2 Dumb, but interesting questions!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brad_W, Jan 19, 2002.

  1. Brad_W

    Brad_W Screenwriter

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    1. Would I ruin any of my epuipment if I took a y-adapter and plugged into my subwoofer input and connected a subwoofer on each connection thus running two subwoofers out of the same input?

    2. Again, would I ruin any of my equipment if I connected speakers within speakers? What I mean is, if I were to take some speaker wire and connected to my main speaker (which is already connected to my reciever) and use that wire to connect another speaker, would that ruin anything?

    Like I said, dumb, but interesting questions.
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    1.) No problem. Using a "Y" adaptor is a common way to run signals to dual subs.

    2.) Problem: Speaker wires carry power (unlike the LFE output). Hook it up wrong and you burn out your amp.

    Parallel Connection: If you wire the red post to the red jacks on all your speakers, and the black post to the black jacks on all your speakers - this is called a parallel connection. Each parallel connection makes the receiver "see" a smaller and smaller impedence and becomes a short-circuit.

    Series Connection: Think of the signal like a water pipe coming out the red post on your receiver. Run it to the red input on speaker 1, out the black post on speaker 1 to the red input on speaker 2, eventually making its way back to the black post on the receiver. This is called a series connection.

    The safest thing to do is to buy a inexpensive "Speaker Selector" that allows you to hook up several speakers to a single output, but prevents short-circuits.
     
  3. Brad_W

    Brad_W Screenwriter

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  4. Gary Silverman

    Gary Silverman Stunt Coordinator

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    Speaking of speaker selectors(no pun intended), does anyone know much about them? I would like one to attach to my main speaker output, that when running my mains only, would not pass the signal through the electronics in the selector. I'm concerned with degrading the signal, but I would tolerate a little degradation when running the second or third pair.(Am I being too picky?)

    Oh, my Denon receiver doesn't have a B output for the mains.
     
  5. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Gary: Yes, there ARE signals that are sensitive to extra branches/components attached. But there are 2 main differences:

    - These signals are in the kilo/Mega hz range (video/microwave) Audio signals are 20-20,000 hz range - not a problem

    - It's the electronics attached to the wires that are sensitive to reflections in the signals, the extra circuity is not really "damaging" the signal.

    So dont worry too much about the extra circuitry in a speaker selector box.

    What I think you get with the cheap vs expensive ones are more resistors so that as you switch 1/2/3 sets of speakers into the circuit, your receiver tends to see a fairly steady load. Also, the knobs/buttons are guranteed to not cause a short if you try and mash them down part way with the more expensive units. (I saw a Niles switcher for $100 that had a $5,000 warrenty that they would replace your amp if it ever caused a short.)

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    I own a $35 Radio Shack speaker selector that I bought 4 1/2 years ago to switch the mains between the den (home theater room), living room and kitchen. It works pretty well. I seem to no longer have the "manual" which came with it but I believe that depending on what combination (it could switch 4) you choose, the load on your receiver changes (the impedance changes). Since we normally only pick one (sometimes two) rooms at once and don't listen at high volumes, the receiver has handled it fine.

    I'd be interested to know what other speaker switch boxes people use.

    cheers,

    --tom
     

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