BVHE Press Release: Lady and The Tramp: Signature Collection (Blu-ray)

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“Lady and the Tramp” Wags Its Way into the Walt Disney Signature Collection

on Digital Feb. 20 and on Blu-ray™ Feb. 27

Experience the timeless tale three different ways along with all-new bonus features!

BURBANK, Calif. (Jan. 4, 2018) — This February, Disney’s cherished animated classic, “Lady and the Tramp,” joins the highly celebrated Walt Disney Signature Collection. Every member of the family will treasure this timeless tale—loaded with three versions of the film, classic bonus material and three all-new features—when it heads home on Digital and on Movie Anywhere Feb. 20 and on Blu-ray on Feb. 27.

The Walt Disney Signature Collection edition offers three exciting ways to watch “Lady and the Tramp”—the original theatrical version, sing-along mode and Walt’s story meetings—both Digitally and via the Multi-screen Edition (formerly the Blu-ray Combo Pack). The Multi-screen Edition includes Blu-ray, DVD and a Digital copy, giving in-home consumers the flexibility to watch the film on different devices. In addition to classic bonus features, all-new extras invite viewers to enter Walt Disney’s original office suite on the Studio lot, discover Walt’s personal passion for pups, and receive a celebrity-hosted spaghetti and meatballs cooking lesson.

As one of the greatest love stories ever told, “Lady and the Tramp” is sure to melt the hearts of generations with its beloved characters, brilliant animation, memorable music and sweet sentiment. The animated treasure tells the story of Lady, a lovingly pampered cocker spaniel, and Tramp, a freewheeling mutt with a heart of gold. Through the Signature Collection edition, viewers can relive the pair’s thrilling adventures, sing along with the film’s unforgettable songs like “Bella Notte,” and swoon over one of the most memorable movie moments of all time—the iconic scene in which Lady and Tramp share a plate of spaghetti and an accidental kiss.

“Lady and the Tramp” is the sixth title to join the Walt Disney Signature Collection, which includes groundbreaking films created or inspired by the imagination and legacy of Walt Disney, featuring timeless stories and characters that have touched generations. The film takes its place alongside “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “Pinocchio,” “Bambi” and “The Lion King.”

Bonus Features:

BLU-RAY & DIGITAL*:

Film Versions

  • Original Theatrical Edition – Enjoy this cherished Disney classic that captivates audiences of all ages.
  • Sing-Along Mode – Sing along with all your favorite songs as you watch the movie.
  • Inside Walt’s Story Meetings – As you view the film, hear reenactments of Walt’s story sessions with animators and see how their ideas were realized on-screen.

New Signature Bonus

  • Walt & His Dogs – Through archival recordings and photos, hear the tales of the dogs Walt Disney owned and loved over his lifetime.
  • Stories from Walt’s Office – Take a tour of Walt’s office suite on the Studio lot, carefully re-created to look just as it did when he occupied it.
  • How to Make a Meatball and Other Fun Facts About “Lady and The Tramp” – Watch a delicious lesson on how to make perfect meatballs with teen chef Amber Kelley and Oh My Disney Show Host Alexys Gabrielle.

Songs

  • “Peace on Earth”
  • “What Is a Baby/La La Lu”
  • “The Siamese Cat Song”
  • “Bella Notte”
  • “He’s a Tramp”

Classic Bonus Features

  • Diane Disney Miller: Remembering Dad – Walt’s daughter shares memories of her father and Disneyland’s early days, as well as a look at his apartment above the firehouse.
  • Never-Recorded Song – “I’m Free as the Breeze” – Take a listen to a song originally meant to be sung by Tramp.

Deleted Scenes

  • Introduction of Boris – Tramp wasn’t always meant to be Lady’s only suitor. Meet Boris the aristocrat and Homer the peasant in this deleted scene.
  • Waiting for Baby – Lady watches as Jim Dear plans out his new son’s future in this early storyboard.
  • Dog Show – See the storyboards for this deleted scene in which Lady and Tramp unexpectedly find themselves in the middle of a dog show.

