13 Days commentary: b+w explanation?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by EricW, Oct 1, 2001.

  1. EricW

    EricW Cinematographer

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    i haven't had a chance to rent the 13 Days disc yet, but does the commentary track on the film explain why there was the shift to black and white in some scenes?
     
  2. donovan_chin

    donovan_chin Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't know if the commentary track explains it but I know that one of the Infinitifilm elements does. I would assume that the commentary discusses it as well.
     
  3. Brad_W

    Brad_W Screenwriter

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    I believe it is the Infinifilm element that explains this. If you are asking about the B&W, here it is:
    The use of black and white for 13 days was to show the time period (just another reminder that we are not in the present) and also to capture the same feeling that all of Time Magazine photos of the Kennedies were able to capture, i.e.: Bob and John huddled close together at the White House. The Infinifilm element dealy is pretty cool for this movie.
    P.S. Since this is a movie about the Cuban Missle Crisis, does anyone know if there is a good movie out about The Bay of Pigs?
    ------------------
    "I was born to murder the world." -Nix (Lord of Illusions)
    My Home Page http://www.geocities.com/masternix/DVD.html
     
  4. Colin Chisholm

    Colin Chisholm Auditioning

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    I believe that the B&W sequences were the portions of the Cuban Missle crisis that were seen by the public at the time. They anchor the rest of the film which covers portions of the actual historical events that are not widely know, especially at the time.
    B&W = The public, documented portions of the events that have been widely known since the 60's.
    Color = The previously unknown "behind the scenes" parts of the crisis.
    Did that make sense?
     

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