Cinerama Dome’s 55th Birthday is November 7th

3 Stars

For those who might live or be in LA soon Arclight Cinemas and the Cinerama Dome will be celebrating the Dome’s 55th Birthday with some 7PM roadshow screenings. See dates & titles on websites below.

Two shows will have some special guests appear, “HTWWW” & “Mad World”. All will be digital, which we tested, and looks great on the 85 foot curved screen.

“Mad World” will play on the actual date that the Dome opened and premiered with it on November 7th.
Other 3 shows are on Wednesday nights.

If your gonna be in the area we would like your support so we can do more events like it in the future and keep roadshow presentations alive in LA!

http://www.in70mm.com/news/2018/cinerama_dome/index.htm

https://www.arclightcinemas.com/en/movies/arclight-presents

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108 Comments

  1. Yes at some point 3-panel will return to the Dome, we realized recently we had some maintenance to do on the old system.

    Also we needed 2 more Cinerama trained projectionists to do West or TIC again at a future date.

  2. Used to live three blocks from there and saw many films there, including the premiere of "Apocalypse Now," but it's really kind of hard to call it the Cinerama Dome anymore when it's not remotely the same theater except for the cosmetic dome shell only. It's just a same location at this point. Not complaining about the Arc-Light; saw a film there last summer, but I don't know how they can still say this is the Dome.

  3. Strohmaier

    Yes at some point 3-panel will return to the Dome, we realized recently we had some maintenance to do on the old system.

    Also we needed 2 more Cinerama trained projectionists to do West or TIC again at a future date.

    When that happens I will be in the audience. I was there in 2002 and still it is a vivid image.

  4. "Grand Prix" Super Panavision 70 aspect ratio test at the Dome, that's me in the center.
    Screen side masking is set for 81 feet wide (not the 89 feet-full width) so not quite as wide as fitting the Ultra Panvision 70 image or the Cinerama ratio, which we will do for "Mad, Mad World, Battle of the Bulge and HTWWW." Masking will be is set for Cinerama at the bottom so has to be changed from the the normal Dome scope setting just for for these films. We also do a special correction for the horizon sag and the Dome keystone effect on these shows, so the bottom of the screen will have straight horizons.

    View attachment 49556

  5. Strohmaier

    "Grand Prix" Super Panavision 70 aspect ratio test at the Dome, that's me in the center.
    Screen side masking is set for 81 feet wide (not the 89 feet-full width) so not quite as wide as fitting the Ultra Panvision 70 image or the Cinerama ratio, which we will do for "Mad, Mad World, Battle of the Bulge and HTWWW." Masking will be is set for Cinerama at the bottom so has to be changed from the the normal Dome scope setting just for for these films. We also do a special correction for the horizon sag and the Dome keystone effect on these shows, so the bottom of the screen will have straight horizons.

    View attachment 49556

    That is a great picture!

    I am surprised that Battle of The Bulge is shown, has some work been done on it recently?
    The Blu-ray does not really hold up very well so I hope the DCP will look better.. Grand Prix looks better than BotB but it still looks weaker than both IAMMMMW and HTWWW.

  6. Strohmaier

    All of them looked fine to me like Grand Prix did. Although I did not sit on the front row but 8 rows back.

    Again, I just don't understand front-row lovers. Eight rows back seems okay in that theater – for me, more like ten.

  7. In the summer between high school and college, I took my first-ever non-family vacation and visited LA.

    Saw "Back to the Future" at the Dome, and it was one of the most amazing cinematic experiences of my life!

    I took more trips to LA but never returned to the Dome – no idea why, other than I'm a dope! 😀

  8. Strohmaier

    For those who might live or be in LA soon Arclight Cinemas and the Cinerama Dome will be celebrating the Dome's 55th Birthday with some 7PM roadshow screenings. See dates & titles on websites below.

    By an astounding coincidence, I will be on vacation in California (I live in Alabama) when Mad World is showing, and had actually planned to be in the Hollywood area at that time. I will try to rearrange a couple of hotel stays and book tickets tonight. 😀

    I saw Close Encounters at the Dome last summer.

  9. Strohmaier

    All of them looked fine to me like Grand Prix did. Although I did not sit on the front row but 8 rows back.

    Thanks, maybe someone who knows the Blu-rays will attend, I would really like to know if the DCP of BotB looks different than the Blu-ray version as the Blu-ray has a peculiar combination of noise filtering and sharpening. The Blu-ray of Khartoum would have looked better but then BotB is probably the more popular title.