Classic Bonus Features on Digital Only*

  • Lady’s Pedigree: The Making of “Lady and the Tramp” – A behind-the-scenes look at the making of Walt Disney’s first feature-length animated film based on an original story.
  • Finding Lady: The Art of the Storyboard – Explore the origins of the storyboard and how they’re used by filmmakers today.
  • Original 1943 Storyboard Version of the Film – View a unique presentation of the original 1943 storyboards for “Lady and the Tramp.”
  • PuppyPedia: Going to the Dogs – Wild and wacky comedian Fred Willard takes us on an outing to the dog park to learn all about dogs and their owners.

Deleted Scenes

  • Turning the Tables – In this story-reel presentation, Tramp dreams of a world where dogs run the show and humans are on the other end of the leash.
  • The Arrival of Baby – In this alternate scene re-created from original storyboards and with original voice talent, Lady makes way for a new arrival.
  • Baby Arrives – Lady is baffled by the strange goings-on in the house—the arrival of a squealing bundle only deepens the mystery.
  • Lady’s Sweater – Lady gets a new sweater for her birthday and must figure out an ingenious way to lose it for good.

Trailers

  • 1955 Original Theatrical Trailer – More than just a trailer, this preview features several minutes of footage from the film and introduces each major character.
  • 1972 Theatrical Re-Issue Trailer – This trailer from the 1972 rerelease heralds Disney’s “happiest motion picture.”
  • 1986 Theatrical Re-Issue Trailer – Released theatrically for the 1986 holiday season, this trailer highlights the love story between Lady and the handsome Tramp.

*Bonus features may vary by retailer

DISC SPECIFICATIONS:

Product SKUs: Multi-screen Edition (Blu-ray, DVD, Digital Copy), Digital HD/SD, DVD

Feature Run Time: Approximately 76 minutes

Rating: G in U.S. and Canada

Aspect Ratio: 2.55:1

Audio: Blu-ray = English 7.1 & 2.0 DTS-HDMA, Spanish and French 5.1 Dolby Digital Language Tracks

DVD = English, Spanish, and French 5.1 Dolby Digital Language Tracks, English 2.0 Dolby Digital Language Track.

Digital = English, Spanish, and French 5.1 or 2.0 Dolby Digital Language Tracks (platform dependent)

Subtitles: Blu-ray = French, Spanish, English SDH, English ESL

DVD = French, Spanish, English SDH, English ESL, English Closed Captions

Digital = French, Spanish, English SDH, English Closed Captions

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35 Comments

  1. Josh Steinberg

    I missed this the first time around so it's a no-brainer for me to pick it up this time.

    Sure do wish the Academy version had been included as a bonus feature.

    Yep, that would have given this package a real cause for double dipping.

  2. Josh Steinberg

    Sure do wish the Academy version had been included as a bonus feature.

    I agree, bu I don't think the Academy version has been released, period. I'm pretty sure the VHS I had, and the Platinum DVD, included pan & scan versions of the widescreen print.

    Some of those new bonus features, especially the ones about Walt, do sound tempting. I will wait to hear how good they are (and how lengthy) before I decide if this is worth another buy, but I won't categorically rule it out.

    I do not like the new cover art though. Also, the exclusion of all the bonus features from the prior edition to digital only continues to be problematic, as was previously the case with The Lion King. I wouldn't give up my previous copy for this one.

  3. Mark-P

    I don’t see the the inclusion of the original 3.0 channel mix that was on the last Blu-ray.

    Good catch, Mark.

    I don't really see any reason why they should drop it, but what they should do and what they actually do are two different things, so you never know with Disney.

  4. Josh Steinberg

    I missed this the first time around so it's a no-brainer for me to pick it up this time.

    Sure do wish the Academy version had been included as a bonus feature.

