Still a fun show after all these years.
The Blues Brothers, John Landis’ now forty year-old paean to the blues, overkill and music, has always reminded me of the Ray & Irwin’s garage sequence from Mad World.

Actually shot in Vancouver, dressed as Chicago, saved billions of dollars in the various scenes of destruction, merriment and mirth. In 1980 the average police cruiser probably came in at about $5,000, while in Canadian funds, closer to $800.

While certain sequences stand out to me today, such as Cab Callaway’s Minnie the Moocher, four decades, and a myriad of home video releases later, it seems a bit more episodic that it may have originally, but it’s still odd fun.

The initial home release was in the Kodak Show at Home format, followed decades later by several laser disc variants, VHS, Beta, DVD, Blu-ray, and now 4k. It may have made it to CED, but I don’t recall.

There are occasional shots that can make use of the increased bandwidth, but generally, from a nominal seating distance, the 4k looks very much akin to Blu-ray albeit with an application of HDR. It is noted that there are a number of instances of a lack of shadow detail, possible black crush from the HDR, but those shots may have always been that way, as photographed. I don’t have the impetus to go back and research.

Before anyone asks if it’s worth the upgrade, the answer is “yes,” for the audio alone, which is now in DTS-X.

Still a fun show after all these years.

Image – 5

Audio – 5 (DTS-X)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Upgrade from Blu-ray – at a minimum, for the Audio

Recommended

RAH
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Robert Harris

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Ken Koc

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I always watch the extended version which I have become used to watching. See the theatrical version in 4K , I'll be feeling I'm watching a cut version. Gladiator and Alien are also examples of this.
 

ScottJH

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I always watch the extended version which I have become used to watching. See the theatrical version in 4K , I'll be feeling I'm watching a cut version. Gladiator and Alien are also examples of this.

Both cuts are on the 4k disc.
 

Brian Husar

Second Unit
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Messages
462
The Blues Brothers, John Landis' now forty year-old paean to the blues, overkill and music, has always reminded me of the Ray & Irwin's garage sequence from Mad World.

Actually shot in Vancouver, dressed as Chicago, saved billions of dollars in the various scenes of destruction, merriment and mirth. In 1980 the average police cruiser probably came in at about $5,000, while in Canadian funds, closer to $800.

While certain sequences stand out to me today, such as Cab Callaway's Minnie the Moocher, four decades, and a myriad of home video releases later, it seems a bit more episodic that it may have originally, but it's still odd fun.

The initial home release was in the Kodak Show at Home format, followed decades later by several laser disc variants, VHS, Beta, DVD, Blu-ray, and now 4k. It may have made it to CED, but I don't recall.

There are occasional shots that can make use of the increased bandwidth, but generally, from a nominal seating distance, the 4k looks very much akin to Blu-ray albeit with an application of HDR. It is noted that there are a number of instances of a lack of shadow detail, possible black crush from the HDR, but those shots may have always been that way, as photographed. I don't have the impetus to go back and research.

Before anyone asks if it's worth the upgrade, the answer is "yes," for the audio alone, which is now in DTS-X.

Still a fun show after all these years.

Image – 5

Audio – 5 (DTS-X)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Upgrade from Blu-ray - at a minimum, for the Audio

Recommended

RAH
Not so sure about Vancouver as I was a little kid in Chicago when they were filming this. Blues Brothers 2000 was filmed in Vancouver though. I remember clearly that Mayor Jane Byrne gave the carte blanche to do what they wanted, especially at Daily Center and that is Daily Center in the film.
 

Worth

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Not so sure about Vancouver as I was a little kid in Chicago when they were filming this. Blues Brothers 2000 was filmed in Vancouver though. I remember clearly that Mayor Jane Byrne gave the carte blanche to do what they wanted, especially at Daily Center and that is Daily Center in the film.
I think RAH is indulging in some dry humour there. Blues Brothers 2000 was shot mostly in and around Toronto.
 
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maxfabien

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Aug 27, 2019
Messages
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Walter
The Blues Brothers, John Landis' now forty year-old paean to the blues, overkill and music, has always reminded me of the Ray & Irwin's garage sequence from Mad World.