  10. I loved seeing movies at the Dome when I lived in L.A. In their first runs I saw E.T., Raiders, Back to the Future and many more. In retrospectives I saw Bridge on the River Kwai, Guns of Navarone, Jaws, 1941, Camelot, Oz, GWTW, Lawrence of Arabia and many more. Great memories. They once had a Spielberg day and I sat through 5 movies in one day. Awesome.

  11. There is a print of 70mm print of Grand Prix but it is mute, its a shame they could not have put a DTS Timecode on it at the time.
    I have had the HDDVD and have the BD of Grand Prix and will let you know what it looks like from the second row in Bradford.

  12. ahollis

    When that happens I will be in the audience. I was there in 2002 and still it is a vivid image.

    Allen we were in attendance for that screening as well. All part of a trip to LA to attend the first 3D Festival at the Egyptian Theatre. An unbelievable weekend in Hollywood!

  13. DFurr

    Allen we were in attendance for that screening as well. All part of a trip to LA to attend the first 3D Festival at the Egyptian Theatre. An unbelievable weekend in Hollywood!

    I saw HTWWW twice and Gorilla At Large in 3D. It was a special week.

  14. DP 70

    There is a print of 70mm print of Grand Prix but it is mute, its a shame they could not have put a DTS Timecode on it at the time.
    I have had the HDDVD and have the BD of Grand Prix and will let you know what it looks like from the second row in Bradford.
    I remember when i saw HTWWW in Digital at Bradford a few years ago someone said it looked better on the Cinerama screen
    that the 1971 70mm release.

    Apparently that 70mm print of Grand Prix has been screened at some point with a separate soundtrack running alongside the film but as this is a digital only screening it obviously was not something that was on the table.

    I can tell you that the 70mm print that I saw of HTWWW looked quite horrible and I went out of the screening after a few minutes as surely the Blu-ray looked a lot better. Sharpness was not up to usual 70mm standards and then there were of course all the obvious issues of bringing Cinerama to one strip of film so for me it will be one of the digital versions unless I can see a three strip presentation.

    Looking forward to what you say about Grand Prix, maybe it looks a bit better than the Blu-ray.

    There is a very telling scene I thought where the drivers are looking at a map with many small letters and it was very obvious that in the 70mm version the bigger letters at least were really distinct while on the HD-DVD it was rather fuzzy. That missing of the highest frequncy response parts of the picture .is one of the things that separate the good from he great releases.

  15. Garysb

    Are the panel lines visible on the DCP of HTWWW ?

    I'm going to make an assumption here [dangerous, I know, but still]:
    1. The DCP for HTWWW is derived from the WB restoration undertaken for the BD; therefore
    2. The panel lines should be no more visible in the DCP than they are on the BD
    Also, any scenes shot in Ultra Panavision or Todd-AO for HTWWW [and yes, there are a few, including stock footage borrowed from Raintree County and process shots using rear projected UP elements] shouldn't have panel lines.

  16. Stephen_J_H

    I'd love to attend, but it's not going to work with my schedule. *sigh* I'm hoping there will be future events of this kind.

    Same here. I'm out of vacation days for calendar year 2018, so I just don't have the ability to take the time off from work to fly to California for this. But I would be absolutely delighted to do so in the future.

    That would be my one humble request for the organizers of this festival – and I realize it's not always possible – but I think there are people from around the country who would be very happy to attend something like this, but need a bit more time to be able to arrange to have the time off from work, put money aside for travel and lodging expenses, etc. If it's in any way possible, I would love to get a future "save the date" notice maybe six months or longer in advance so that I could be able to get everything all lined up to be able to visit. I totally get that it's not possible to plan that far in advance for certain things, and I certainly don't begrudge the festival organizers for the shorter lead time on this one, but I hope to be able to attend one day in the future.

    I have never seen a Cinerama film on an actual Cinerama screen. The closest I came was when I visited L.A. in 2014 and saw Ghostbusters at the Dome. I'm so happy I went, but it's just not the same as it would have been seeing a film that was either made in three panel Cinerama, or shot single strip but still intended for the Cinerama screen. That's pretty much my cinema holy grail at this point.

  17. John Sparks

    I saw one movie at the Dome and I, for the life of me, can't remember it. I do remember learning to tiller (steering the back end of a fire truck) in the parking lot back in the late 70's.

    When I converse with you, John, I feel like it's a real life version of Naked City ("there are a million stories in the naked city….) 🙂

    I've seen This Is Cinerama, T2, and Gladiator at the Dome.

