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I’m not a big Star Wars fan so I never bought the OT in Blu Ray. It turns out the prices for used 1k boxed sets has plummeted: I just bought the set for $6 shipped from Amazon. I can live with that price. Seller says the digital version may not work.

Do you think this will happen with other common 1k Blu Ray discs in the used marketplace?
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Josh Steinberg

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I think in general used disc prices for non-rare titles are going down and will continue to fall. I don’t think UHD 4K disc is the primary culprit - I think the general public’s movement away from physical media towards subscription streaming is.

It’s almost like a new car or computer - as long as it’s still on the lot, or shrink wrapped inside the store, it has value, but once you take it out for a spin, it’s worth decreasing dramatically regardless of condition.

Prior to the pandemic I was frequenting a store that bought and sold used physical media - movies, games, books, music, and some other collectibles - and I couldn’t believe how low the prices had gone. Setting aside rare, out-of-print editions, most DVDs were selling for $1 and most BDs were going for $2 to $4.

There really just aren’t that many of us left that view discs as the primary way to view content, while there are lots of people who are getting rid of stuff they used to collect or inherited that they no longer have use for.

If you live in an area where there are stores buying/selling used stuff, now is probably the time to start keeping an eye out.

I have a friend who runs a reselling business, not just media, and his take is that used disc sales may hit a point in the not too distant future where it becomes more trouble than it’s worth for people like him. The amount they’re fetching on eBay and Amazon for him keeps going down but they take up the same amount of space in his storage and take up the same amount of time/effort to process, list package and send, so he’s stopped accepting a lot of discs - just not worth it anymore. I can imagine that that’s not unique to him and his business.
 

Worth

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I don't think it has much to do with 4K as such, but rather with the general availability of the title. At this point, probably anyone who wants a copy of Star Wars on disc already has it, and it's still widely available on DVD, blu-ray, UHD and streaming, so it shouldn't be surprising that used discs aren't worth very much.

The general public has moved on to streaming and has little interest in discs anymore. I think the only discs with resale value going forward will be rare, out of print titles.
 
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Josh Steinberg

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Yeah - you can still get $100 for the right Disney Treasures tin but stuff like Star Wars and James Bond have to be some of the most available discs in the world.
 

Lord Dalek

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UHD doesn't even have close to the same physical footprint as regular blu-ray does so I don't think it has much to do with prices going down. More like its a 10 year old box set that wasn't well received back when it came out,
 

Ethan Riley

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I know people simply giving away huge collections of blu rays and dvds. They're just streaming and say the discs are taking up too much space in their apartments or houses. The only discs worth anything are rare, oop or foreign titles that never got released in the U.S.
 

Nick*Z

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I know people simply giving away huge collections of blu rays and dvds. They're just streaming and say the discs are taking up too much space in their apartments or houses. The only discs worth anything are rare, oop or foreign titles that never got released in the U.S.
Can't disagree with you more. There's not substitute for native 1080p or native 4K disc content. Neither is accurately reproduced in streaming without an algorithm being applied to compress the data. Some data compressions are better than others. But if you want to have as close to possible a night 'at the movies' in projection, you absolutely NEED physical media to effectively fuel your projector or large format TV screen with properly upscaled content and maximize its essential capacity for video processing. Streaming still doesn't do that. In the foreseeable future? Perhaps. But not a given.

Once again, disc ownership separates the true collector from the novice and the discerning videophile from the casual viewer of movies, not as movies, but merely content, to be viewed then discarded for the next best thing. To be sure, there are more casual participants than collectors. That's always been the case. But it really is an apples to giraffes sort of comparison. One group treasures movie culture as art. The other decidedly does not. Just saying.
 

Josh Steinberg

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Not only do I disagree with everything there, I also find it enormously offputting to see personal preferences to watch on one format or another being some kind of bizarre purity test for how big a movie fan an individual is. It’s getting a bit tiresome to be told again and again that people who prefer a different format don’t appreciate art. That’s ludicrous.
 

AnthonyClarke

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I love my hard copy DVDs and Blu rays ... although I do get streaming versions if nothing else available.
But I have found that when I try to offload unwanted discs, either Blu ray or DVDs, no-one is interested, for cash or for free. My son is typical .. I don't want to clutter the place up, he says, while happily watching imagel-compromised versions instead.
Even some famous Criterion editions such as my 'suitcase' Truffaut Antoine Doinel cycle (now redundant because of the UK boxed Blu ray set) doesn't get a sniff of interest on Ebay.
 

TravisR

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Not only do I disagree with everything there, I also find it enormously offputting to see personal preferences to watch on one format or another being some kind of bizarre purity test for how big a movie fan an individual is. It’s getting a bit tiresome to be told again and again that people who prefer a different format don’t appreciate art. That’s ludicrous.
As someone who has no interest in switching to digital (though it's undeniably the future), I agree with you.
 

RichMurphy

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Historically, the vast majority of movie watchers couldn't care less about reduction of picture quality:

Movie palace -> shoebox multiplex;
Todd-AO -> CinemaScope;
3-panel Cinerama -> 65mm Cinerama;
IMAX -> "Liemax";
watching films on a big screen -> watching on a laptop, phone, or iPad;
stretching images horizontally to fill a 16:9 flat-panel TV screen.

