2.35:1 on 16:9 set causing burn-in too?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Susilo, Aug 5, 2002.

  1. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    I know, I know, this topic is being discussed to death. Logically anything that is NOT 16:9 will cause burn in on a 16:9 RPTV.

    Just want to know how severe is it going to be? Should be just as bad as playing 4:3 image and/or station logo, no?
     
  2. Ken Garrison

    Ken Garrison Supporting Actor

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    I think this Burn in thing has gone too far. I play letterbox movies all the time on my 19 inch direct view TV with the contrast FULL BLAST. Why don't I get burn in? Does this mean that the newer CRTs are lower in quality than the cheaper ones? I never get burn in on the TVs I want letterbox on. I had 2 movies in a row going on in my bedroom on my 19 inch. And no, it didn't burn in at all. I know, I've seen burn in on the big screens at Sears. But why does it happen more often to the expensive TVs and not the cheap assed smaller TVs with lower resolution?
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    David, you can greatly reduce the chances of image burn-in by adjusting the white and black levels to appropriately low settings. But I think you know that. The danger of burn-in always exists when wider-aspect ratio films are shown on a 16:9 display, but by taking precautions the chances of this are reduced. JB
     
  4. Leif Wall

    Leif Wall Second Unit

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    Ken - direct view and rear projection tvs are totally different. It's like compaing apples and oranges.
     
  5. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    Jack,

    I'm just a paranoid dude. I will ISF my TV as soon as it arrives and will do so annually just like any other direct views in my studio. The thing is that this HDTV will be my first RPTV although I already have two other direct-view HDTVs.

    Nothing is going to change my mind in getting my 42" RPTV, just maybe my viewing habit.

    I will, definitely use the stretch mode for regular TV viewing (which is about 4x 30 minutes a week). However, many of my DVDs and LDs are in 2.35:1 ratio. Should I watch two to three of these movies a week, will I wreck my RPTV? (considering the brightness and contrast have been calibrated as per ISF standard).
     
  6. Craig

    Craig Second Unit

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    You'll have to adjust contrast & brightness to your particular viewing situation & TV. What's right for someone else may be too dark or too bright for your environment.

    I've had a widescreen TV since 12/99. I've probably watched 500 DVDs, with the majority being 2.35 films, and I can't see any burn in. I've got my contrast a bit higher than a lot of people, around 40%, because that's what looks best to me.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much. You'll get years of enjoyment from the TV.
     
  7. Dmitry

    Dmitry Supporting Actor

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  8. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    What kind of image should I be playing during that break-in period? I know that it has to be a screen-filling image, but should it be animate (movie), or coloured screen (completely blue, completely green, etc)?
     
  9. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    David,
    During break-in, just watch normal stuff, not all one color at a time or anything like that. Do avoid bright, contrasty, station ID "bugs" that stay on the screen a long time, or the graphics on CNN and other news channels.

    Do an AVIA calibration right away, and redo it once in a while for the first couple of months, then get it ISF'd if you feel the need.

    Try to relax and enjoy your new set.
     
  10. David Susilo

    David Susilo Screenwriter

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    Thank you guys for calming my panic. I feel much better with my upcoming RPTV now. I'll be receiving it on Wednesday, hope everything goes well.
     

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