  18. I'm so damn old I remember when my dad took my brother and me to the Cinerama theatre in Memphis, Tn. to see This Is Cinerama. I've still got the program given us when we entered the theatre. That experience was the driving force that sent me into a life of movies and theatres. I was never the same again!! The next time I saw a three panel Cinerama presentation was in 2002 at the Dome in Hollywood. The Dome put on a flawless presentation of HTWWW. Good times!!

  19. Would be curious to hear from anyone who sees the DCP version of HTWWW and also saw the 3 panel version at the Dome previously. I was fortunate enough to see the 3 panel version at the Dome during a visit to LA a few years ago and thought it was spectacular. This was the only time I have seen a Cinerama film as it was meant to be seen.

  20. Special guests for Oct 21st showing of How “The West Was Won” will be Todd Fisher, Debbie Reynold’s son, who was often on the set with his Mom. He is planning to bring some home movies the family shot during the filming. Also actor Stanley Livingston (who played George Peppard’s son) will be there.

    For the “Mad Mad World” screening Director Stanley Kramer’s wife, Karen Kramer and daughter will talk before the film along with Sandy Hackett, Buddy’s son.

  21. DFurr

    I know I'm in the minority here but for some reason I just can't get excited about a DCP of a 3 panel Cinerama treasure.

    Get excited then. I've seen them all in DCP at Bradford and can recommend them.

    (apart from TWWOTBG obviously which I've only seen in 3 panel).

  22. nara

    Get excited then. I've seen them all in DCP at Bradford and can recommend them.

    (apart from TWWOTBG obviously which I've only seen in 3 panel).

    Well here in podunk Alabama, our chances to see these classics on a big screen are exactly nil. 🙂

  23. Did any of the Cinerama Dome aficionados here happen to attend the screening of GRAND PRIX the other night at the Cinerama Festival and hear what a guest speaker said about there being a restoration in the works for THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF THE BROTHERS GRIMM? A good friend of mine was there, heard it, but he did not know there is a bit of a raging debate on the subject on another thread here so he did not make a note of who the speaker was or how much authority he might have to make such an announcement. Just trying to find out if anyone can corroborate what was actually said about a restoration of that movie.

    Thanks for any help you can offer.

  24. As someone with a measure of experience with MAD WORLD, I can tell you that the DCP is sharper than a 70mm print. Take the climactic chase. In 70mm, the theatre marquee is not legible. In digital, it's clear as crystal: GREGORY PECK ROBERT MITCHUM CAPE FEAR. (As I mentioned on the commentary track, Barrie Chase is coincidentally in both films.)

    As for sitting close, Lowell Thomas himself said that the first three rows provided the optimal viewing experience. I always sit in the front row if it's available. As Jim Backus says, "It's the only way to fly!"

    Mike S.

  25. cadavra

    As someone with a measure of experience with MAD WORLD, I can tell you that the DCP is sharper than a 70mm print. Take the climactic chase. In 70mm, the theatre marquee is not legible. In digital, it's clear as crystal: GREGORY PECK ROBERT MITCHUM CAPE FEAR. (As I mentioned on the commentary track, Barrie Chase is coincidentally in both films.)

    As for sitting close, Lowell Thomas himself said that the first three rows provided the optimal viewing experience. I always sit in the front row if it's available. As Jim Backus says, "It's the only way to fly!"

    Mike S.

    I totally disagree with you. Digital projection in cinemas has NO DEPTH -a common complaint from many film critics. I saw IAMMMMW many times in cinerama where I worked on it's original release. I very rarely visit a cinema now as I hate the extremely poor quality of the projected digital image-lacking in both clarity and depth. If digital was really that good then why do many film buffs prefer seeing a film in 35mm rather than digital, if given the choice? Why are people still flocking to see 70mm films if given the preference between digital and film projection. If treated with respect film will last for generations longer than that of the digital version .Remember that digital images don't last forever.

  26. cinemiracle

    I totally disagree with you. Digital projection in cinemas has NO DEPTH -a common complaint from many film critics. I saw IAMMMMW many times in cinerama where I worked on it's original release. I very rarely visit a cinema now as I hate the extremely poor quality of the projected digital image-lacking in both clarity and depth. If digital was really that good then why do many film buffs prefer seeing a film in 35mm rather than digital, if given the choice? Why are people still flocking to see 70mm films if given the preference between digital and film projection. If treated with respect film will last for generations longer than that of the digital version .Remember that digital images don't last forever.

    Also why are studios still producing new 35mm prints of many classic films if digital is superior?

  27. cinemiracle

    Also why are studios still producing new 35mm prints of many classic films if digital is superior?

