2000 dollars (US) to spend... no ideas.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Parris, Sep 10, 2002.

  1. John Parris

    John Parris Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I keep going back and forth between projector, RPTV, and direct view set... Ive got about 2000 US$ to spend...

    I would use this a LOT (hours daily), so I dont think a projector would be practical because of lamp life issues... My one big constraint is that whatever I get MUST be 4:3 or at least capable of reproducing undistorted 4:3 images for my Star Trek DVDs.

    I had another thread about RPTVs, as I think a decent 4:3 RPTV is my best option for my price range / restraints, but I'd like to open my options to include everything in the price range, so if you think i should go with a direct view set or a projector, feel free to chime in.

    Size is not an issue for me, really... bigger than 32" would be preferable, again, this is why I was thinking of an RPTV... any and all ideas welcome.
     
  2. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    36xbr800 or 36hs500 if you can't squeeze out the extra couple hundred. You can also go with a RPTV but I suggest you go with a 16x9 if you go RP. Most if not all now days can give you an undistorted 4x3 image.
     
  3. John Parris

    John Parris Stunt Coordinator

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    Every 16x9 ive seen simply stretches the 4:3 picture... looks awful. Is there some feature I'm not familiar with?
     
  4. Rich Wenzel

    Rich Wenzel Supporting Actor

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    some of the panasonics in the 2k rptv range are really good values for the money...

    also, i would save the $600 and get the tau over the wega if i was going to get the tube tv...

    good luck

    rich
     
  5. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    Toshiba 36HFX71 beautiful set, direct view glory 4:3 with that wonderful squeeze... and it gives a better cable signal than the sony's... I know I love my set and dont regret buying it.
     
  6. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  7. Jan Strnad

    Jan Strnad Screenwriter

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  8. Gil D

    Gil D Supporting Actor

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    Take a few of your Star Trek DVD's with you to the store (include the best looking, a favorite, and the worst looking). Ask the salesman to move around a dvd player to each set so that you can. Tweeter will definitely do this for you, maybe CC if it's not busy. Not sure what dvd player you have, but you may want to try progressive via component input (something like Pannie RP62 or Tosh model#?).

    You or the salesman are going to have to tweak the user settings on the sets to get the best picture (usually turning down contrast, sharpness, turn off VSM, set color temp, etc).

    Try the 32-36" HD Ready direct views and the 50-53" HD-Ready RPTVs. These (HD Ready) should give a better pic on dvd but may not look as good on cable due to the line doubling of less than perfect analog signal. These should be priced around $2K and your ready for HD as long as the set has the 16:9 vertical squeeze.

    Now what happens when you tire of those Star Trek dvd's?

    Live long and prosper.
     
  9. Ron Boster

    Ron Boster Screenwriter

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    Why not go with a FP (DLP or LCD)you can get both a 16x9 or 4:3 image with the proper letterboxing, but no burn-in. The Panny AE100 sells for $1,400 from Price Japan. You can buy a used screen for about $400 or go the DYI route.

    Good Luck
    Ron
     
  10. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  11. John Parris

    John Parris Stunt Coordinator

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    First of all, thanks loads for all the feedback.
     
  12. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  13. John Parris

    John Parris Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, considering my viewing of 4:3 and 16:9 is about half and half (maybe a little more 4:3), burn-in is a serious issue in either event... I'm liking the idea of a projector more and more -- there are no burn in issues with FP, correct?
     
  14. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    No burn in issues with digital FP. CRT's still exhibit phosphor burn.
     
  15. Ron Boster

    Ron Boster Screenwriter

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    John: If you want to research the AE100 go to www.avsforum.com under FP's under 5k and do a search. You will find a ton of info. I would think enough to form an opinion. You also might want to post a request for a fellow member and owner of the AE100 to provide a demo in your region of the states.
    Ron
     
  16. Mark Lehmkuhl

    Mark Lehmkuhl Stunt Coordinator

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    You have to ask yourself if a front projector is practical for you, for everyday tv watching. The room must be quite dark during the day for you to see it. The bulbs are expensive to replace (usually $200 and up). Do you have kids (they could reap havoc on an exposed and reachable projector).

    I am an advocate of not spending alot of $$ on a tv broadcast watching tube today. Most material is 4:3 and will be for years, so for tv a widescreen is a waste. It is great though for movies.

    How often do you replace your tv? CRT-based tv's are the only affordable (by 90% of most people's standards) technology today. In a couple years, plasma, DLP, LCOS, and other technologies that are far better than CRT will be affordable. CRT is at the beginning of the end, although they will be around for years to come, just like VCR's.

    If you are going to keep the tv for say 10 years an you won't be tempted to buy the better technology a few years down the road, get yourself a nice big widescreen CRT RPTV.

    If you will want the newer and improved technology in a few years, and you are not made of $$, then get something less expensive (relative term only you can fix a price tag on), and in a few years buy the better hdtv technology when broadcasts switch to all hdtv, move the current tv into a spare room.
     
  17. Jan Strnad

    Jan Strnad Screenwriter

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  18. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    The PT-AE100u's bulbs currently cost $250 and last 5000 hours, giving you a current cost of 5 cents per hour. If you watch 4 hours of TV a day for 6 days a week EVERY week of the year, a single bulb will still last you over 4 years. Chances are, in 4 years, the price of these bulbs will drop below the $200 mark.


    If you cannot afford a cost of 4 to 5 cents per hour on a $200-250 bulb that should last you over 4 years, FP is not for you.
     
  19. Lou Sytsma

    Lou Sytsma Producer

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    Check out some of the NEC LT150s in the Hardware For Sale forum here.

    These are amazing little projectors - own one myself.

    As with any projector you need to demo it. Each type has it's limitations - with DLP you might see rainbows.

    The move to FP was the best thing I have ever done. I kept my TV for regular viewing.
     
  20. John Parris

    John Parris Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks again for the posts. [​IMG]
    All the little conscerns like kids, non-critical viewing, etc. are not issues. I have no kids, and this would only be for when I want to seriously sit down and enjoy something... I'll be watching most of my cable broadcasts and the occasional dvd and whatnot on my current 27" CRT, so I'm thinking a projector might actually work. No SAF here either, so I can always put up REALLY dark drapes, etc. for the viewing room.
    As far as connection, I'll probably end up going the HTPC route, so a high-res VGA would be available there...
    I'm really sold on the idea of a projector... I just need to check some out, because I'm still really skeptical of the quality of some of the low-end ones.
     

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