Cinerama’s Golden Head and Tale of Old Whiff

ften considered the LOST Cinerama film, "The Golden Head" starring Buddy Hackett and George Sauders will come out sometime this fall through Flicker Alley. 3 Stars

A heads up on a “Golden Head” release

Often considered the LOST Cinerama film, “The Golden Head” starring Buddy Hackett and George Sauders will come out sometime this fall through Flicker Alley. One of the bonus extras will be the LOST 15 minute 1960 cartoon “A Tale of Of Whiff” that was originally in Smell-o-Vision and played with Mike Todd Jr’s “Scent of Mystery”.

Here are two 5 minute remastering shorts that will also be included on this release along with slideshows and trailers.

These may take a few minutes to load up:
www.davidstrohmaier.com/review/Gold%20Head%20Reconstruction-iPad%20and%20iPhone%204.m4v

www.davidstrohmaier.com/review/Old%20Whiff%20remastering-iPad%20and%20iPhone%204.m4v

Gold Head BTS.png

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49 Comments

  1. Strohmaier

    A heads up on a "Golden Head" release

    Often considered the LOST Cinerama film, "The Golden Head" starring Buddy Hackett and George Sauders will come out sometime this fall through Flicker Alley. One of the bonus extras will be the LOST 15 minute 1960 cartoon "A Tale of Of Whiff" that was originally in Smell-o-Vision and played with Mike Todd Jr's "Scent of Mystery".

    Here are two 5 minute remastering shorts that will also be included on this release along with slideshows and trailers.

    These may take a few minutes to load up:
    http://www.davidstrohmaier.com/review/Gold%20Head%20Reconstruction-iPad%20and%20iPhone%204.m4v

    http://www.davidstrohmaier.com/review/Old%20Whiff%20remastering-iPad%20and%20iPhone%204.m4v

    View attachment 44109

    That's just fantastic! Huge kudos and thanks Mr Strohmaier!

  2. Another Heads up- For those near LA on April 28th -the new restoration of Windjammer will screen at the Cinerama Dome in Hollywood on the full curved screen as part of the Turner Classic Movies Film Festival.

    If you happen to be in Amsterdam it will screen at the Eye Filmmuseum on Sunday March 4th. Then If your in Paris the Cinematheque Francaise will show it March 10th. And those in Oslo, Norway on May 27 can see it at the Coliseum theater where it had its premeire in 1958. Then enjoy a 4 hour cruse on the film's ship, Christian Radich right after the show.

  3. ArnoldLayne

    That's just fantastic! Huge kudos and thanks Mr Strohmaier!

    GOLDEN HEAD was never a LOST Cinerama film. Maybe a lost film but definitely not a Cinerama film. Maybe it was not even a lost film but merely an unseen film after it bombed at the box-office and only was screened in 2 countries and then only very briefly. It is merely a curiosity film to see to-day.It was originally titled MILLIE GOES TO BUDAPEST

  4. Yes – but many have called it the Lost Cinerama film, that was what I was referring to. It only played on a Cinerama curved screen in London for 8 weeks and then was pulled. For a "Cinerama show" it was not a popular film.

  5. cinemiracle

    GOLDEN HEAD was never a LOST Cinerama film. Maybe a lost film but definitely not a Cinerama film.

    Not 3-panel Cinerama but a title presented in 70mm Cinerama like Circus World and Custer of the West.

  6. Thank you, David, for this wonderful news and for your incredible work! The more I see stories such as these about Cinerama releases, the more it makes me pine for a home video release of The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm.

  7. Strohmaier

    Yes – but many have called it the Lost Cinerama film, that was what I was referring to. It only played on a Cinerama curved screen in London for 8 weeks and then was pulled. For a "Cinerama show" it was not a popular film.

    Yes, The Golden Head played at the Royalty Cinerama theatre from April 8th to July 29th 1965. It came off to make way for The Greatest Story Ever Told, transferring from the Casino Cinerama. The Royalty was one of three theatres operated by Cinerama in London at that time, the Casino (1954-1974), the Coliseum (1963-1968) and the Royalty (1963-1966). The Golden Head, of course, was filmed in Technirama.

  8. I applaud your commitment and dedication and have been impressed with previous Cinerama restorations, however looking at these examples, I wonder if you might've gone a step too far. I hate to criticise this effort, but feel that redrawing animation inklines and backgrounds is going beyond restoration. The focus issue doesn't seem sufficiently detrimental to the film to justify that. I can understand cleaning dirt and colour fade, but feel analog artefacts of animation photography should be left intact. If the image quality was originally less than perfect, then so be it.

