in the 1960s and 1970s was essentially episodic, with each episode usually telling a complete story and resetting the status quo by the end. You ended up spending a lot of time with series regular characters that don’t change much, if all, giving shows a reliable consistency and familiar voice.

Television today tends to be serialized and not as interested in maintaining a status quo. They tend to follow characters that do change over time and rarely focus on inconsequential moments in a character’s life.

As one brief example, that meant when you watched Star Trek in the 60s, you were tuning in to see the same characters take the same approach to similar dilemmas and quickly solving them by the end of the hour. When you watch a new Star Trek show today, you’re generally following one story that’s told over a dozen episodes, a story that represents a moment of major importance for those characters. The status quo doesn’t reset at the end of the episode because the story continues throughout the season. Though the payoffs are often greater this way, it also asks for more investment from the audience in the story.

It’s sort of the difference between a bunch of short stories involving the same characters vs chapters of a novel.

I enjoy both methods of storytelling but the pendulum has definitely swung from one extreme to the other.
Great Analysis, Josh.
--jthree
 

Purple Wig

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Well, of course "better" is a subjective thing, Alan, though I do agree with you in that I just plain like older shows quite a bit more than most modern shows, and pre-'90s series make up 95% or more of my disc collecting.

I concede that quite a few modern series are extremely well made, and some of them (stuff like Deadwood, Justified, The Mandalorian, Endeavour, etc.) are real favorites of mine. But I find that, generally speaking, I get a lot more pure enjoyment out of older shows these days, for a variety of reasons, including (as Josh references above) a growing tiredness with serialized "arc" storytelling. Serialized storytelling works very well with certain shows, but it is an overused device these days, IMO, and lends many series a "soapy" aspect that I find somewhat tiresome. But it does seem to be the preferred model for current audiences.
I agree with most of what you say here, and add that I wasn't entirely serious...but on the other hand, somebody has to take a stand! :)

There are plenty of newer shows I like, but my preference overall is the 50's to 70's. Aside from the individual programs, I'd cite better dialogue, better characters, more inventive production techniques (not production values, even the most low budget and haphazard have a vitality lacking in many of the cold, modern, programs of today).

I can't remember the exact quote but I liked what Patrick McGoohan said about his refusal to (curse? do explicit love scenes?) on television, that he was an invited guest into people's living rooms.

Someone mentioned laughing at the old fashions, which is again subjective. I know a lot of people that think the hairstyles, fashion, architecture, cars, etc of older decades are more aesthetically pleasing. A friend once told me the bums of Dragnet have more panache than most people today.

I don't think nostalgia is a universal explanation. I grew up in the 70's and many of those shows I can watch an episode or 2 of before losing interest, whereas a show from the 50's or 60's will often grab me. The Fugitive was a "new" show to me in the late 80's, having never been rerun in my area...couldn't get enough of it, whereas current late 80's programming wasn't of little interest.

A female friend was recently telling me how much she liked Streets of San Francisco, which she didn't remember ever having seen before. She said everything about it, from the scenery, colors, fashions, background, was pleasing to the eye, and the characters were great. But we've had many conversations about how people on old shows actually seem to care about each other and on new shows it's usually putdowns or negative emotions.

I can't say Cannon is a better show than Breaking Bad, but William Conrad is as fine as actor as any, and an hour spent in his presence is preferable to a harrowing and (to me) depressing one.

The lack of interesting theme songs, title sequences, end credits are all a drag.

A show like Treme did have good characters, but didn't last long enough.

And at this point I will cease rambling. :)
 

Randy Korstick

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If Universal still has the rights and/or owns the bixby version, then perhaps it might be outsourced to Mill Creek for bluray?
I don't think Mill Creek has a Universal deal anymore. Its been awhile since they released a universal show. I think they would have released this show a couple years ago if they could have. Kino has mentioned a new Universal show and this one fits them. Especially after recently releasing Buck Rogers.
 
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jcroy

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The lack of interesting theme songs, title sequences, end credits are all a drag.

In terms of theme songs, there were some which were very iconic:

- the original Knight Rider
- the original MacGyver
- the original Magnum PI
- the original Hawaii Five-O
- the original Dallas
- the original Dynasty
- Fringe end credits (not the opening theme)
- CSI franchise (if you're a fan of The Who)
- The Big Bang Theory (if you're a fan of The Barenaked Ladies)
- The Jeffersons
- etc ...

Some reboot/revived shows kept the original iconic theme music, such as Magnum PI, Hawaii Five-0, Dallas, etc ..., while other reboots didn't really (ie. MacGyver, Dynasty, etc ...).
 

Rick Thompson

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I don't think the best of the 70s is any better than the best of today, but the standard run of shows (such as the non-Fugitive QM shows) was much better then. Of course, if you want to see real junk, check out the British shows we don't get. We get Masterpiece Theatre and such, but the other stuff, omigod!
 

bmasters9

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I don't think the best of the 70s is any better than the best of today, but the standard run of shows (such as the non-Fugitive QM shows) was much better then. Of course, if you want to see real junk, check out the British shows we don't get. We get Masterpiece Theatre and such, but the other stuff, omigod!

I take it you don't like Downton Abbey, among other things.
 

JamesSmith

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I

There are plenty of newer shows I like, but my preference overall is the 50's to 70's. Aside from the individual programs, I'd cite better dialogue, better characters, more inventive production techniques (not production values, even the most low budget and haphazard have a vitality lacking in many of the cold, modern, programs of today).

I can't remember the exact quote but I liked what Patrick McGoohan said about his refusal to (curse? do explicit love scenes?) on television, that he was an invited guest into people's living rooms.

I can't say Cannon is a better show than Breaking Bad, but William Conrad is as fine as actor as any, and an hour spent in his presence is preferable to a harrowing and (to me) depressing one.

