16:9 projectors

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Sacha_C, Feb 1, 2003.

  1. Sacha_C

    Sacha_C Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2003
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I was thinking... Why would anyone want a 16:9 projector? That would mean for 4:3 videos/games you coudn't use the entire width of the screen, but with a 4:3 projector you can use the entire screen's width for both 4:3 and 16:9.

    So, unless someone would watch only 16:9 movies, why would anyone want a 16:9 projector?

    Thanks
     
  2. StephenL

    StephenL Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2000
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If your highest resolution sources are 16:9 (such as HDTV and widescreen enhanced DVDs) it's better to have a display that can use all its resolution for 16:9 sources. If your 4:3 sources are generally of lower resolution and quality, it's better to display to them on a 16:9 display rather than shrink your highest resolution sources to fit a 4:3 display.
     
  3. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 1998
    Messages:
    8,332
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
  4. Michael St. Clair

    Joined:
    May 3, 1999
    Messages:
    6,001
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I disagree with one 4:3 statement in the faq:

     
  5. Doug_B

    Doug_B Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2001
    Messages:
    1,081
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If one chooses a 4:3 proj (and screen) that has the same horizontal resolution as a 16:9 proj (or same width screen) because one's space is width-limited, that could make sense if one watches a reasonable amount of 4:3 material. However, certain projectors may not be forgiving when showing the non-native aspect ratios from the perspective of how much the non-used portion of the projector's image/panel is illuminated.

    In the example of a 4:3 projector, any wider aspect ratio image would show letterboxing, but the letterbox portion may not be as black as one would hope. I don't know how prevalent this is with projectors, but my inexperienced guess (please chime in) is that it would generally apply to digital projs such as LCD and DLP (and why not LCOS too). Using masking may be the best solution for this. Screen material probably has an effect as well. If given a mix of generally lower rez 4:3 material vs higher rez 16:9, 1:85, and 2:35 (etc) material, I'd rather see my high rez material less influenced by this light "spillage", thus the 16:9 preference (which is based on demoing only, as I'm still waiting for my screen [​IMG] ). I guess I will find out soon how much of an effect this has on my setup.

    Doug
     
  6. Michael St. Clair

    Joined:
    May 3, 1999
    Messages:
    6,001
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Doug,

    Agreed, fixed pixel displays which make up tons of FPTVs (and a small amount of RPTVs) have their own issues. I'd likely go with 16:9 for any fixed pixel display, and would suggest such even for folks who may rightfully go 4:3 for CRT-based displays...

    In the fixed-pixel display market, 4:3 seems to be fast disappearing regardless. On the other hand, more 4:3 HD-cable CRT-based devices are on the market now than ever.
     

Share This Page