    It's really something special to have located this long lost cartoon, I look forward to seeing the rest.

  9. We thought about that -only 6 shots were "fixed" that way and animation historians we talked to all thought it was the right thing to do given the circumstances. Also too many people complained to us when they saw the original before these fixes on the big screen. Trust me, you would have done the same given these problems. Now the cartoon's story is much less distracting with the "fixes". Also the original scans, before the repairs, are preserved as well.

  10. Les Mangram

    Yes, The Golden Head played at the Royalty Cinerama theatre from April 8th to July 29th 1965. It came off to make way for The Greatest Story Ever Told, transferring from the Casino Cinerama. The Royalty was one of three theatres operated by Cinerama in London at that time, the Casino (1954-1974), the Coliseum (1963-1968) and the Royalty (1963-1966). The Golden Head, of course, was filmed in Technirama.

    The Astoria in Charing Cross Road was the 4th Cinerama theatre in London which had really good sound.

  11. DP 70

    The Astoria in Charing Cross Road was the 4th Cinerama theatre in London which had really good sound.

    Rank's Astoria was not really a "Cinerama" theatre. Its 1968 refurbishment resulted in a new curved screen similar to the Odeon Marble Arch and the Gaumont 1s at Sheffield and Bournemouth ( a similar screen was installed at around the same time at the Odeon Merrion Centre in Leeds). The Astoria reopened with its new screen on December 17th 1968 with Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. This played until July 30th 1969 and the following day Krakatoa, East of Java opened on exactly the same screen but was indeed advertised as being in "Cinerama". After a 24 week run Krakatoa made way for Paint Your Wagon which played for 79 weeks. A curious feature of the Astoria's new screen was that the top corners were cut off by the curvature of the balcony front (the projection box was beneath the balcony). The screen was actually masked to allow for this.

  12. Before the Astoria closed as a cinema in 1976 they ran a season of 70mm films which I saw including Scrooge, My Fair Lady, The Wild Bunch, Funny Lady and Papillon and they all looked really great on the screen.

  13. Les Mangram

    Rank's Astoria was not really a "Cinerama" theatre. Its 1968 refurbishment resulted in a new curved screen similar to the Odeon Marble Arch and the Gaumont 1s at Sheffield and Bournemouth ( a similar screen was installed at around the same time at the Odeon Merrion Centre in Leeds). The Astoria reopened with its new screen on December 17th 1968 with Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. This played until July 30th 1969 and the following day Krakatoa, East of Java opened on exactly the same screen but was indeed advertised as being in "Cinerama". After a 24 week run Krakatoa made way for Paint Your Wagon which played for 79 weeks. A curious feature of the Astoria's new screen was that the top corners were cut off by the curvature of the balcony front (the projection box was beneath the balcony). The screen was actually masked to allow for this.

    The Sheffield Gaumont 1 made a big thing about it being a Cinerama cinema when it was twinned in 1969. It didn't last long though because Cinerama and road show films were already running down. I visited the cinema frequently when I was working in Sheffield in the mid 1960s but the Gaumont deep curved screen was nowhere near as enveloping as the Cinerama screen at the Casino in London. More impressive was Manchester's Theatre Royal Cinerama screen.

  14. Strohmaier

    We thought about that -only 6 shots were "fixed" that way and animation historians we talked to all thought it was the right thing to do given the circumstances. Also too many people complained to us when they saw the original before these fixes on the big screen. Trust me, you would have done the same given these problems. Now the cartoon's story is much less distracting with the "fixes". Also the original scans, before the repairs, are preserved as well.

    I'm not seeing the clips in context, so perhaps you are correct, I'll reserve judgement on it at this point.

    Were any of the experts you consulted able to offer any advice with regard to the original colour palette? I sometimes get the impression vintage restorations may have been over-corrected for colour fade. Although I admit that my perception of what looks correct for that period is possibly biased from seeing faded examples, and perhaps some personal preference for muted palettes.

    I also notice that when faded colours are boosted to more saturated levels, it sometimes becomes apparent that colour depth has been lost that cannot be recovered. There is some inconsistency that is causing inklines and areas of the same cell colour area to split into other colours towards the edge of the frame. This is especially apparent in the scene with the dog catcher's van in front of the hotel. The clouds of smoke vary from greenish to purple, and the inklines turn red as the van exits frame. The dog itself is noticeably distorted.