    Several years ago the demand for 35mm film (especially for release prints ) had dropped so precipitously that it looked like there wouldn't be enough business to allow even one lab/supplier to stay afloat. The studios committed to a deal which guarantees a minimum purchase of film per year to allow the few remaining labs to stay open. Most 35mm is used for archival purposes ( yes, everything is still turned into 35mm negative at the major studios) or for the remaining filmmakers who still choose to shoot on film. Throwing off a few 35mm prints for the rep circuit to meet a purchase quota is no real indication of anything.

  28. cinemiracle

    I totally disagree with you. Digital projection in cinemas has NO DEPTH -a common complaint from many film critics. I saw IAMMMMW many times in cinerama where I worked on it's original release. I very rarely visit a cinema now as I hate the extremely poor quality of the projected digital image-lacking in both clarity and depth. If digital was really that good then why do many film buffs prefer seeing a film in 35mm rather than digital, if given the choice? Why are people still flocking to see 70mm films if given the preference between digital and film projection. If treated with respect film will last for generations longer than that of the digital version .Remember that digital images don't last forever.

    We're talking about exhibition. Film is still mandatory for preservation, and should also be available for production to them what prefers it (Nolan, Scorsese, Spielberg, Tarantino, etc.). But I've seen film and DCP projected back-to-back (as double features), and there is no competition. The digital image is brighter, sharper, cleaner, always in focus, in frame, correct lens/aspect ratio, no scratches, splices, burns, missing footage, jiggling from missing perfs, tears, blown reel changes or motorboating on the soundtrack. Those who stubbornly cling to film as an exhibition medium are the descendants of those who once said, "Oh, sure, the automobile is all well and good, but I like my horse and buggy. I can brush him, feed him sugar cubes and clean up after him." Times change, technology changes, and we have to change with them or get left behind.

    Mike S.

  29. cadavra

    We're talking about exhibition. Film is still mandatory for preservation, and should also be available for production to them what prefers it (Nolan, Scorsese, Spielberg, Tarantino, etc.). But I've seen film and DCP projected back-to-back (as double features), and there is no competition. The digital image is brighter, sharper, cleaner, always in focus, in frame, correct lens/aspect ratio, no scratches, splices, burns, missing footage, jiggling from missing perfs, tears, blown reel changes or motorboating on the soundtrack. Those who stubbornly cling to film as an exhibition medium are the descendants of those who once said, "Oh, sure, the automobile is all well and good, but I like my horse and buggy. I can brush him, feed him sugar cubes and clean up after him." Times change, technology changes, and we have to change with them or get left behind.

    Mike S.

    Everyone is entitled to their own opinions.You have yours and I have mine. I still disagree with you .I worked in the industry for 45 years so I know what I am talking about.

  30. After working in the industry for over 40 years I agree with Mike S. (Cadavers). I been trough the changes from carbon Arc to xenon Bulb, from reel to reel to platters, from 35mm projectors to digital projectors. Digital presentations are almost perfect. I know there are true projectionists that would make any 35/70 presentation perfect, but they are rarely employed theses days and I went through the days of the high school projectionists (shudder) and the patron does not have to endur those days now in the almost flawless digital presentations and the patron is what it’s all about.

  31. cinemiracle

    Everyone is entitled to their own opinions.You have yours and I have mine. I still disagree with you .I worked in the industry for 45 years so I know what I am talking about.

    I've also been in the business for 45 years. Exhibition, distribution, marketing, production. Seen it all, done it all. Which makes your opinion equivalent to mine.

    Mike S.

  32. cadavra

    I've also been in the business for 45 years. Exhibition, distribution, marketing, production. Seen it all, done it all. Which makes your opinion equivalent to mine.

    Mike S.

    All one has to have is a certain appreciation of film and how it looks and then one can compare that to a digital version. If done reasonably well I would have to give the edge to a digital presentation on the right equipment over most analog presentations.

    Doing analog right is that much harder and even if you do everything right on the equioment dise you can be let down by subpar film prints, we all have been there.

    When analog is done right and with really good prints it has something special that's not quite there yet with digital imo but who can really say that he has experienced that regularly in his local cinema across a large number of movies and prints?

    And then digital still has fantastic potential in areas that analog never had like correct framing and much less overscan on deeply curved screens for example, that already is pretty spectacular with 4k projectors but it will be even better when we have 8k projectors.

