CJ 4DPLEX unveils ‘Future of Cinema’ concept

CJ 4DPLEX presented its latest ‘4DX Screen’ professional cinema concept at CES this week, which we anticipated in a news story last week. The new 4DX Screen blends two of the company’s existing cinema technologies, namely 4DX and ScreenX. This new “innovative” theatre format with integrated screening system and AR platform includes a “cutting-edge” computer vision technology.

The new product encompasses what the Korean company describes as “convergence” technology which it believes will constitute the very “future of cinema” and is protected by over 220 claimed patents. For starters, audiences will experience a four-sided screen tech which projects images onto side walls and ceiling. The auditorium itself will have a trapezoid shape which promises to deliver a panoramic experience with added viewing angles to the left and right. Additionally, new 4DX motion chairs will feature a wider and smoother riding experience. CJ 4DPLEX says that on the first day of CES over 1200 people experienced the new concept on the company’s booth in sell-out screenings.

JongRyul Kim, CEO of CJ 4DPLEX, said, “As leading innovators of cinema technology, we believed it was befitting to showcase the most advanced type of cinema at the world’s largest consumer electronics show called CES. We will continue to strive to provide the most engaging form of entertainment in the field of cinema. As moviegoers, we intend to stand in the forefront of cinema technology and attract young consumers back to the cinemas.”

Immersive audio at the demos has been provided by DTS (DTS:X). CJ 4DPLEX also showcased an indoor AR platform that applies advanced computer vision technology to recreate elements of mobile games that will blend with the real world. The technology is expected to launch in 2020 promoting business opportunities for the gaming and entertainment industry. If you’re at CES on its final day today, head over to LVCC, Tech East, South Hall 1, Booth #20918.

Published by

Martin Dew

editor

6 Comments

  1. The big issue with 4DX and ScreenX, from a concept point of view, is that none of the additional experience provided with the increased ticket price is created by or overseen by the filmmakers who made the movie being shown. All of the 4DX effects, and all of the ScreenX extensions, are designed by third parties that graft that material on to an already finished film.

    I think that limits the ability to sell the formats because they don’t really integrate with the film. They happen on top of the film. It can be a fun ride but it doesn’t necessarily feel like it’s a vital part of the experience.

    Compare that to IMAX, where filmmakers are using special cameras to capture additional detail to be shown on those larger screens. The actual filmmakers are incorporating IMAX into their process and it comes across as being part of the movie.

    If you go see Avengers Endgame in IMAX, you’re seeing extra visual information that the filmmakers designed and shot themselves. If you see Endgame in 4DX, someone else has decided when to rock your chair for you to make it feel more “real”. If you see Endgame in ScreenX, you see slides to the left and right of the main screen with backgrounds that look similar to what’s in the movie but added by someone else who thought they looked good.

    I think there is a very limited market for add ons that double the ticket price but don’t add content to the experience and aren’t sanctioned by the filmmakers.

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