    (apologies for lateness of reply)

  15. cinemiracle

    GOLDEN HEAD was NOT a Cinerama film. It was only ever shown in 2 cinemas in the world during it's original release.

    Since the thread was stared and titled by Dave Strohmaier, who is in all aspects a guru on Cinerama, I will continue to refer to this as a ‘lost’ Cinerama film. I also believe Mr Strohmaier answered you same remark in post 9 of this thread.

  16. We who have worked with Cinerama Inc. since 1998 consider Golden Head a 70mm Cinerama film, just as the others that opened in Cinerama theaters on curved screens with Cinerama noted in the opening titles such as Ice Station, 2001, etc. 70mm is a part of the later Cinerama history story.

  17. Ice-Station Zebra is one of my favorite films and would love to see a Smilebox version of it to recreate the experience I had seeing it at the Summit in Detroit. My memory may be faulty but I seem to recall that when I returned to re-watch it later the Overture had been shortened to about half its length, omitting the introductory material (which included a passage incongruously in bolero rhythm) and starting right in on the main theme.

  18. ahollis

    Since the thread was stared and titled by Dave Strohmaier, who is in all aspects a guru on Cinerama, I will continue to refer to this as a ‘lost’ Cinerama film. I also believe Mr Strohmaier answered your same remark in post 9 of this thread.

    Numerous 70mm films were projected onto Cinerama screens but that didn't make them Cinerama films. It was common where I worked.

  19. cinemiracle

    Numerous 70mm films were projected onto Cinerama screens but that didn't make them Cinerama films. It was common where I worked.

    i don't know if you are being deliberately obtuse but no one is saying that every 70mm film shown on Cinerama screens is considered part of Cinerama history. There is a world of difference between those 70mm films intended to be shown in Cinerama and advertised as such (GOLDEN HEAD being one) and those 70mm films (mainly reissues) which were never designed and/or promoted to be shown in Cinerama.

  20. cinemiracle

    Numerous 70mm films were projected onto Cinerama screens but that didn't make them Cinerama films. It was common where I worked.

    I refer you back to post #27 from David Strohmaier. I believe not only his knowledge, but his actual work on several Cinerama film restorations is the last word on this subject.

  21. Douglas R

    i don't know if you are being deliberately obtuse but no one is saying that every 70mm film shown on Cinerama screens is considered part of Cinerama history. There is a world of difference between those 70mm films intended to be shown in Cinerama and advertised as such (GOLDEN HEAD being one) and those 70mm films (mainly reissues) which were never designed and/or promoted to be shown in Cinerama.

    I was referring to the many NEW 70mm films shown on cinerama screens ,especially in Europe and Australia but never advertised as being projected in or advertised as being in cinerama. GOLDEN HEAD was such a film in Europe and I refuse to consider it a cinerama film regardless of who says so.

  22. Due to severe geometry issues I find projecting "normal" 70mm movies on a deeply curved screen problematic, I would probably not go above an 80° curvature for that reason or these days and with digital images just use a sophisticated image processor to fit the picture to the screen.

  23. cinemiracle

    I refuse to consider it a cinerama film regardless of who says so.

    There is nothing so valuable on a discussion forum as a logical, well-reasoned opinion. I hope Dave S. and RAH don't muddy the waters with techno-babble based on their decades of experience in the industry. It's only going to confuse people who live in the world of alternative facts.

  24. ahollis

    I would suggest taking a look at the below web site, for it has newspaper ads for The Golden Head playing at the Royalty Cinerama Theatre in the UK and presented by Cinerama. I know it will not change anyone’s mind, but it makes me feel confident in my position on the film.

    And I very nearly went to see it! I used to see every Cinerama film in those days but for some reason didn't get to see THE GOLDEN HEAD, which of course I deeply regret now (the Royalty was a lovely cinema as well) but I think the film ended its run sooner than I expected.

  25. It did go very quickly I recall.
    Never did see 70mm Cinerama there but remember the Royalty from Brothers Grimm and Best of Cinerama, and before that for Ben Hur(after it moved from the Empire and my second viewing ) and Mutiny on the Bounty.

