16:9 Aspect Ratio

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by MickStutler, Jun 11, 2003.

  1. MickStutler

    MickStutler Auditioning

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    I just purchased a Sony KV-34XBR800 TV and I also have a Sony DVP-NS715P as the source. I suspect that the DVD player is not displaying the entire image (cutting of the top and bottom). I observed this utilizing the Lord of the Rings DVD set. Is there any way to perform a test?

    Thanks...
     
  2. greg_t

    greg_t Screenwriter

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    Movies come in different aspect ratio's, the two most common being 1.85 and 2.35. The aspect ratio of your 16x9 set is 1.78. DVD's that are 1.85 will fill the screen. Movies that are 2.35, such as Lord of the Rings, will still have small black bars on the top and bottom of the screen. Having a widescreen TV does not mean you won't have black bars. You do want to make sure that your DVD player is set to 16x9 mode and not 4x3. Other than that, 2.35 movies such as Lord of the rings, Star Wars, Gladiator, ect, will all have small black bars. So this is normal behavior for films with the wider aspect ratio.
     
  3. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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  4. MickStutler

    MickStutler Auditioning

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    I am aware of the different aspect ratios of movies. I tried "The Princess Bride" which is 1:85 and still see substantial cropping of the video. What I am looking for is a test DVD or something that I can use for calibration, etc.

    Thanks
     
  5. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    It sounds like you may simply be experiencing overscan, which affects nearly all tube and RPTV sets. Both the AVIA and Video Essentials test discs have screens designed to measure the amount of overscan on a display, and these should suit your needs.

    M.
     
  6. MickStutler

    MickStutler Auditioning

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    Ok, Lets assume I have overscan. Can I do anything for it (like buy a new DVD player) or is there a tweak?
     
  7. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    Overscan has nothing to do with the DVD player. It's in the TV. Depending on the model, it can be minimized by service menu adjustments, but you have to know exactly what you're doing or you may end up much worse off than you started.

    Where are you seeing "cropping" of the video on, e.g., The Princess Bride? And how do you know that the cropping is "substantial"?

    M.
     
  8. MickStutler

    MickStutler Auditioning

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    That is the question. I assume the AVIA will answer this question.. I noticed the cropping on the Lord of the Rings DVD. It seems that I see alot of cropped heads when I watch it I don't know if that is a function of the DVD player, TV, or the DVD for that matter.
     
  9. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  10. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Make sure you are watching the DVD without a Zoom mode selected.
     
  11. MickStutler

    MickStutler Auditioning

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    The LOTR edition is the special extended edition. One scene in particular is the very beginning of disk two. I also tried it utilizing all view modes on the TV and get the same image just presented in the different modes. I can't find anything on the DVD jacket to indicate wide screen. It sounds like they just recorded it that way.

    Thanks...
     
  12. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Then problem solved. You're watching a cropped, pan-and-scan 4:3 transfer.
     
  13. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    I wasn't aware that the LOTR SE had a fullscreen edition.
     
  14. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  15. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Maybe what he's talking about is how Peter Jackson uses a very tight framing in many of the closeups and "talking head" shots. In many such shots, the framing does crop off the top of people's heads.

    Anyway, definitely use AVIA (not VE) to verify degree of overscan and make sure 2.35:1 movies like LotR:EE actually show some black bars. If there are no black bars, then something is definitely wrong.

    _Man_
     
  16. MickStutler

    MickStutler Auditioning

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    Thanks for being very patient with me. I will try to be specific as I know. The Sony DVD is setup to output on 16:9 aspect ratio. I am using progressive scan output as well. I am using component output to the TV. The LOTR DVD is the New Line Platinum Series special extended DVD edition. I have searched hi and low for a aspect ratio on the DVD and come up empty. The menu on the DVD has no setting for aspect ratio, just audio settings. With this setup I see black bars above and below when I view on full screen. The cropped heads appear the same no matter which format I view in. I will purchase the AVIA and test out my system to be sure.
     
  17. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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    The extended edition has an aspect ratio of 2.35:1.

    Overscan will only crop the picture at a point where the picture itself is touching the edge of the TV screen. Overscan won't affect the top and bottom of the image on the LOTR DVD. All it will do is decrease the size of the black bars a little bit. What you call cropping is how the director intended it.
     
  18. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    If/When you get Matrix Reloaded on DVD (end of October), please please don't complain about the heads being cropped, because that's also how it was shot for the theatrical version. [​IMG]
     
  19. MickStutler

    MickStutler Auditioning

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    I just checked out the MIB II DVD. It is recorded with the 1:85 aspect ratio and fills the screen with no heads being chopped or bars. I guess I can give my TV a clean bill of health and we can stick a fork in this thread. [​IMG]
     
  20. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Mike,

    For anamorphic dvds like LOTR, use "Full" mode on the tv. You've already set the dvd player properly to 16/9.

    For 2:35 movies you should see smallish black bars, for 1:85 movies none.

    If the heads are cropped at the top but you have black bars, that's the way the movie was framed and there's nothing wrong.

    Usually but not always, the aspect ratio of widescreen movies is on the back of the box. Also, anamorphic widescreen movies are usually but not always denoted as "anamorphic widescreen" or "enhanced for widescreen tvs".

    If you play a non-anamorphic widescreen disc with the tv in "full" mode, the picture will look horizontally stretched. When this happens, change the tv's "wide mode" to Zoom. If it's a 4/3 aspect ratio movie, use "Normal" which will put gray bars on the side of the 4/3 image.
     

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