Terrific film, good artwork 4.5 Stars

A Quiet Place is a serious, dramatically thrilling film that doesn’t disappoint. It quickly establishes its world, its rules, and the stakes, and carries the audience through a riveting and wholly original experience. This is a rare combination of unrelenting dramatic thrills and an intimate and well-crafted film. Original, beautifully made and performed, with a fascinating central premise and an emotionally resonant focus on family and parenting, A Quiet Place was one of the best films I’d seen in several years, and the sequel due out this Spring, looks very promising. Paramount’s rerelease with steelbook packaging and artwork by Mondo is only for those that simply must have this art or have yet to snag this great looking 4k version of this film.

A Quiet Place (2018)
Released: 06 Apr 2018
Rated: PG-13
Runtime: 90 min
Director: John Krasinski
Genre: Drama, Horror, Sci-Fi
Cast: Emily Blunt, John Krasinski, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe
Writer(s): Bryan Woods (screenplay by), Scott Beck (screenplay by), John Krasinski (screenplay by), Bryan Woods (story by), Scott Beck (story by)
Plot: In a post-apocalyptic world, a family is forced to live in silence while hiding from monsters with ultra-sensitive hearing.
IMDB rating: 7.9
MetaScore: 82

Disc Information
Studio: Paramount
Distributed By: N/A
Video Resolution: 2160p HEVC w/HDR
Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
Audio: Dolby Atmos, English 7.1 Dolby TrueHD, Other
Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish, French, Other
Rating: PG-13
Run Time: 1 Hr. 30 Min.
Package Includes: UHD, Blu-ray, Digital Copy
Case Type: Mondo X Series Steelbook
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: A
Release Date: 03/10/2020
MSRP: $30.99

The Production: 4.5/5

“Who are we if we can’t protect them? We have to protect them.”

Sightless, vicious creatures who hunt using their remarkable sense of sound detection, have decimated the world’s population. One family, the Abbotts, have adapted to the silent life, scouring abandoned shops for supplies, living on a farm, following a routine, and communicating using sign language. A tragedy after one of their supply runs affects the family deeply, in ways that manifest significantly as the unrelenting creatures close in.

A Quiet Place is a superbly crafted thriller, anchored in family dynamics, centered on characters dealing with threats and their internal ramifications. At its heart, it is a meditation on familial grief masquerading as a horror film. In ways that echo Craig T. Nelson and JoBeth Williams as Steve and Diane Freeling in 1982’s Poltergeist, A Quiet Place explores the stresses, drama and psychological damages of a sustained, terrifying threat and the ways in which a family tries to survive against the impossible.

John Krasinski is a revelation in every capacity here. As the film’s director, producer, co-writer and one of the leads, he demonstrates an unassailable grasp of the film he is making. His confidence and certainty in storytelling is key to the film’s success and a wonderful example of a burgeoning filmmaker’s artisanship. There may be a moment or two that stretch credulity, but those are easily forgivable, debatable even, amongst the accomplishments of the film.

The small cast, with Krasinski and real-life wife Emily Blunt portraying parents surviving in the changed world while raising their two surviving children, is flawless. Krasinski, perhaps best known for his role as Jim in the American adaptation of The Office, has a gift of comedic timing, but it has been his dramatic turns where he has most impressed. He was the best thing about Michael Bay’s mixed bag of a film, 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi, where he showed off a muscular, grounded and gritty side to his potential. As the driving creative force behind A Quiet Place, he demonstrates a continuing dramatic evolution. His family-focused, serious-minded character quickly engenders a sense of trust with glances, expressions that carry sadness in his eyes and regret and fear in his weary smiles. It’s a brilliant performance matched by the masterful talents of Emily Blunt. Blunt is equally compelling as she delivers an authentic hybrid of strength and vulnerability, capturing an extreme variation of the kind of inherent protective, loving nature I see in every parent I know. Millicent Simmonds as Regan is quite something. Deaf since infancy, her Regan is arguably the reason the family is still alive, having learned American Sign Language to communicate with her (presumably long before the monster threat arrived). Regan’s inability to hear raises the level of threat against her, and her journey through the film produces perhaps the most emotionally potent arc, and through it all, Simmonds captivating. Noah Jupe portrays Marcus, the uncertain, fearful young boy who must grapple with both the terrifying creature threat, and the protective rules set by his parents. Jupe and Simmonds deliver authenticity in their fear, making scary moments even more intense. They are both superb. The film has just one other actor in the film, a man who appears very briefly playing an unnamed character in a pivotal scene that I won’t spoil, but I will say that it’s a magnificent scene and the talented character actor who pulls it off, Leon Russom, owns the scene (you can check out my interview with Russom here, but only after you’ve seen the film).