    I totally agree, as it was not merely a pan and scan version, but a largely re-framed and re-photographed release for theaters who weren't yet set up for CinemaScope. I do not believe this now-rare presentation has appeared on video since its special, separately-packaged laser disc, and I've seen no copies of that on eBay or elsewhere for ages. Finding a copy of it would be like getting one's hands on an uncensored WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT or THE RESCUERS. Any prior or subsequent "fullscreen" release of LATT is a Pan & Scan from the 2.55:1 original.

    And, regarding this ridiculous Signature Edition, look at all the features Disney has so kindly delegated to "Digital Only" this time around. Damned if these second, third and fourth Blu-ray releases don't get further dumbed-down every time. So glad I have the first release, and that I kept the special edition DVD, as I have for all of these animated features. Now, had they added a commentary track and kept all prior special features, I'd be all-in.

  5. Jake Lipson

    I don't think the Academy version has been released, period. I'm pretty sure the VHS I had, and the Platinum DVD, included pan & scan versions of the widescreen print.

    It actually was released…one time only. See my post #7.

  6. I missed the 1st release so this is good news for me. Always enjoyed the widescreen on this one and Sleeping Beauty. The Academy ratio would be a nice bonus but I doubt I would ever watch it just sample it out of curiosity.

  7. Nope. Sorry. Everyone knows I'm a sucker for anything Disney, but there's nothing on this one to make me bite. I'll be happy with my BD until the eventual 4k remaster (or whatever they want to call it).

    No, I don't know 4k will happen via any source. Yes, I do think it will happen. It's a revenue stream and future proofs the film for all mediums.

  8. Mark-P

    Unless it’s a misprint (and may very likely be) I don’t see the the inclusion of the original 3.0 channel mix that was on the last Blu-ray.

    So, Disney's CinemaScope titles had only 3 channels not 4 like other studios?

  9. Dick

    I totally agree, as it was not merely a pan and scan version, but a largely re-framed and re-photographed release for theaters who weren't yet set up for CinemaScope. I do not believe this now-rare presentation has appeared on video since its special, separately-packaged laser disc, and I've seen no copies of that on eBay or elsewhere for ages. Finding a copy of it would be like getting one's hands on an uncensored WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT or THE RESCUERS.

    What was censored in these two films?

    Well, this release stinks. I’ll
    Go look for the older Blu ray.

  10. battlebeast

    What was censored in these two films?

    A couple of saucy animator jokes. These were things that would have never been noticed by someone watching the film in a theater but showed up if you had the CAV laserdisc and could go frame-by-frame. In the case of Roger Rabbit, Baby Herman makes a rather crass gesture after walking under the skirt of a lady toward the beginning of the film, Betty Boop has one of her "boops" flop out for a frame, and Jessica Rabbit supposedly shows a little more of herself than was decent in the scene where she is thrown out of Benny the Cab (though this one is up for debate). In The Rescuers, when the mice are riding the seagull down the side of the building, one of the windows they pass has a photograph of an actual nude woman in it.

  11. RolandL

    So, Disney's CinemaScope titles had only 3 channels not 4 like other studios?

    As far as I know, surround was a feature rarely used in Walt Disney's stereo features.
    The only time that I know for sure where it was used was in the closing bars of the score to "20,000 Leagues". The brief surround in that cue was recorded during the music sessions and not the traditional way of mixing a surround channel in to the final dubbing of the film.
    It may have been used in "Sleeping Beauty" and "Grand Canyon Suite" also.

  12. Stephen PI

    As far as I know, surround was a feature rarely used in Walt Disney's stereo features.
    The only time that I know for sure where it was used was in the closing bars of the score to "20,000 Leagues". The brief surround in that cue was recorded during the music sessions and not the traditional way of mixing a surround channel in to the final dubbing of the film.
    It may have been used in "Sleeping Beauty" and "Grand Canyon Suite" also.