What matters to most people is the content itself, not what it looks like. Luckily, I ain't "most people". :)
 

OliverK

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Not only do I disagree with everything there, I also find it enormously offputting to see personal preferences to watch on one format or another being some kind of bizarre purity test for how big a movie fan an individual is. It’s getting a bit tiresome to be told again and again that people who prefer a different format don’t appreciate art. That’s ludicrous.
Not my kind of art that gives me one version of a movie today and another one tomorrow,. I hate the whole concept of a company selling something that they or the studio that owns the content may change at any time according to the fine print on their website.

Other than that I agree that buying expensive media does not make somebody more arty than the next person. Sometimes I have a feeling that the opposite may be the case where only the highest picture and sound quality gets accepted regardless of other qualities that a movie may possess.
 

OliverK

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Blu-ray resolution isn't 1K, it's only a handful of pixels less than 2K in the cinema (2048x1080). Just like UHD is slightly less than theatrical 4K - 3840x2160 vs. 4096x2160.
1k is indeed a misnomer that should not be used. I guess it is meant to indicate that Blu-rays are 1080p which one could call 1k. If that would be adopted we would have to call UHD Blu-rays 2k as they are 2160p.

The industry brought that upon itself when they switched from 1080p to 4k as an indicator of a format resolution when really we are talking about 1920 x 1080 and 3840 x 2160 respectively. I guess that one is on the marketing wizards who did not really think that 2160p would sound as cool as 4k.
 

David_B_K

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Once again, disc ownership separates the true collector from the novice and the discerning videophile from the casual viewer of movies, not as movies, but merely content, to be viewed then discarded for the next best thing. To be sure, there are more casual participants than collectors. That's always been the case. But it really is an apples to giraffes sort of comparison. One group treasures movie culture as art. The other decidedly does not. Just saying.
A week ago Saturday my wife and I were watching the Blu-ray of Diamonds Are Forever. We have been slowly making our way through the Bond 50 box set and Diamonds was the next movie on the list (and had never been played before). Just after the car chase scene in Vegas, the disc began to freeze up. I assume it was the layer change. Switched from my Sony player to my Oppo. Same problem. We were now at the halfway point of the movie (or just past it). So I went to the iTunes app on my phone and purchased the HD streaming version for $14.95. We picked up where we left off, and the iTunes version even had the bonus material.

There is a lot to be said for the instant gratification of being able to get right back to the movie in a couple of minutes (aside from the time I wasted trying to get the disc to play). My Bond 50 set is now missing Diamonds Are Forever, but I doubt I will replace it since the new Blu-ray costs more than the iTunes copy (and it's a mediocre Bond film). Yes, we like our physical media as long as it works.
 

Robert Crawford

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Not only do I disagree with everything there, I also find it enormously offputting to see personal preferences to watch on one format or another being some kind of bizarre purity test for how big a movie fan an individual is. It’s getting a bit tiresome to be told again and again that people who prefer a different format don’t appreciate art. That’s ludicrous.
Thanks for posting that as I totally disagree with Nick's assessment about other people, who's viewing habits is different from his own.
 

Worth

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1k is indeed a misnomer that should not be used. I guess it is meant to indicate that Blu-rays are 1080p which one could call 1k. If that would be adopted we would have to call UHD Blu-rays 2k as they are 2160p.

The industry brought that upon itself when they switched from 1080p to 4k as an indicator of a format resolution when really we are talking about 1920 x 1080 and 3840 x 2160 respectively. I guess that one is on the marketing wizards who did not really think that 2160p would sound as cool as 4k.
2K and 4K refer to horizontal resolution, not vertical, so it's 2K because it's 2000 pixels wide (2048 for DCP, 1920 for blu-ray) and 4K because it's 4000 pixels wide (4096 for cinema, 3840 for disc/video).
 

Nick*Z

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Going into this, I just knew I was going to get hammered for an opinion, and frankly, I knew who would come at me first with the mallet. Doesn't matter. I stand by my assessment. Consider this, folks. Some people like to own art. They don't just call up a gallery and say something like, "I have blank wall to fill. Send me over 16 ft. worth of paintings in assorted colors!" Those people prefer disc to streaming, for all the reasons I already mentioned.

To David B K who thinks disc lock-up is a viable reason to prefer streaming over disc ownership, I would merely suggest, first, that your set was an anomaly, not the norm. I own the same set and there is no lock up on my Diamonds Are Forever disc. Agreed, its' an inferior Bond flick.

Second, if you really wanted to replace it, to possess a complete box set in disc format, there are several options at your disposal: first, the item will be exchanged with an original receipt by almost any reputable brick and mortar or on-line retailer as it is undeniably defective.

You could also contact Fox/Disney direct to inquire about replacing the single disc, as I did with my copy of The Black Hole, which locked up repeatedly. It wasn't my player or shoddy authoring on Disney's part. Just one lemon in the mastering process. You get those from time to time. Sorry, but its not a reason to condemn an entire format. I've had many issues with streaming. Don't get me started there.

My only interest here, was not to condemn streamers over disc owners, but to draw a comparative line down the middle. Streamers don't want to own discs, and, generally speaking, disc owners only stream to get their fix when disc content is (A) either out of print, or (B) not available at all.

That doesn't mean one is more worthy than the other. It just separates the ideology each have where viewing movies is concerned. Not judging. Just saying. But again. Sometimes, that alone is cause enough for some to get their knickers in a ball here. Oh well, to each his own. No, really. Really!