Actually shot in Vancouver, dressed as Chicago, saved billions of dollars in the various scenes of destruction, merriment and mirth. In 1980 the average police cruiser probably came in at about $5,000, while in Canadian funds, closer to $800.

While certain sequences stand out to me today, such as Cab Callaway's Minnie the Moocher, four decades, and a myriad of home video releases later, it seems a bit more episodic that it may have originally, but it's still odd fun.

The initial home release was in the Kodak Show at Home format, followed decades later by several laser disc variants, VHS, Beta, DVD, Blu-ray, and now 4k. It may have made it to CED, but I don't recall.

There are occasional shots that can make use of the increased bandwidth, but generally, from a nominal seating distance, the 4k looks very much akin to Blu-ray albeit with an application of HDR. It is noted that there are a number of instances of a lack of shadow detail, possible black crush from the HDR, but those shots may have always been that way, as photographed. I don't have the impetus to go back and research.

Before anyone asks if it's worth the upgrade, the answer is "yes," for the audio alone, which is now in DTS-X.

Still a fun show after all these years.

Image – 5

Audio – 5 (DTS-X)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Upgrade from Blu-ray - at a minimum, for the Audio

Recommended

RAH
Some scenes for The Blues Brothers were filmed in Los Angeles (the ballroom was actually the Hollywood Palladium). But the majority was definitely filmed in and around Chicago!!!! So many recognizable locations. I lived near the Dixie Square Shopping Mall that they drove through. Wrigley Field, the Daley Center, Joliet Correctional Center, lower Wacker Drive with the police car massacre, several other lesser known locations. Mayor Jane Byrne gave whole-hearted approval to film all over the city.
 

Robert Crawford

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Some scenes for The Blues Brothers were filmed in Los Angeles (the ballroom was actually the Hollywood Palladium). But the majority was definitely filmed in and around Chicago!!!! So many recognizable locations. I lived near the Dixie Square Shopping Mall that they drove through. Wrigley Field, the Daley Center, Joliet Correctional Center, lower Wacker Drive with the police car massacre, several other lesser known locations. Mayor Jane Byrne gave whole-hearted approval to film all over the city.
RAH dry humor strikes again!;) He knows much of the movie was filmed around Chicago.
 
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scaryjoe

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joe schkeryantz
The Blues Brothers, John Landis' now forty year-old paean to the blues, overkill and music, has always reminded me of the Ray & Irwin's garage sequence from Mad World.

Actually shot in Vancouver, dressed as Chicago, saved billions of dollars in the various scenes of destruction, merriment and mirth. In 1980 the average police cruiser probably came in at about $5,000, while in Canadian funds, closer to $800.

While certain sequences stand out to me today, such as Cab Callaway's Minnie the Moocher, four decades, and a myriad of home video releases later, it seems a bit more episodic that it may have originally, but it's still odd fun.

The initial home release was in the Kodak Show at Home format, followed decades later by several laser disc variants, VHS, Beta, DVD, Blu-ray, and now 4k. It may have made it to CED, but I don't recall.

There are occasional shots that can make use of the increased bandwidth, but generally, from a nominal seating distance, the 4k looks very much akin to Blu-ray albeit with an application of HDR. It is noted that there are a number of instances of a lack of shadow detail, possible black crush from the HDR, but those shots may have always been that way, as photographed. I don't have the impetus to go back and research.

Before anyone asks if it's worth the upgrade, the answer is "yes," for the audio alone, which is now in DTS-X.

Still a fun show after all these years.

Image – 5

Audio – 5 (DTS-X)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Upgrade from Blu-ray - at a minimum, for the Audio

Recommended

RAH
This was shot in Chicago and milwaukee, I know because I watched them shoot the milwaukee seen, and I know people who worked on the Chicago shoots.
that is the car going off the bridge. So I Am not sure where you get your info from.
 

Robert Crawford

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This was shot in Chicago and milwaukee, I know because I watched them shoot the milwaukee seen, and I know people who worked on the Chicago shoots.
that is the car going off the bridge. So I Am not sure where you get your info from.
Victim #3! :D
 
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