    Cough, Cough … Fantasia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fantasia_(1940_film)

    Wikipedia:
    Fantasound Main article: Fantasound The Disney brothers contacted David Sarnoff of RCA regarding the manufacture of a new system that would "create the illusion that the actual symphony orchestra is playing in the theater." Sarnoff backed out at first due to financial reasons, but agreed in July 1939 to make the equipment so long as the Disneys could hold down the estimated $200,000 in costs.[64] Though it was not exactly known how to achieve their goal, engineers at Disney and RCA investigated many ideas and tests made with various equipment setups.[58] The collaboration led to the development of Fantasound, a pioneering stereophonic surround sound system which innovated some processes widely used today, including simultaneous multi-track recording, overdubbing, and noise reduction.[60] Fantasound, developed in part by Disney engineer William Garity, employed two projectors running at the same time. With one containing the picture film with a mono soundtrack for backup purposes, the other ran a sound film that was mixed from the eight tracks recorded at the Academy to four: three of which contained the audio for the left, center, and right stage speakers respectively, while the fourth became a control track with amplitude and frequency tones that drove variable-gain amplifiers to control the volume of the three audio tracks.[58] In addition were three "house" speakers placed on the left, right, and center of the auditorium that derived from the left and right stage channels which acted as surround channels.[60] As the original recording was captured at almost peak modulation to increase signal-to-noise ratio, the control track was used to restore the dynamics to where Stokowski thought they should be. For this, a tone-operated gain-adjusting device was built to control the levels of each of the three audio tracks through the amplifiers.[60] The illusion of sound traveling across the speakers was achieved with a device named the "pan pot", which directed the predetermined movement of each audio channel with the control track. Mixing of the soundtrack required six people to operate the various pan pots in real time, while Stokowski directed each level and pan change which was marked on his musical score. To monitor recording levels, Disney used oscilloscopes with color differentiation to minimize eye fatigue.[65] To test recording equipment and speaker systems, Disney ordered eight electronic oscillators from the newly established Hewlett-Packard company.[66][67] Between the individual takes, prints, and remakes, approximately three million feet of sound film was used in the production of Fantasia.[57] Almost a fifth of the film's budget was spent on its recording techniques.[68]

  13. Lord Dalek

    Those surrounds weren't discrete though.

    Important thing to note about Lady and The Tramp's soundtrack is it was apparently never recorded in Stereo in the first place.

    While I was at Disney I couldn't find any documentation that said the orchestra on "Lady" was recorded multi-track. However the sound efx and some dialog were mixed discretely.

    The orchestra for "20,000 Leagues" was interlocked 2-channel with an occasional center sweetener and the surround at the end.

    "Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom" and "Grand Canyon Scope" final mixes were 3 channel stereo.

  14. Josh Steinberg

    I missed this the first time around so it's a no-brainer for me to pick it up this time.

    Sure do wish the Academy version had been included as a bonus feature.

    Yes, without that, and without an audio commentary, there's no reason for me to buy another blu-ray of my favorite movie from 1955.

  15. Stephen PI

    While I was at Disney I couldn't find any documentation that said the orchestra on "Lady" was recorded multi-track. However the sound efx and some dialog were mixed discretely.

    Yeah I don't know when they recorded the music track for the film but considering this started as an academy mono film and only shifted to Cinemascope late in the game (as a trial balloon for Sleeping Beauty of course), it would not surprise me if it was done much earlier in the production process.

  16. Brian Kidd

    A couple of saucy animator jokes. These were things that would have never been noticed by someone watching the film in a theater but showed up if you had the CAV laserdisc and could go frame-by-frame. In the case of Roger Rabbit, Baby Herman makes a rather crass gesture after walking under the skirt of a lady toward the beginning of the film, Betty Boop has one of her "boops" flop out for a frame, and Jessica Rabbit supposedly shows a little more of herself than was decent in the scene where she is thrown out of Benny the Cab (though this one is up for debate). In The Rescuers, when the mice are riding the seagull down the side of the building, one of the windows they pass has a photograph of an actual nude woman in it.

