10Base-T and 100Base-Tx in english?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Eric_L, Aug 7, 2003.

  1. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    My router used to show I was connected to the host computer by 100Base-Tx. After I upgraded the Mobo and used the onboard LAN it shows I have 10-Base-T.

    If I knew what that meant I'd be either pissed or impressed. I've noticed no change in performance....

    Any ideas?
     
  2. MikeAlletto

    MikeAlletto Cinematographer

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    Basically 10 megabit per second as opposed to 100. You want 100 if your hardware supports it.
     
  3. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    Basically the 10x is 10 megabytes per second vs 100 megabytes on the other connection. Obviously 100 is 10 times as fast as 10 meg connection all things being equal.
     
  4. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    It is a wireless router, I suspect that the DLS connection and wireless technology are nowhere near 100base-Tx speeds yet. I just checked and I had it reversed. My router is presently connected via 100Base-Tx.

    Thanks for your info.
     
  5. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    Right your DSL connection is likely in the 1 to 3 megabytes area so you won't notice any difference for downloading where you'd notice is large file transferes across your LAN (between local PC's)
     
  6. MikeAlletto

    MikeAlletto Cinematographer

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  7. Curt Irwin

    Curt Irwin Auditioning

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    1. Network communications are measured in megabits (Mb). Internal storage megaBytes (MB), a Byte = 8 bits. Notice the caps.

    2. 10BaseT = 10Mb, 100BaseTX = 100Mb, ten times faster. Inall reality it peaks at about 75% of that depending on the use of hubs or switches. Switches provide for a dedicated connection between machines and are much faster.

    3. Wireless has three standards, A, B, and G. A runs at about 11 Mb, B runs at 11/22 Mb but has better range and security, G has a 54 Mb speed and even better security. They all work like 2.4 GHz phone systems, and it is recommended to get either B or G - probably G.

    4. DSL ranges from 256 Kb (Kilo (thousand) bits) to 3 Mb (Mega (million) bits). Depends on what you pay, but yes it is far behind.
     
  8. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  9. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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  10. MikeAlletto

    MikeAlletto Cinematographer

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    But A is in 5Ghz band where G is in 2.4Ghz like B (reason I mention it is 2.4 interfers with microwave ovens and 2.4Ghz phones, as well as some other things).
     
  11. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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