  33. Saw Bohemian Rhapsody at the Washighton DC Uptown theatre yesterday. It's one of the few remaining Cinerama theatres that still shows movies on a deeply curved screen. The presentation was not as good as what you would see at the LA Cinerama Dome. The image did not fill the screen, was off center, had side masking on the left but not on the right. and part of the image was cut off in the buttom right and left corners.

  34. The Uptown, where 2001 had its world premiere in 1968, used to be a great venue. Seeing LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, VERTIGO, MY FAIR LADY, and others in 70mm was incredible. In the last years of using film projection, they got rid of union projectionists and predictably quality suffered. I have not returned there since they went digital but your report mirrors what I have heard. At one time it was worth driving the 100 miles to see a movie at the Uptown. Sadly this is no longer true.

  35. RolandL

    Saw Bohemian Rhapsody at the Washighton DC Uptown theatre yesterday. It's one of the few remaining Cinerama theatres that still shows movies on a deeply curved screen. The presentation was not as good as what you would see at the LA Cinerama Dome. The image did not fill the screen, was off center, had side masking on the left but not on the right. and part of the image was cut off in the buttom right and left corners.

    Compared to analog it really does not take much effort to get digital projection right but you can always count on somebody being up to the task of messing that up, too.

  36. Last night the Dome was spectacular with a perfect presentation of It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World. I saw the film in its re-release decades ago and have not seen it on a big screen since. Only with the purchase of VHS, the wonderful Laser, DVD, Blu-Ray and finally the Criterion Blu-Ray, so seeing on the huge dome screen was a magnificent experience.

  37. Thanks for that -we worked very hard to make the Dome Birthday screenings look and sound great on the full Cinerama screen. The complements we got at intermission and after the show last night about the image and sound quality, not to mention the old fashioned roadshow showmanship, were heart warming to both John Sittig myself, and the projection team. Karen Kramer, Sandy Hackett and actress Barrie Chase had some funny stories to tell.

    We had a few important Arclight executives attend who were also amazed with the sold out crowd and had quite big smiles on their faces. Visitors from New York City, New Orleans and even Sweden got on planes just for this show. Now we have to figure out what to do for next fall, or perhaps sooner!

  38. RolandL

    Saw Bohemian Rhapsody at the Washighton DC Uptown theatre yesterday. It's one of the few remaining Cinerama theatres that still shows movies on a deeply curved screen. The presentation was not as good as what you would see at the LA Cinerama Dome. The image did not fill the screen, was off center, had side masking on the left but not on the right. and part of the image was cut off in the buttom right and left corners.

    I saw BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY at the Uptown as well. While its sound system didn't disappoint, I am surprised that the owners have not adjusted the masking since they replaced their film projectors with a digital system. It's been at least eight years now! (Image is of a pre-show advertisement, not the movie, and is intentionally overexposed to show the full screen area)

    View attachment 51623

  39. Are you saying that is an accurate representation of what Bohemian Rhapsody looked like in that theater – that is shameful and why I don't go to movie theaters anymore. And it looks from the size of the audience that others are just like me.

  40. haineshisway

    Are you saying that is an accurate representation of what Bohemian Rhapsody looked like in that theater – that is shameful and why I don't go to movie theaters anymore. And it looks from the size of the audience that others are just like me.

    Sadly yes, that is what both BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY and, three weeks ago, A STAR IS BORN looked like on the Uptown screen. (I mentioned that the image was not from the feature film only to keep 20th Century Fox lawyers off my back – the pre-show trailers and the feature all use the same projector)

    Prior to around 1981, the Uptown would manually install masking for 35mm anamorphic and 35mm spherical images, but improved technology allowed them to show 35mm on the full screen starting I believe with Milos Forman's RAGTIME. So adding supplemental masking for what is now the new screen image shouldn't be out of the question.

    As for the lack of customers, I attended weekend matinees both times and sat in the front row of the balcony so I couldn't see all of the audience downstairs. But I suspect that the era of lines around the block at the Uptown are over.

    Having sad all that, if you ignore the ill-fitting masking, the digital image quality for both RHAPSODY and STAR was pretty good, and the Uptown still has an ambience all its own.

  41. I'm sorry… that ill-fitting masking just can't be ignored. There's no excuse for the sorry lack of showmanship in today's movie houses.. My past experiences in theatres such as the Uptown were so magical that I don't want to sully my memories by seeing the sad state of moviegoing today. I'll stay home and get a more satisfying experience. And that's so sad.

  42. ahollis

    Last night the Dome was spectacular with a perfect presentation of It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World. I saw the film in its re-release decades ago and have not seen it on a big screen since. Only with the purchase of VHS, the wonderful Laser, DVD, Blu-Ray and finally the Criterion Blu-Ray, so seeing on the huge dome screen was a magnificent experience.

