192KHz High Rez Audio Input

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jason Garrett, Jan 7, 2003.

  1. Jason Garrett

    Jason Garrett Stunt Coordinator

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    Newbie question here, does it matter which analog input I choose for the 192KHz DVD-A. I'm using an Onkyo TX-SR700, Panasonic CP-72, and 5 Ascend CBM-170's with no sub. For some reason I perceive better sound from the "Analog" input vs. the "Multichannel." Is there any difference?

    Could somebody give me a specific example to look for on Hotel California DVD-A 2 channel high rez vs the CD that really demonstrates the improvement? Is there a point in a song that it really shines? I'd like to appreciate the new technology, but it's not as apparent to me as say the composite video to s-video upgrade. Maybe my really cheap Wal-Mart cables are nullifying the DVD-A capabilities or I could be partially deaf from my late 80's days with 6 15" woofers behind my head in a Mustang.

    After a couple of days with the DVD-A I do enjoy the surround tracks of Hotel California more than I did at first. I needed to set up the speaker delay and guess at the levels to make it sound better. I was expecting something really far out after seeing how trippy DPL II was on my 2 channel cd's. DVD-A is cool..... I mean it seemed like I could hear Don Henley's breath from my left rear surround on "The Last Resort" as he sang. The surround tracks are all very nice. To me they seem to project a better surround experience than the DTS or Dolby surround tracks. The DVD-A seems to come from everywhere while the DTS and Dolby seem too concentrated on the speakers they come from. Please forgive my lack of knowledge for proper terminology.

    Great thanks to this forum as a reference to home audio!
     
  2. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

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    Jason,

    First off, welcome to High-Res Audio.

    Now, as to what sounds better, trust your ears.

    I'm assuming that you have the stereo inputs set to direct, which would leave them purely analog. Is this the case?

    Also, make sure you're doing the same for the multi-channel input.

    I'm also glad to see you are enjoying immersive surround mixes!

    Regards,
     
  3. Jason Garrett

    Jason Garrett Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, I don't have the stereo inputs connected (Left/Right 2 channel). I'm using the 6 channel analog input for everything (aside from the optical for dd and dts). I read that the front left/right outputs are identical between the two. Is that correct?

    Hold on....... sitting closer to the speakers makes the multichannel sound a little better. I'm really on the fence between the two, but I see that only the multichannel input restricts the dsp processing. The analog imput allows for dsp modes so it must mean that the signal is being digitized again through analog inputs? I guess this is bad? The multichannel allows "pure audio", "direct" with the receiver reading "tone off" and the "surround" mode makes the receiver display "tone on." Now I wonder what that means.

    Thanks for the reply.
     
  4. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

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    Jason,

    Tone On means input is being digitized so that the tone controls can be engaged.

    Direct means no processing, only volume control.

    You should have a direct mode for an analog input, which does no A/D.

    When you said "Analog" vs. "Multichannel", I was going on the (now proven to be incorrect) assumption that you were using 2 different inputs. My bad.

    Regards,
     

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