16:9 but not enhanced?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Jesse Murphy, Oct 7, 2004.

  1. Jesse Murphy

    Jesse Murphy Auditioning

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    My parents purchased a 24AF44 Toshiba television for me, but due to logistics, I'll be unable to pick it up for another month. When going over the description on the Toshiba site (as well as Amazon.com, and other places) I've discovered that the 16:9 mode on the 24AF44 may not be the same as 16:9 enhanced.

    Can anyone explain to me just what a regular 16:9 mode is? When I decided to get the tv, I assumed that it was a 16:9 vertical squeeze mode, which it may not be. So what benefits does it have, other than reducing phosphor wear?

    I've been searching forums and the internet for a week now, and all I've come across is a comment that if it has grey, not black, bars, then the 16:9 mode may not give a resolution advantage.

    Thanks all,
    Jesse Murphy
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    From Tosh's own tech specs, it does indeed seem to NOT give a full res widescreen mode, just provides grey bars instead of black to help with burn in problems.
     
  3. Jesse Murphy

    Jesse Murphy Auditioning

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    I appreciate the reply, John.

    So, in other words, the widescreen mode offers no benefits other than preventing burn-in?

    If I might ask a second question... What would be the difference in playing a wide screen DVD in regular 4:3 mode, and playing a widescreen DVD in 16:9 mode?

    As far as I can tell, the only difference is one has black bars and the other has grey bars... Is there something I am missing here?

    Thanks again,
    Jesse Murphy
     
  4. John S

    John S Producer

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    With this display, that does seem to be the only difference... It is a marketing thing, to make you think your getting a real native widescreen mode I would assume.


    UUHHGGG... Buyer beware....

    On my Philips, when in native widescreen mode. You have to set the player for a widescreen 16:9 display aspect ratio. I do not think that is the case at all with this display.
     
  5. Jesse Murphy

    Jesse Murphy Auditioning

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    Well, I suppose their marketing ploy worked. [​IMG]

    Oh well. Thanks for your help, John.


    Jesse Murphy
     
  6. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Here is the clarification you need:

    The Toshiba's 16:9 mode is a raster-collapsing process to produce a 16:9 window. You could call this "16:9 enhancement," but that wouldn't be accurate for this set or even a 16:9-native set. It's a mode that lets you display 16:9-encoded sources at proper resolution and scaling.

    This"16:9 enhancement" phrase would be more accurate in describing a DVD itself, one that has been 16:9-encoded.

    And when setting up your parents' DVD player, make sure its output mode is "16:9." Once adjusted to that, leave it alone for good.
     
  7. Jesse Murphy

    Jesse Murphy Auditioning

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    Thanks, Jack.

    Just for everyone's amusement... I called Toshiba asking about this TV. I asked the saleswoman what the difference between the 16:9 Vertical Compression Mode (on the 32" and 36" TVs) and the 16:9 Mode (on the 24" and 27") was. Her response:

    "Well, velocity scan modulation is just a feature on high end TVs. You can't really compare it between the different TVs. The 16:9 mode will let you play widescreen movies on your TV."

    So, I asked what good the 16:9 was, not bothering to ask why she was talking about velocity scan modulation.

    "It lets you watch a widescreen TV using your whole TV screen."

    So it stretches the image?

    "Yes"

    So, I have to say that the people at HTF are much more knowledgeable than Toshiba's salespeople.

    Thanks again everyone,


    Jesse Murphy
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Completely false. Not all widescreen films have the same aspect ratio. And since that Toshiba is a 4:3-native set, how can its 16:9 mode possibly "fill" the "entire screen"? Even with 16:9-native sets, films shot in 2.35:1 or wider will not "fill" the screen.

    Moral of this story, of your adventure in the consumer jungle? It is the buyer who must be armed with knowledge, for the salespeople at most outlets are sadly, tragically ill-informed. And most consumers pay for this ignorance.

    You are wise to be a member of HTF and to read these boards.
     

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