    Which version did they show, the general release (154-166 mins.) or Restored (182-197 mins.)?

  43. It was a 179 minute version with the police call intermission. The DCP was corrected to show perfectly on the Dome’s screen filling it completely as if this was a Ulta-Panavision 70mm print. The wizardly work of David Strohmaier and his group should be applauded. The presentation, I think, was as close to the premier 55 years ago as it could get.

  44. ahollis

    It was a 179 minute version with the police call intermission. The DCP was corrected to show perfectly on the Dome’s screen filling it completely as if this was a Ulta-Panavision 70mm print. The wizardly work of David Strohmaier and his group should be applauded. The presentation, I think, was as close to the premier 55 years ago as it could get.

    So it was a DCP of the 163 minute version plus the music-only segments and police calls?

  45. ahollis

    The presentation, I think, was as close to the premier 55 years ago as it could get.

    Glad to hear you liked it that much and you can be happy that the geometry is a lot better now than it used to be. Back then a substantial part of the frame got cut off in the screen center as it was at a much bigger distance to the projector lens than the sides and today it is possible to correct for that in the digital domain.

    I would have really liked to see that on the big screen 🙂

  46. Rob_Ray

    I'm sorry… that ill-fitting masking just can't be ignored. There's no excuse for the sorry lack of showmanship in today's movie houses..

    You think that's bad, most new theaters have screens that are natively 1.85 ratio with NO masking whatsoever, so all scope movies are letterboxed, reducing the theatrical experience to a glorified home projection system. The two dome theaters we had in Sacramento that originally had grand wide screens (which were both split in half in the 70s) were recently torn down and replaced with a new theater all with those type- I'd prayed for years that the domes would be properly restored and to have them replaced with that is purely insulting. But I guess only Los Angeles deserves nice theaters now.

    If we actually had a good theater here I'd go to it weekly regardless of what was playing. As it is now, I don't go to theaters at all anymore (seeing The Last Jedi letterboxed with a ridiculously dark picture was the last straw. I enjoyed it a lot more at home.)

    And I need to add that digital got the scope format COMPLETELY wrong- it works the same way as home formats- it's letterboxed on a native 1.85 frame. 35mm of course used anamorphic lenses, and digital should have either done that or used a native 2.35 frame. At theaters with proper 2.35 screens showing digital, it's actually zoomed losing a bit of resolution in the process.

  47. ahollis

    It was a 179 minute version with the police call intermission. The DCP was corrected to show perfectly on the Dome’s screen filling it completely as if this was a Ulta-Panavision 70mm print. The wizardly work of David Strohmaier and his group should be applauded. The presentation, I think, was as close to the premier 55 years ago as it could get.

    Grand Prix in Bradford was also corrected for the Cinerama screen which also looked fantastic.
    I am looking forward to Ice Station Zebra.

  48. This was an excellent presentation. I had planned a vacation in California that included this date, and I rearranged a couple of hotel stays so I could attend. Two friends from Redondo Beach came up to see it as well. Interestingly, one of them lived in Hollywood 54 years ago and saw IAMMMMW at the Dome late in its original run (I think it ran for over a year).

    Congrats on an artistic and commercial success. Hopefully it will open the door to more of these special events at the Dome. How about some screenings of the original Star Wars trilogy – I bet those would be huge.

    Well done!

    Strohmaier

    Thanks for that -we worked very hard to make the Dome Birthday screenings look and sound great on the full Cinerama screen. The complements we got at intermission and after the show last night about the image and sound quality, not to mention the old fashioned roadshow showmanship, were heart warming to both John Sittig myself, and the projection team. Karen Kramer, Sandy Hackett and actress Barrie Chase had some funny stories to tell.

    We had a few important Arclight executives attend who were also amazed with the sold out crowd and had quite big smiles on their faces. Visitors from New York City, New Orleans and even Sweden got on planes just for this show. Now we have to figure out what to do for next fall, or perhaps sooner!

  49. Strohmaier

    Thanks for that -we worked very hard to make the Dome Birthday screenings look and sound great on the full Cinerama screen.
    !

    Were there any difficulties in getting proper corner-to-corner focus with the curved screen?

  50. diverdave

    This was an excellent presentation. I had planned a vacation in California that included this date, and I rearranged a couple of hotel stays so I could attend. Two friends from Redondo Beach came up to see it as well. Interestingly, one of them lived in Hollywood 54 years ago and saw IAMMMMW at the Dome late in its original run (I think it ran for over a year).

