16:9 tv's and 4:3 material

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Sean Patrick, Dec 12, 2001.

  1. Sean Patrick

    Sean Patrick Supporting Actor

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    i'm about to buy a 16:9 tv and today after buying the REBECCA special edition dvd, i was thinking about future problems i'd have enjoying many of the 1.33:1 material i own on dvd. If i get a progressive scan player like the RP91, how will 4:3 dvd's get displayed on a widescreen tv without cropping or stretching (and without grey bars!)

    are there any 16:9 tv's that handle this problem better than others?

    thanks!
     
  2. Keith Gereghty

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    I have the same problem with this Sean, but am leaning towards a 16x9 in the near future. I have many old movies and am getting many tv shows for my collection. My reasoning is this: Close to all the 1:33:1 has been produced and most films since the 50's and many TV shows are being shot in widescreen which will be the aspect ratio from now on. This means if you are a purist you may have to keep a regular tv around for some time or get used the the side bars or strech mode. Stretch mode is getting better...the new Sony 16x9 direct view does a terrific job, but it is also only 34" and $4000!!!!!

    So, to answer your question I have not encountered a tv that can do both 1:33:1 AND 16x9 justice on the same set. Many will no doubt disagree. You will eventually have to choose which format you will view the most and for me this will ultimatly be widescreen.
     
  3. Dwight Amato

    Dwight Amato Stunt Coordinator

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    I have the 47" Panasonic, and with a RP91 (I have the JVC65) you can watch full screen movies in progressive scan in a 4x3 window with black bars on the side. If you can live with them on the top and bottom you can live with them on the side...
     
  4. Matt_Marlow

    Matt_Marlow Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree that it's worth getting the RP91 or one of the JVCs for this reason alone. They look so much better with black bars than gray. I believe the new Toshiba progressive scan players also scale 4:3 material so that there are black bars on the sides. I don't think they auto-scale non-anamorphic widescreen movies like the RP91 and JVCs do, though.
     
  5. Richard Kim

    Richard Kim Producer

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    The side bars are grey for a reason. They're there to protect your TV from burn in. Black bars will speed this process.

    If the grey bars bother you so much, just make yourself some homemade mattes and attach them to your TV when watching 4:3 material.
     
  6. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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  7. Sean Patrick

    Sean Patrick Supporting Actor

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    wel, hopefully burn-in won't be TOO much of an issue for me since i intend to watch any DBS programming either stretched or cropped. It's DVD's with an INTENDED aspect ratio of 4:3 that i'm worried about. Sounds like an RP-91 is a must buy for me when i take the 16:9 plunge.

    now i just have to decide which TV to get ! (going back and forth between the new Toshibas, Hitachis, RCA 16:9 tube, Pioneers - arghhhh!!)

    thanks for the info.
     
  8. Matt_Marlow

    Matt_Marlow Stunt Coordinator

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    I find it odd that people act like they're afraid of burn-in from watching 4:3 DVDs with black vertical bars, yet the majority of DVDs are 2.35:1 (horizontal bars), around 60% or more. If you're like most people, you'll have only a handful of 4:3 DVDs compared to a large percentage of 2.35:1 DVDs, so what is the big deal with wanting to watch them without the annoying gray bars? If anything, uneven screen wear is going to occur from 2.35:1 movies LONG before any damage would be done from 1.33:1 films. Notice I'm only referring to DVDs and not regular TV. Personally I think one of the stretch modes works better for viewing regular TV, as opposed to the gray bars.

    Anyway, if you want to watch your 4:3 DVDs with black bars, you'll need either a Panasonic RP91, any of the JVC progressive scan models, one of the new Toshibas (3755, 4700, etc.) or a Malata (which supposedly has better scaling than any of the other ones).
     
  9. JasonKrol

    JasonKrol Supporting Actor

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    or, most widescreen tvs now have a pretty advanced Service Mode you can enter..if your brave.

    my toshiba 50h81 has gray bars..but I know you can change the contrast of the bars via the Service Mode, and you can ultimately make the gray bars black by making the contrast 0 (or something like that..maybe its not contrast..but I know you can hack it and make the gray black)

    just another suggestion..instead of spending a ton more for the RP91 just to have black bars..when the RP56 is much cheaper.
     
  10. Sean Patrick

    Sean Patrick Supporting Actor

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    well i'm interested in the RP91 because of it's scaling abilities of other non-anamorphc dvds. i think for the price range i'm in, it's the only option.
     
  11. Dwight Amato

    Dwight Amato Stunt Coordinator

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    The JVC can be had for $220 in nearly every store.
     
  12. Matt_Marlow

    Matt_Marlow Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah, the RP91 is far from being the only option if scaling is what you're interested in. In fact, you can get a JVC 7 disc changer with progressive scan, dvd audio, on board dd and dts decoding, pal to ntsc conversion, etc. for around $350. The RP91 was probably the first DVD player on the market (mainstream player, anyway) to offer scaling of non-anamorphic DVDs, which is part of the reason for its popularity. But you should consider other players, too. Also, the JVCs don't have any trouble displaying 4:3 material like the RP91 sometimes does.
     

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