100% O2 free?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Joe DC, Jan 27, 2004.

  1. Joe DC

    Joe DC Agent

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    If a cable company does not advertise on the packaging that a cable is 100% O2 free, should I assume it is? Should I buy O2 free cables as opposed to non-100% O2 free audio cabling? I'm asking b/c I was at my local Home Depot and they sell RCA audio/video cables. I'm interested in purchasing the RCA brand audio L/R cables to hook up my Denon 1600 DVD-A player to my receiver because they are alot cheaper than Monster. Any experience with the RCA cabling (don't know model #) and would I hear a difference if I buy the overpriced Monster cables? Pls. don't suggest any other cabling such as Blue Jeans or the like. I'm just interested in the two mentioned. Thx.
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Joe. I think you are mixing things up a bit.

    Usually OFC is mentioned with respect to speaker wire, not interconnects. I dont know of any of my interconnects that mention OFC so I dont believe it should be an issue for you.


    I'm afraid it's a bit like asking "Any experience with Chevy automobiles?". You could be talking about a Vega or a Corvette.

    In general, audio is fairly low frequency and not as much of a challenge for a cable as video. I suspect the L/R RCA brand cables would be fine, but cannot promise it.

    Since you are doing DVDA and need ... 6 cables, I would strongly suggest you buy 3 sets of the L/R cables of the identical make & model to get them all made with similar coax and plugs. You might also consider 2 sets of the budget RCA component video cables. Video cables make dandy audio cables and this would give you only 2 thick cables behind your rack. (Cable clutter can be an issue).

    Good Luck.
     
  3. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    To Bob's fine response, I'll add that most wire today that's sold for audio purposes is OFC and I base this on discussions I've had with Madison Wire, a large domestic producer. There's no audible advantage to OFC nor does it oxidize any slower. It's fairly easy to make and was done so for very different purposes which have to do with a phenomenon called hydrogen embrittlement.
     

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