Yet another magnificent presentation from Warner Archive, that needs to be in every serious collection.

WarnerColor was a process ill-used in many occasions, for which it’s received a bad reputation. Based upon the generic Eastman taking stock of the era, 5248, it was printed single strand to standard positive stock, or occasionally via Technicolor matrices, in dye transfer, and in some cases that was its undoing.

If there’s a poster child, it would be Giant!, the negative of which was so inappropriately cut and conformed as to render the original elements baked full of horrific dupes. Printer functions, rather than being short cut to a couple of frames either side of function, ran full length from the A to B side of the effects – in some cases over 100 feet. Giant was originally printed direct positive Eastman, with a dye transfer (same situation as Rear Window) re-issue.

Two things come into play toward making Warner Archive’s new Blu-ray of The Pajama Game, one of the wonderful ’50s musicals, based upon the Broadway play, and in turn the novel 7 1/2 cents by Marian Bissell, and they may be of equal importance.

First, printer functions are short cut, meaning that dupes run for only the actual length of the function, and second, the fact that we can now replicate in a non-analogue form, which would have used filters, lights, exposures and printing stock.

To coin a word, let’s call it “Prestidigitalization,” or in layman’s terms a renewed magical life, based upon our newest digital toolset.

A scan of the original Eastman negative, with dupes intact, has given us a remarkable look at what Harry Stradling’s negative holds, which may actually reproduce better than it did on 1957 release printing stock.

Colors pop off the screen in astonishing fashion, with any negative attributes of fade essentially hidden by a deft hand in color, beautifully balancing any problems, without causing anything problematic.

With many original Broadway players in their original roles (same situation with Damn Yankees) the film just works, and spins its tale with all twelve cylinders running smoothly – the team of George Abbott and Stanley Donen working their magic.

Yet another magnificent presentation from Warner Archive, that needs to be in every serious collection.

Image – 5

Audio – 5

Pass / Fail – Pass

Upgrade from DVD – Yup

Very Highly Recommended

RAH

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Will Krupp

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ssssss-steam heat

Everybody has their favorite moments from movies and a lot of times they don't make much sense to anyone but the person holding the memory. My (bizarrely) favorite moment in the whole thing is during "I Don't Wanna Talk Small Talk" when Doris Day, holding the newspaper, sings "WHADdaya THINK they CHARGE for FRUIT now?" I don't know why but it makes me smile every single time.
 

Garysb

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Every time these great releases of classic films come out I think what a shame that most of the people who made the film aren't here to see what has been done to their movies. That is especially true of Doris Day with all these films of hers coming out in pristine condition.
 

PMF

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Thrilled about this 5/5 score for The Pajama Game.

Like the rest of us, I’m a huge fan of all involved in this classic musical; but this film is also the work of DP Harry Stradling, so a score of 5/5 only serves further to intensify my anticipations.

Indeed, when it comes to musicals on celluloid and the artistry of Mr. Stradling’s eye, look no further:

Easter Parade (1948)
Words and Music (1948)
The Pirate (1948)
The Barkley’s of Broadway (1949)
In the Good Old Summertime (1949)
Hans Christian Anderson (1952)
Guys and Dolls (1955)
The Eddie Duchin Story (1956)
The Pajama Game (1957)
Gypsy (1962)
My Fair Lady (1964)
Funny Girl (1968)
Hello, Dolly! (1969)
On a Clear Day You Can See Forever (1970)

The Pajama Game could not have come at a better time. Many thanks to WAC and George Feltenstein.:thumbs-up-smiley:
 
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Mark B

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Everybody has their favorite moments from movies and a lot of times they don't make much sense to anyone but the person holding the memory. My (bizarrely) favorite moment in the whole thing is during "I Don't Wanna Talk Small Talk" when Doris Day, holding the newspaper, sings "WHADdaya THINK they CHARGE for FRUIT now?" I don't know why but it makes me smile every single time.
The Broadway lyric was
"What do you think they charge for ham now?"

to rhyme with

"Got so a buck ain't worth a damn now"

For the film it was changed to fruit and hoot.
 

AnthonyClarke

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Typical nonsensical change. Fortunate that it flies past us in a flash, hidden in the overall brilliance of this musical.
I get a kick every time from the dead-pan intro to 'Steam Heat'. There are so many little gems in this movie. I'm so happy that John Raitt (Bonnie's dad) got the gig. After watching 'Pajama Game' on DVD, I always switch discs and watch him doing the park bench scene in 'Carousel' .... so affecting.
 

Richard Kaufman

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Saw the first Broadway revival in 1973 with Barbara McNair, Hal Linden , and Cab Calloway. So good I went twice. Reviews at the time said it was better than the first production.
 
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B-ROLL

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The Broadway lyric was
"What do you think they charge for ham now?"

to rhyme with

"Got so a buck ain't worth a damn now"

For the film it was changed to fruit and hoot.
I believe the lyrics on Broadway weren't originally "7 and a half cents doesn't mean a heck of a lot!"

But what the hay :D!
Only Clark Gable was allowed to say "damn".
I understand both he and the studio were fined for that ...
 

lark144

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I believe the lyrics on Broadway weren't originally "7 and a half cents doesn't mean a heck of a lot!"

But what the hay :D!

I understand both he and the studio were fined for that ...
Though I may be mistaken, I read somewhere that because this particular "damn" was from a famous literary source that millions of readers expected to hear, David O. Selznick managed to get the Hays office to rescind their language restriction.
 

PMF

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Though I may be mistaken, I read somewhere that because this particular "damn" was from a famous literary source that millions of readers expected to hear, David O. Selznick managed to get the Hays office to rescind their language restriction.
If memory is serving me correctly; and sourced from my decades-old readings of GWTW histories; there was a $5,000 fine or price-tag that was attached to the agreement.
 
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