16:9 mode

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Fitzsimmons, Jan 1, 2002.

  1. Mark Fitzsimmons

    Mark Fitzsimmons Supporting Actor

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    I have seen some TVs listed as having a "16:9 mode". What exactly is this? I understand what the 16:9 aspect ratio is, but what is the advantage of a tv that has this mode vs one that doesn't?
     
  2. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    On a regular 4:3 TV with the DVD player set to 4:3 also, when playing an anamorphic DVD, the DVD player puts in black bars.

    If you put the DVD player in 16:9 mode, the picture appears stretched vertically (or squeezed horizontally).

    But, with a 4:3 TV with 16:9 mode (also called various names, such as vertical squeeze or vertical compression), the TV puts all 480 scan lines in a strip the exact height of the 16:9 image, devoting no scan lines at all to the black bars. That effectively shrinks the picture vertically, restoring it to its proper aspect ratio.

    The picture then still has black bars, but the resolution of the widescreen image is much better, becuase it uses 480 scan lines instead of only, say, 320.

    16:9 mode is HIGHLY desirable on 4:3 TVs. It is available even with analog sets, such as the Sony WEGA 36FS13 (I think that's the number).

    16:9 mode is of no use for non-anamorphic DVDs or any other source, since the TV has no way of knowing that the black bars are even there.
     

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