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12-inch composite (L-R-V) RCA cables

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by Jason__, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. Jason__

    Jason__ Auditioning

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    I've done several searches and found one related thread. Tried to link to the thread but then the forum software said I can't put in a link on my first 15 posts, and it wiped out the whole thing I'd written [​IMG] So lucky for you all, now I'll be more brief!! [​IMG]

    I have closely stacked components due to tight space constraints. They're all connected with 3-strand RCA audio/video cables, in either 3 foot or 6 foot lengths. As a result, there's dozens of feet of extra cord bundled up behind, making it much harder to fit everything in.

    I can't imagine I'm the only one with closely stacked components, and yet I've searched high and low (including all the ad links I've found on this site) and can't locate 1-foot long RCA cables.

    What I have found is:

    - 1.5 foot super-high-quality cables, for $15-$30 each
    - options for making my own cables
    - options for bundling/stacking/running the cables more neatly

    At this point, I've got them neatly contained with releasable zip ties, the television that is receiving the signal is not worthy of spending the money on high quality cables, and once I upgrade the television I'll go to S-Video or component anyhow, so I'd prefer not to buy more than the basic cables. Making my own cables is an option, but I'd far prefer to have pre-made ones.

    So, with those caveats, can anyone either point me to 3-strand RCA cables in lengths of 1 or 1.5 feet or at least explain to me why these aren't incredibly common items? We all want the cleanest setup we can have, and I can't be the only person with composite linked devices stacked atop one another . . .

    Thanks!

    --Jason
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    They aren't common because most people need longer lengths to run from shelf to shelf. Stacking components should be avoided, particularly stacking anything on top of the receiver, but I unsed to have an enclosed cabinet and I had the same problem even with separate shelves for everything.

    This should fit your needs:

    http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...number=181-660
     
  3. Jason__

    Jason__ Auditioning

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    Thanks, I did find one guy who could special order me some simple molded cables in 1.5 feet lengths for $4 each. I know it's heresy to say around here, but cheap cables are fine for this setup because the weak link is the TV and the acoustics. Cheap cables end up working better because they take up less room.

    In my original post I'd gone into a bit more detail about why these aren't arranged better (i.e. separately) on shelves with plenty of space for wire runs. This is a tight space, built into a wall, and the only place to stack components where my toddler can't get to them. The receiver is on top to maximize cooling for it, and I monitor it all to make sure nothing's getting too hot, but for the time being it's the best I can do. [​IMG]

    Thanks for the link, though. That's as close as I've seen on any website, and the only better option I've found came from a customer request which turned into a special order.

    Any other sources out there?
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    It is undesirable to move a loaded equipment cabinet (unless wheeled and on a hard floor) to get around back. This strains the joints, especially in wood furniture, no matter how you try.

    So the next best thing is to be able to withdraw components completely one at a time from the front if you need to adjust things in back. And that means having all cables reasonably long.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  5. Jason__

    Jason__ Auditioning

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    Allan-

    I'm assuming you're answering my second question about why these are not more readily available, as opposed to making a suggestion about my setup. If not, rest assured I'm not straining any furniture joints. [​IMG] My living room has a built-in alcove which fits out AV equipment (TV, DVD Changer, DVD Recorder, Cable Box, Media Streamer, Receiver, front speaker). There are three shelves, but one of them holds four of those components. They are stacked (no other option in the space) and they rotate together when I need to get under them (smooth surface shelf combined with a small piece of wax paper under each foot of the bottom device).

    Since they are one on top of another, it would be impossible to withdraw one without withdrawing all the others, unless you wanted to disconnect everything each time you withdrew them. Generally, when I need to get to teh back it's simply to add or remove some connection, so rotating them around, doing what I need to do and rotating them back into position works perfectly.

    It would work even better without so much cord bundled up back there, thus my initial query . . .

    --Jason
     
  6. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    I know that I could use some short cables. I currently have a shelf which accomodates my equipment on a side-by-side and stacked basis [AC-3 decoder on top of the reciever, LDP next to the stack], and am looking to move some of the stuff into a specialty EIA rack; in any case the 3-foot cables I am using are just too long for convenience. I also have some professional-type equipment which uses BNCs, but fortunately I was able to get some short jumper-type cables for it.
     

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