Creating a film where silence is dominant was a bold endeavor. Fortunately, audiences were rapt by the film and, by all accounts, respected the silent theaters. It’s an atmospheric masterpiece, building a defined world, contained and real, and an intense atmosphere as much thrilling as terrifying. Billed as a horror film, I suppose it is, but it best succeeds when viewed as a thriller, with elements of Hitchcock woven in to ramp up the tension audiences will experience when they know something the characters don’t (classic Hitchcock). It is a relentless experience, placing characters in danger, and building upon that danger with new layers of threats. It pulls the threads of tension, upping consequences, and pulling us in, inch by inch, into the frames of the film.

Video: 5/5

3D Rating: NA

This new steel book edition of Paramount’s A Quiet Place is the same UHD disc previously released. As I said of that edition, it is of stunning quality. The film contains excellent cinematography, with bold late summer, early autumn saturated colors that give the film a very warm, brighter than expected tone. Shot on film and presented at 2.40: aspect ratio, this is a great looking film.

The image is highly textured, with even grain, rich colors, excellent black levels, highly resolved shadow detail, and showcasing fabric, fibers, hair and skin both incredibly detailed and natural–run warm by design. The Dolby Vision (and HDR10) grading pushes the saturation of colors even deeper and provides a very noticeable increase in black levels detail at times.

Audio: 5/5

The audio is the same as the previous UHD release. Here’s what I had to say about it in my earlier review:

The Dolby Atmos audio, which works as Dolby TrueHD 7.1 for those not yet height equipped with their set up, is deliciously spare, using sound intelligently, and forcefully at times. This is Sound design that simply must be the front-runner for the Academy Award, and Marco Beltrami’s surgical use of composition is brilliant as much as when it is absent as when it is used.

Subtle sounds, shuffling around rooms, feet on sound-diffusing materials as characters walk around, breaths and other sounds we make even when we are trying to be as quiet as possible, make up a good portion of what we hear. However, when the characters make a mistake, or the creatures come into play, the sound effects wrap around us and drag us into the action. Music becomes fiercer, the sub-woofer is leaned upon heavily, fear becomes palpable and audible, and the screeches of the creatures impactful.

Special Features: 2.5/5

The UHD disc contains no special features, but three short bonus features can be found on the accompanying Blu-ray. At under 35 minutes, the number of special features is disappointing, and what is sorely missing here is a commentary track from Krasinski, who would have been fascinating to hear from as he approached the film’s intriguing premise, and his first horror film. The brief extra on the sound editing is interesting but lacks the kind of depth that would have really examined this film’s strengths and originality.

If one considers the steelbook art an extra, the score would be higher (as the artwork is very nice, inside and out).

  • Creating the Quiet–Behind the Scenes of A Quiet Place
  • The Sound of Darkness–Editing Sound for A Quiet Place
  • A Reason for Silence–The Visual Effects of A Quiet Place

Blu-ray version of the film

Digital Code

Overall: 4.5/5

A Quiet Place is a serious, dramatically thrilling film that doesn’t disappoint. It quickly establishes its world, its rules, and the stakes, and carries the audience through a riveting and wholly original experience. This is a rare combination of unrelenting dramatic thrills and an intimate and well-crafted film. Original, beautifully made and performed, with a fascinating central premise and an emotionally resonant focus on family and parenting, A Quiet Place was one of the best films I’d seen in several years, and the sequel due out this Spring, looks very promising. Paramount’s rerelease with steelbook packaging and artwork by Mondo is only for those that simply must have this art or have yet to snag this great looking 4k version of this film.

https://smile.amazon.com/Quiet-Place-4K-Blu-ray/dp/B083W4DHGM/ref=tmm_frk_title_1?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

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Neil Middlemiss

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noel aguirre

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Thanks for the review and Its great movie but nothing new here offered so not understanding how that warrants another review? And I much prefer the Best Buy steelbook artwork with its striking debossed scratches. But thanks nonetheless!
 

Johnny Angell

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Thanks for the review and Its great movie but nothing new here offered so not understanding how that warrants another review? And I much prefer the Best Buy steelbook artwork with its striking debossed scratches. But thanks nonetheless!
I thought Amazon’s and BB’s were the same steelbook.
 

noel aguirre

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I thought Amazon’s and BB’s were the same steelbook.
While BB will also be selling this particular steelbook BB originally sold an exclusive BB steelbook when AQP was first released which is what I am referring to.
 
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Johnny Angell

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While BB will also be selling this particular steelbook BB originally sold an exclusive BB steelbook when AQP was first released which is what I am referring to.
The artwork on this makes me wish I didn’t already own the movie.
 
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Mike Frezon

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The word "Mondo" was really throwing me off with this release.

Originally, I thought it was just being generally descriptive of the release--such as that it would probably include comprehensive bonus features on the making of the film, etc.

Then, when I saw Neil's review, it became obvious that "Mondo" is the company responsible for the steelbook artwork.

Yeah...I'll be sticking with my standard 4k purchase. I really enjoyed this film and hope the sequel matches up.
 

Johnny Angell

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Both steel books look great, but I like the Mondo version the best.