  26. I am going to see Mutiny on the Bounty at Bradford in a few weeks, they are showing an original 70mm print which of
    course has bad colour fade but i hear the sound is good and it might be shown on the Cinerama screen and they have
    an original Ultra Panavision 70 lens to use as well.

  27. See you guys in Bradford, we are also showing Grand Prix (in digital Cinerama) just like we did at the TCM festival at the Cinerama Dome last April.

    My wife, Carin Anne, who worked long and hard on the editing crew of "Contact", which had shot 65mm on many efx. shots, will make her second appearance in Bradford introducing the film via 35mm scope.

    Another rare short I will present is the original 1956 Ultra Panavision test reel (MGM Camera 65 at he time) which I digitally restored for Panavision.

  28. DP 70

    I am going to see Mutiny on the Bounty at Bradford in a few weeks, they are showing an original 70mm print which of
    course has bad colour fade but i hear the sound is good and it might be shown on the Cinerama screen and they have
    an original Ultra Panavision 70 lens to use as well.

    I was lucky enough to see Mutiny at the Casino at a Saturday Midnight screening.
    I expect it was to original UP print.
    I guess they were thinking about a rerelease which never happened.
    It was its only screening and I can still recall how magnificent it looked and sounded.

  29. john a hunter

    I was lucky enough to see Mutiny at the Casino at a Saturday Midnight screening.
    I expect it was to original UP print.
    I guess they were thinking about a rerelease which never happened.
    It was its only screening and I can still recall how magnificent it looked and sounded.

    Are you sure that you saw MUTINY ON TH BOUNTY at the Casino in London? In which year? MOTB was shown in 70mm at the Royalty from 19 November 1962. The Casino was still showing 3 strip Cinerama in 1962 unless you saw it years later. Your post needs clarifying please regarding it's release date.

  30. I can imagine that the scenes shot in broad daylight on Tahiti must have looked fantastic in full color – and detail – but sadly these days one can either enjoy the detail with a 70mm print or possibly the colors with an IBtech 35mm print but not both.
    I have watched Mutiny twice in 70mm and one time it was the supposedly best remaining print with regard to colors but it had very little density and was in bad mechanical shape, still it was a much cherished occasion to watch it with a packed audience.

    Mutiny seems to be one of those movies that has quite a big number of fans, probably the third most popular UP70 movie after Ben-Hur and IAMMMMW. Its negative should be in decent shape so there is hope that Warner will revisit it and finally do it justice on Blu-ray and UHD as the current Blu-ray is a rather low resolution affair.

  31. cinemiracle

    Are you sure that you saw MUTINY ON TH BOUNTY at the Casino in London? In which year? MOTB was shown in 70mm at the Royalty from 19 November 1962. The Casino was still showing 3 strip Cinerama in 1962 unless you saw it years later. Your post needs clarifying please regarding it's release date.

    Wow!

  32. cinemiracle

    Are you sure that you saw MUTINY ON TH BOUNTY at the Casino in London? In which year? MOTB was shown in 70mm at the Royalty from 19 November 1962. The Casino was still showing 3 strip Cinerama in 1962 unless you saw it years later. Your post needs clarifying please regarding it's release date.

    In the post John does say a Midnight Screening and also a re-release so this must have been a show from a later date.

  33. Just to clarify, as I said, it was a single performance only on a Saturday at midnight. Would have been early 70's-late 60's.
    And it did look incredible.
    That first shot from Tahiti atop the hill where they sound the conch shell made my jaw drop!
    Although I had seen Mutiny at the Royalty, I recall this screening more.
    Pretty sure they were thinking of a reissue that never happened.

    And Peter, the only other special screening at the Casino that I know and which as a poor student , I could not afford, was a charity performance of Windjammer .
    The Duke of Edinburgh attended.
    Single screening mid week.

  34. john a hunter

    Just to clarify, as I said, it was a single performance only on a Saturday at midnight. Would have been early 70's-late 60's.
    And it did look incredible.
    That first shot from Tahiti atop the hill where they sound the conch shell made my jaw drop!

    haineshisway

    Mutiny on the Bounty in its original 70mm run at the Egyptian in Hollywood, looked absolute incredible, as did King of Kings which played there, too.

    I am thinking about collecting a few of these quotes and sending them to George Feltenstein. Dear George, once upon a time Mutiny on the Bounty looked fantastic but not anymore, we would be very grateful if you could make our jaw drop again.

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