    I wouldn't call the Baby Herman gesture a "saucy animator joke", and it's not something you needed still frame to no0tice. That's the only example of actual "censorship" in any of these…

  17. Colin Jacobson

    I wouldn't call the Baby Herman gesture a "saucy animator joke", and it's not something you needed still frame to no0tice. That's the only example of actual "censorship" in any of these…

    …and here I thought we were talking about Jessica' Rabbits "missing" undergarment for one cel 😉

  18. Brian Kidd

    Jessica Rabbit supposedly shows a little more of herself than was decent in the scene where she is thrown out of Benny the Cab (though this one is up for debate).

    Not really up for debate. I owned the uncensored CAV and there were perhaps two frames that pretty clearly implied a view similar to that of Sharon Stone's leg uncrossing/crossing in BASIC INSTINCT.

  19. Dick

    Not really up for debate. I owned the uncensored CAV and there were perhaps two frames that pretty clearly implied a view similar to that of Sharon Stone's leg uncrossing/crossing in BASIC INSTINCT.

    I also own that release and have seen the frames. You can see her panties, but there certainly aren't any anatomical details drawn in. It has aired in HD in its uncensored form fairly recently. That makes it even more clear that she's wearing underwear. I mean, it wasn't really a movie made for kids, hence its release under Touchstone. The "Jessica Frames" are pretty tame, but Disney is gonna Disney. There's a Starlog article from August, '89 that discusses things that were cut before the theatrical release including a shot of Baby Herman stuffing money down his "companion's" bra. (The whole run of Starlog is up on the Internet Archive for anyone who may be so inclined.)

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  21. Dick

    I totally agree, as it was not merely a pan and scan version, but a largely re-framed and re-photographed release for theaters who weren't yet set up for CinemaScope. I do not believe this now-rare presentation has appeared on video since its special, separately-packaged laser disc, and I've seen no copies of that on eBay or elsewhere for ages. Finding a copy of it would be like getting one's hands on an uncensored WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT or THE RESCUERS. Any prior or subsequent "fullscreen" release of LATT is a Pan & Scan from the 2.55:1 original.

    There also was Disney's recall of the laserdisc of "The Best of Roger Rabbit." From the LaserDisc Database:

    This disc was recalled by Disney when it came to their attention that the animators had included some "offensive" frames in the third cartoon, "Trail Mix-Up". During the scene in which Roger Rabbit chases Baby Herman through a sawmill, he runs past a poster hanging on the wall. When played at normal speed, this cannot even be seen. However, when played with frame advance, the poster can be seen fairly clearly. It shows a buxom woman in a bikini, straddling a large saw blade in a suggestive pose, with the words "Rigid Tools" at the top. The material in question consists of about a half dozen frames. The most noticeable example is frame 32478, when the poster can be seen clearly. Supposedly, the "official" reason given for the recall was "poor color transfer".

    http://www.lddb.com/laserdisc/06928/5259-CS/Best-of-Roger-Rabbit-(1996)

    One laserdisc dealer, whose name I have forgotten, refused to send his copies back to Disney and made them available to his customers at the list price. That's how I got my copy.

  22. 1955, the year my father was born, was a banner year for Walt thanks in no small part to this, The Mickey Mouse Club, and Davy Crockett. Even if they hedged their bets on the success of CinemaScope by making two versions, it's a shame they couldn't both be on it. That would have been worth an upgrade.

    It's also a shame that Disney didn't use widescreen more in the 1960s and 1970s. Between Swiss Family Robinson and The Black Hole I can't name a single Disney film shot with anamorphic lenses or in a large film format.

    Alberto_D

    Buy it before they cut the spaghetti kiss scene, claiming it's a arrastment for modern world values in a animated movie for kid.

    If that happened — and they'd never censor an iconic, often-parodied movie moment like that — I assumed it would be because of the carb count of the spaghetti. I prefer Cappello's myself.

    As for an example of how the two versions differ:

    [​IMG]

  23. MatthewA

    It's also a shame that Disney didn't use widescreen more in the 1960s and 1970s. Between Swiss Family Robinson and The Black Hole I can't name a single Disney film shot with anamorphic lenses or in a large film format.

    Thanks, Matthew. I love a challenge. Scandalous John 1971.

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