    Congrats on an artistic and commercial success. Hopefully it will open the door to more of these special events at the Dome. How about some screenings of the original Star Wars trilogy – I bet those would be huge.

    Well done!

    The Hateful Eight in glorious Ultra Panavision would be cool on the Cinerama screen.

    View attachment 51856

  51. RolandL

    The Hateful Eight in glorious Ultra Panavision would be cool on the Cinerama screen.

    View attachment 51856

    Agreed, it looks pretty good even though it is mostly an indoor shoot.

    If only I liked the movie more. I love Ultra Panavision as a format but the over the top violence in the last third of the movie does not work for me at all and would be more fitting for some kind of low budget grindhouse style movie.

  52. I saw an original Ultra Panavision print of Mutiny on the Bounty this year at Bradford on the Cinerama screen.
    It was very pink but good 6 track. It was projected with an original D-150 lens so we still had the squeeze
    but still looked very good.

    The Hateful Eight in London did look great on the screen.

    You cannot beat a bit of UP70:)

  53. Garysb

    Would be curious to hear from anyone who sees the DCP version of HTWWW and also saw the 3 panel version at the Dome previously. I was fortunate enough to see the 3 panel version at the Dome during a visit to LA a few years ago and thought it was spectacular. This was the only time I have seen a Cinerama film as it was meant to be seen.

    You saw Cinerama at the Dome on a 125 degree curved screen. Cinerama originally was projected onto 145 degree screens.That was the only way to really see 3 panel Cinerama.I saw all the 3 panel Cinerama films many times and all were seen on 145 degree screens.

  54. nara

    A completely meaningless judgement which doesn’t stand up to scrutiny on any level whatsoever.

    At last year's Cannes film festival a film critic said the following : " Digital projection is death in motion – as if all the light in the image has been sucked into a black hole. Looking at four or five digitally projected movies in a day is depressing.Yes we've become acclimated to digital and many newcomers to Cannes have no memory of anything else.
    But there is a reason that vinyl is back.People are sick of listening to their music digitally even if it's convenient and overdosing on digital movies is just as sickening. " This extract of his Cannes Festival review was printed in the esteemed British Film Institute's magazine SIGHT AND SOUND – possibly the most respected film magazine in the world.

  55. cinemiracle

    At last year's Cannes film festival a film critic said the following : " Digital projection is death in motion – as if all the light in the image has been sucked into a black hole. Looking at four or five digitally projected movies in a day is depressing.Yes we've become acclimated to digital and many newcomers to Cannes have no memory of anything else.
    But there is a reason that vinyl is back.People are sick of listening to their music digitally even if it's convenient and overdosing on digital movies is just as sickening. " This extract of his Cannes Festival review was printed in the esteemed British Film Institute's magazine SIGHT AND SOUND – possibly the most respected film magazine in the world.

    That's nothing but an argument from authority. "I'm right because an authority says I'm right". Nonsense. It one man's OPINION, and it's no more right than anyone else's. BTW, vinyl still represents a TINY fraction of all the music listened to today.

  56. DP 70

    I saw an original Ultra Panavision print of Mutiny on the Bounty this year at Bradford on the Cinerama screen.
    It was very pink but good 6 track. It was projected with an original D-150 lens so we still had the squeeze
    but still looked very good.

    The Hateful Eight in London did look great on the screen.

    You cannot beat a bit of UP70:)

    Ahhh, Mutiny on the Bounty, the memories…

    Saw it twice projected in UP70 with the proper 1.25 attachment but both times with little to no color, hopefully warner will see the light and give it to us in at least a good Blu-ray version.

    That super curvulon lens is beautiful. I once had one but only for a few days as,I acquired it for somebody else who needs it more than I do.

  57. cinemiracle

    At last year's Cannes film festival a film critic said the following : " Digital projection is death in motion – as if all the light in the image has been sucked into a black hole…etc.

    You believe everything that film critics tell you? 🙄

  58. OliverK

    Ahhh, Mutiny on the Bounty, the memories…

    Saw it twice projected in UP70 with the proper 1.25 attachment but both times with little to no color, hopefully Warner will see the light and give it to us in at least a good Blu-ray version.

    That super curvulon lens is beautiful. I once had one but only for a few days as I acquired it for somebody else who needs it more than I do.

    If you are referring to the 1962 Mutiny, which I believe you are, there is a decent blu-Ray out on Warner’s.

  59. Dee Zee

    If you are referring to the 1962 Mutiny, which I believe you are, there is a decent blu-Ray out on Warner’s.