The lack of interesting theme songs, title sequences, end credits are all a drag.
And at this point I will cease rambling. :)
Purple Wig if you don't mind me adding on. God Bless Patrick McGoohan. He's been gone for awhile, but I've come to appreciate him more and more. The symbolism on the final episode of the Prisoner makes more and more sense to me now. Granted, it isn't always logical, but he was trying to say several things at the same time for the conclusion, and I think that's the best he could do. He was a great family man, and had integrity. Heavens! What he must have thought of today's television? I have no interest in meeting current actors, but I would have loved to have met any of the Bonanza actors, William Conrad, Mr. McGoohan, and others.

Their characters weren't all dark, like as in todays programming. They were a mix. Perhaps some characters in the fifties and sixties were too goody-goody, but now they're they're all totally cynical and jaded.

I really hope more unreleased lost shows from the fifties to seventies may make it out in some form, because I liked the actors and writing. Really want to see Governor and JJ, Manhunter (Ken Howard) and other such series.

==jthree
 

bmasters9

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A female friend was recently telling me how much she liked Streets of San Francisco, which she didn't remember ever having seen before. She said everything about it, from the scenery, colors, fashions, background, was pleasing to the eye, and the characters were great. But we've had many conversations about how people on old shows actually seem to care about each other and on new shows it's usually putdowns or negative emotions.

Stone and Keller, IMO, really did care about each other-- Stone was personally invested in helping his partner Keller become a better detective, and just as Stone became an unofficial father figure to Keller, so did Malden do the same w/Douglas.
 

jayembee

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Of course, if you want to see real junk, check out the British shows we don't get. We get Masterpiece Theatre and such, but the other stuff, omigod!

Back in my Usenet newsgroups days, I used to follow (among other things) a British TV newsgroup (about, by, and for Brits), and it was constantly full of Brits claiming that American TV was sooooooo much better than British TV. Americans thought the opposite. And that was partly due to two things, in my estimation:

(1) What we got here in the US for British TV was the cream of the crop. We didn't see the bad stuff.

(2) Familiarity breeds contempt, the grass is always greener on the other side, and other such bon mots helped everyone -- on both sides of the Atlantic -- dislike their own stuff and love the others'.
 

jcroy

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(2) Familiarity breeds contempt, the grass is always greener on the other side, and other such bon mots helped everyone -- on both sides of the Atlantic -- dislike their own stuff and love the others'.

That mentality predates TV. In David Tomlinson and Helen Reddy's respective memoirs, they both talked about how they preferred American movies to the ones made in their home countries.

This can also happen with stuff which is completely independent of any geographical/temporal context.

As a prominent example, I always thought the stuff my parents/grandparents watched and/or listened to was crap. Back in the day, it was a lot of videotapes, vinyl records, cassettes, etc ... of stuff in german, yiddish/hebrew, etc ... (Nowadays it would be cable channels or youtube videos).

So for the longest time, any time I came across any shows/movies/music in german or hebrew/israeli, my immediate knee-jerk reaction was that it was automatically crap.
 

Darby67

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Purple Wig if you don't mind me adding on. God Bless Patrick McGoohan. He's been gone for awhile, but I've come to appreciate him more and more. The symbolism on the final episode of the Prisoner makes more and more sense to me now. Granted, it isn't always logical, but he was trying to say several things at the same time for the conclusion, and I think that's the best he could do. He was a great family man, and had integrity. Heavens! What he must have thought of today's television? I have no interest in meeting current actors, but I would have loved to have met any of the Bonanza actors, William Conrad, Mr. McGoohan, and others.

Their characters weren't all dark, like as in todays programming. They were a mix. Perhaps some characters in the fifties and sixties were too goody-goody, but now they're they're all totally cynical and jaded.

I really hope more unreleased lost shows from the fifties to seventies may make it out in some form, because I liked the actors and writing. Really want to see Governor and JJ, Manhunter (Ken Howard) and other such series.

==jthree

JThree:

I am huge fan of Patrick McGoohan as well! I absolutely love the complete series sets of The Prisoner and Danger Man that I have on my shelf and watch episodes of both series frequently. I also enjoyed him in The Three Lives of Thomasina, Ice Station Zebra, Mary, Queen of Scots, Silver Streak, The Man in the Iron Mask, and Braveheart. But my all-time favorite Patrick McGoohan role was Dr. Syn in The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh, a holy grail title for me that Disney finally released as a Walt Disney Treasures set in 2008.

Sean
 

Purple Wig

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JThree:

I am huge fan of Patrick McGoohan as well! I absolutely love the complete series sets of The Prisoner and Danger Man that I have on my shelf and watch episodes of both series frequently. I also enjoyed him in The Three Lives of Thomasina, Ice Station Zebra, Mary, Queen of Scots, Silver Streak, The Man in the Iron Mask, and Braveheart. But my all-time favorite Patrick McGoohan role was Dr. Syn in The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh, a holy grail title for me that Disney finally released as a Walt Disney Treasures set in 2008.

Sean
I’ve been meaning to watch a 1979 film called the Hard Way, which I’d never heard of but stumbled across on tubi. Patrick McGoohan and Lee Van Cleef...interesting combination.
 

Jeff Flugel

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I really need to pick up The Prisoner one of these days. I saw the show a few years ago and while it’s not at the very top tier for me, it’s good enough, interesting enough and weird enough to be worth revisiting.

Josh, I also heartily recommend Patrick McGoohan's earlier series, Danger Man. It's not as groundbreaking, mindbending or surreal as The Prisoner, but for my money it is a better - and certainly more consistent - series overall...and McGoohan is equally compelling in both shows, a truly electric screen presence.
 

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