12ft X 10ft HT

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by ScottMalito, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. ScottMalito

    ScottMalito Auditioning

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    I am thinking of building a 12ft length X 10ft width HT. Is this to small of a room? I am planing on using the Infocus 4805 projector. I want a 92 inch screen. I have a few questions.

    1) Am I going to have problems with the sound? Would it be better to leave a portion of the room open?

    2) Is it going to be to warm in the room?


    Thank you,
    Scott
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Scott, the 4805 has the following physical dimensions... 4.2"H x 9.8"W x 12.9" depth. Since it is ported/vented at the front, you can mount it up against the back wall which would place the lens of the projector approx 10'11" from the screen. This would result in a maximum 16x9 screen size of 86".
     
  3. ScottMalito

    ScottMalito Auditioning

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    Good to know. I messed up on the cacluations. Should I fully enclose the room?
     
  4. Jim Mcc

    Jim Mcc Producer

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    Scott, I'm confused about your questions. Do you mean problems with the surround sound due to room size/shape?
    And question #2, I don't know what you mean?
    What will your seating distance be, about 10 feet? A 92" screen is a little big for a 10' seating distance(if 10' is correct).
    Neil, did you take into account leaving about 6" behind projector for the cables?
     
  5. ScottMalito

    ScottMalito Auditioning

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    I do mean surround sound due to room size and shape.

    For Question #2 I was wondering if the projector is going to put out to much heat and make the room very warm if it was full enclosed.
     
  6. Jim Mcc

    Jim Mcc Producer

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    Scott, I don't think you'll have a problem with the sound or too much heat.
     
  7. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Do you have some sort of ventilation for the room?
     
  8. ScottMalito

    ScottMalito Auditioning

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    Nope... Just whatever goes under the door.
     
  9. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    In some ways, I imagine that the 'micro' home theaters might be more satisfying. For one thing, it's probably easier to make it 'loud' - less volume of air to move. I'm not sure what having a tiny space does to very low frequencies (longer than the room) - I haven't read that part of the acostics books recently.

    Leo
     
  10. chris_everett

    chris_everett Second Unit

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    I have a fairly small room as well, and I would recommend that you have some sort of air-flow. Between 2 or three people, the projector and amps, it will get fairly warm without some air exchange.
     
  11. ScottMalito

    ScottMalito Auditioning

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    Chris,

    What kind of air-flow would you recommend?

    Scott
     
  12. Jim Mcc

    Jim Mcc Producer

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    I think you're worrying about something that may not even be a problem. But if it does get too warm in there, you can just use a small fan.
     
  13. chris_everett

    chris_everett Second Unit

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    If you have a central HVAC system, I would connect the room to that, if it's not already, if you don't have one you could

    1. Leave part of the room open, as mentioned in your first post. That alone would probably be enough

    2. Install a duct fan between that room and another

    3. Stick a box fan in the door, set to low

    What to do depends a lot on your local climate, the rest of your house, etc...

    As Jim said, you may not even have a problem, But I would at least leave your options open if you do.
     
  14. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Worry, because it will get hot and uncomfortable very fast. My first HT room was 10'x12'x8' (converted extra bedroom). Between my amps, RPTV (not even a PJ) and a few bodies it got very warm, very fast.

    A small fan will not work, it will just circulate warm air. Also, trying to blow in cool air will not work very well either. You need to install an exhaust fan to remove the warm air, this will inturn draw in cool air.

    Here's a few examples of what I did in my theaters...

    For my old bedroom theater I went into the attic and disconnected the heater vent just past the register and installed an 8" turbo fan. I wired it up to a switch in the room. The fan extracted the hot air into the attic and drew in cool air.

    For my current theater (in the garage with a front projector), I installed a vent opening in the front of the room down near the floor under the screen. In the back of the room up near the ceiling, I installed an exhaust fan. The exhaust fan draws out the hot air and pulls in the cool outside air. With the projector running, 8 people in the room and all the gear (including 6 amps) running the room stays nice and cool, it works great.

    You will need some sort of air exchange system in your room.
     
  15. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    I'm converting a bedroom with similar dimensions (and using the 4805!). I didn't give much thought to the ventilation issue, but I don't plan on having that as the viewing room for guests, so it will just be me. I'll be keeping a fan handy though.
     
  16. ScottMalito

    ScottMalito Auditioning

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    I live in Colorado and we hot summers and cold winters. I will need to figure how to get some sort of air exhange. Or if I leave a 5ft opeing towards the back on one wall will that be enough?
    Will this cause a problem with sorround sound?
     
  17. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Openings will work, sort of, but you need something that will move the air through the room. Fans are noisy. At one time I tried one of those box floor fans set to low and it was very noisy, not something I'd recommend.

    Can't really comment on your surround sound issue. It depends on your set-up and layout of the room, but, you shouldn't have too much of an issue.
     
  18. chris_everett

    chris_everett Second Unit

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    Can you post a picture/link of your room plans with this 5' opening? I'm not sure exatly what you have in mind, although any surround sound issues should be solvable.

    RE: Box fans. Most box fans, on low, in my experience, are pretty quiet, However, they are big and ugly, and I would generally consider them a temporary measure.

    More information would be _very_ helpful in giving you some relevant advice.

    Is attic space available?
    Do you have an existing forced air system?
    Is crawlspace availalbe?
    How many exterior walls?
    Any windows?
    Where does this 5' opening lead?
    Does the door lead somewhere else?

    Any other information would also be helpful.
     

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