    Unfortunately the Blu-ray is very soft and does not do justice to how magnificent Mutiny on the Bounty must have looked back then in unfaded 70mm prints.

  60. RolandL

    It is better than UP70 titles Hallelujah Trail (probably the worst Blu-ray ever) and The Greatest Story Ever Told, and an upgrade to the DVD, but could be sharper.

    You are correct about Mutiny being better than these two, but that is not really much of an achievement if you look at the competition and at how good Ben-Hur looks or IAMMMMW..

  61. john a hunter

    It's a real shame that three UP70 titles are among the worst looking titles available on BD, when they have the potential to be amongst the best.

    It's a shame that the first movie filmed in UP70 – (really MGM Camera 65) was never released in 70mm and is only available on VHS tape and laser disc – Raintree County.

  62. RolandL

    Too bad they couldn't get a road show Cinerama poster for IAMMMMW. That's the movie poster for a 35mm release.

    That poster the man is standing next to is from the 1970 re-release, which was done by the legendary cartoonist Jack Davis, who's known for his caricatures. The Red and Black poster below was done by the great Saul Bass, the same man who did the crazy animated opening credits to this film as well.

  63. Likewise. Loved it. My only regret was that they felt (or knew) that they had to have a title card for the overture.

    In the theater!

    At least it was a designed one, not just the word. And of course I understand. Even if they had dispensed with the card, the "culture" of getting settled with the house lights going to half, etc., no longer exists for moviegoers. It was a foreign enough concept for these young 'uns as it was, and we're lucky to have gotten that much.

  64. RolandL

    It's a shame that the first movie filmed in UP70 – (really MGM Camera 65) was never released in 70mm and is only available on VHS tape and laser disc – Raintree County.

    Very true but at least if we get it then it will look better than the other three, hopefully soon.

  65. Having seen "Mad, Mad World" in multiple venues over the many years, it is safe to say that after attending the Cinerama Dome's 55th Anniversary, the classic film looked the best I have ever seen that night.
    Right from the beginning, we could see this presentation was in the best hands – the correct greenish opening title card, and Dave Strohmaier and crew even matched up the first graphic with the original IN CINERAMA card..!
    The directional sound found its visual partner in the authentic wrap-around Cinerama feel. The car chases were re-discovered in their balletic movement. There were quite a few in the sold-out crown that had never seen "Mad, Mad World" until that night, and how lucky for them to have watched it via the impressive work of Dave Strohmaier. After tackling the near impossible job of "upgrading" the classic three-strip Cinerama films for a new and appreciative audience, it's most appreciated that he and his associates put the same care into the "Single-Lens" entries.!
    An amazing evening! Thanks to Dave and his team, and the staff of the Cinerama Dome!View attachment 52684

  66. ahollis

    After working in the industry for over 40 years I agree with Mike S. (Cadavers). I been trough the changes from carbon Arc to xenon Bulb, from reel to reel to platters, from 35mm projectors to digital projectors. Digital presentations are almost perfect. I know there are true projectionists that would make any 35/70 presentation perfect, but they are rarely employed theses days and I went through the days of the high school projectionists (shudder) and the patron does not have to endur those days now in the almost flawless digital presentations and the patron is what it’s all about.

    Can someone then explain to me why Christopher Nolan is one of the loudest proponents of celluloid (his words,not mine) and the immersive cinema experience that it gives. Quentin Tarantino is another such person. Q.T.'s HATEFUL 8 in celluloid was an unforgettable experience. Nobody has yet to give me a satisfying answer as to why a massive number of cinemagoers still prefer celluloid projection to digital.There is no comparison with digital Imax as against celluloid.It is the same with 70mm. Perhaps one day it may happen but there is still a very long way to go. Why are they still making new prints of old 70mm films when digital copies would have been much cheaper?

  67. cinemiracle

    Why are they still making new prints of old 70mm films when digital copies would have been much cheaper?

    In the last 15 years there were only very few prints made apart from Fox, with most movies held by Warner, Universal and MGM not being available as new 70mm prints.

    Sony did pretty well, too with 2 out of 3 movies shot in 65mm being available but recently LoA has only been reprinted as a digital filmout which to me does not really make that much sense as going from analog to digital and back is kind of defeating the purpose of having an analog medium.

    So yes there are prints of older movies still available but not much has been truly printed in the analog realm in the last years and I doubt that we will ever see another completely analog print being struck of Mutiny on the Bounty, Ryan's Daughter or The Greatest Story ever Told even when their negatives remain in good shape.

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