16:9 Enhanced on Sony 27FS17

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Leverett, Jan 25, 2002.

  1. Leverett

    Leverett Extra

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    I am trying to use the 16:9 Enhanced mode on my Sony 27FS17. Every time I use it, the screen gets compressed pretty badly thus squishing the image on the screen making it look really bad. I read elsewhere that this could be caused by a setting on my DVD player where the DVD player tries to manipulate the DVD stream to 16:9. Could this be the cause of the extra squishing on anamorphic DVDs?

    I am using a Pioneer 525 DVD player.

    I apologize if the post was confusing. I would be more than happy to elaborate if anyone has any input.

    Thanks for any assistance.

    Leverett
     
  2. Francois Plouffe

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    First thing is that 16x9 enhanced mode work only with anamorphic DVD. Before, you enable the 16x9 mode on your Sony, how the picture looks? If the picture doesn't appears too tall, it mean that the DVD you are watching is not anamorphic, or you DVD player is not setted for widescreen (16x9) TV.
     
  3. Leverett

    Leverett Extra

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    I tried 2 different Anamorphic DVDs - Terminator SE and Aliens SE - both had the problem of being squished when the 16:9 enhanced mode was set on the Sony TV. The Sony TV is 4:3. Do I have to set the DVD player prefs to 16:9 in order to use the 16:9 enhanced mode on the TV (I think I have it set to 4:3 on the DVD player to match my TV)? If I switch the DVD player settings to 16:9, will the DVD player distort non-anamorphic DVDs?

    Any help is appreciated.

    Leverett
     
  4. Evan Hartnett

    Evan Hartnett Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah, you have to set the DVD player to 16:9. If a dvd isn't anamorphic it'll look normal and then you know you don't have to do the squeeze. If it looks stretched then you should squeeze it (at least I do on my TV, it doesn't automatically do the compression).
     
  5. Francois Plouffe

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    That it exactly it, you must set your DVD to 16x9. In doing so, the image will be stretched vertically, then the 16x9 mode of your Sony will "magnetically" squeezed the image back to a 16x9 ration. In the process, the image will retain ALL the information on the anamorphic DVD instead of having the DVD player dropping 1 of every 4 line to restore the proper 16x9 ration.

    Your image will be far superior; you will see less jagged diagonal line, slow vertical camera pan will much more stable. Just look at a space movie; with no 16x9 mode, the stars are always dancing in the starfield when the camera move, but with the 16x9 mode, the same stars will be rock solid.
     
  6. Leverett

    Leverett Extra

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    Sweet... Thanks for the rsponses guys - I really appreciate the info.
    Evan: I also have to manually set the enhanced 16:9 feature on my TV. It will definitely be worth it! to go through the "hassle" if it works!
    I am so looking forward to wathcing DVDs tonite... Wish I wasnt stuck at work. Actually I think I'm starting to feel sick... [​IMG]
    Thanks again
    Leverett
     
  7. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    As you've gathered by now, the DVD must be outputting at 16:9 so that the Sony can give you an anamorphically enhanced picture. And to see the difference it makes, it would be nice if you had a non-anamorphic edition of a film that you also have that's 16:9-enhanced.

    It's this feature alone that makes the NTSC-only WEGAs worth the money. (But, man, do they ever need greyscale calibration; they run at much too high a color temp.)
     

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