Those who love fine cinema can finally marvel at the words, the directing and the acting, in a far more appealing manner than in recent years. 4 Stars

There was a time, as a late teen, before I learned to speak fillum, that I might confuse, or conjoin George Cukor’s wonderful 1938 romantic comedy Holiday, with Leo McCarey’s wonderful The Awful Truth, produced the year previous.

Both star Cary Grant, while Awful feature him with Irene Dunn, while Holiday, Katharine Hepburn and Doris Nolan.

For those unaware of either, or both, you’ve a treat in store.

Because finally, we have both on Blu-ray.

Both are Columbia productions, and neither has been seen in prime condition for many years.

While Holiday looks like film, grain haters need not apply, as the majority of the image is derived from a nitrate duplicate neg, presumably in turn, derived from a nitrate lavender.

Most viewers won’t notice the digital cleanup, as the film look remains, but elements appear to have been in less than stellar condition.

Work performed is of the highest caliber.

Audio is lively and clean.

Criterion has included the 1930 version of the film, also based upon the Barry stage play, and it fairs a bit better than the main feature.

But, those who love fine cinema can finally marvel at the words, the directing and the acting, in a far more appealing manner than in recent years.

An extraordinary film.

Image – 4.25

Audio – 5

Pass / Fail – Pass

Very Highly Recommended

RAH

Published by

Robert Harris

editor,member

Robin9

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2006
Messages
5,565
Real Name
Robin
I am a grain hater but I'll be buying this disc because the film is a favorite of mine and I anyway accept that film grain "goes with the territory" when you're talking about late 1930s movies.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67 and B-ROLL

Rob W

Supporting Actor
Joined
May 23, 1999
Messages
862
Real Name
Robert
I read somewhere once that studio chief Harry Cohn was notoriously cheap and Columbia made their release prints from the original negatives rather than creating duplicate negatives , which was the norm. No idea if it's true, but it certainly would explain why so much of the Columbia library has needed work.
 
Last edited:

Michel_Hafner

Screenwriter
Joined
Feb 28, 2002
Messages
1,303
I am a grain hater but I'll be buying this disc because the film is a favorite of mine and I anyway accept that film grain "goes with the territory" when you're talking about late 1930s movies.
Film grain goes with the territory in any decade.
 
  • Like
Reactions: plektret

roxy1927

Second Unit
Joined
Jul 10, 2018
Messages
258
Real Name
vincent parisi
As I have written probably on another thread I have seen Holiday a number of times in different revival houses and on TV. It is one of my favorite films especially because of the performances of Lew Ayres and Jean Dixon and I think it might be Cukor's best film. But I have never seen a good print. The grain has always been bad as if the 35mm prints had been transferred from 16mm. And the prints have shown a fair amount of fading. So I do wonder if there is going to be any real difference.
 

David Weicker

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2005
Messages
3,593
Real Name
David
Received my copy today.

The ‘38 version looks good, and is one of my favorite films. Such joy and chemistry. Plus “the Witch and Dopey”. We like it

The ‘30 version looks fantastic. Ann Harding is terrific. And it has Horton’s “bottle speech”, which is a joy. I’d only seen a horrible YouTube version before now.

A wonderful Criterion package.
 
Last edited:

bujaki

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2012
Messages
4,825
Location
Richardson, TX
Real Name
Jose Ortiz-Marrero
Received my copy today.

The ‘38 version looks good, and is one of my favorite films. Such joy and chemistry. Plus “the Witch and Dopey”. We like it

The ‘30 version looks fantastic. Ann Harding is terrific. And it has Horton’s “bottle speech”, which is a joy. I’d only seen a horrible YouTube version before now.

A wonderful Criterion package.
Ann Harding and Mary Astor are both terrific and give the film some lift. So does Horton. I really like the '30 version...if only it had Lew Ayres...
 

Mark Mayes

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Mar 14, 2004
Messages
173
Location
West Hollywood
Real Name
Mark Mayes
I had never seen the Ann Harding version until I got this disc last night. I am starting to prefer it. The male stars are not as good, but Harding delivers a coherent performance that I wasn't expecting.
 

bujaki

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2012
Messages
4,825
Location
Richardson, TX
Real Name
Jose Ortiz-Marrero
I had never seen the Ann Harding version until I got this disc last night. I am starting to prefer it. The male stars are not as good, but Harding delivers a coherent performance that I wasn't expecting.
Yes, yes, yes! I can't say it enough. Harding is so much better. And Astor as well. I can't even remember the sister in the remake.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mark Mayes

Will Krupp

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2003
Messages
2,764
Location
PA
Real Name
Will
Harding delivers a coherent performance that I wasn't expecting.
Yes, yes, yes! I can't say it enough. Harding is so much better. And Astor as well. I can't even remember the sister in the remake.
You know, I love Hepburn, but I can't help but agree with you. Harding is so natural and less theatrical than Hepburn there really isn't a comparison. (Heaven help me for saying so!)

Linda's "farewell" speech to her family reeks of artifice at the BEST of it (it's a Philip Barry clunker, IMO) but Harding ALMOST makes you believe it, while Hepburn seems to be pitching it to a matinee balcony. It's always bothered me that, again, as much as I love Hepburn, most of her lines were just that, lines she was reciting (sometimes shouting for no fathomable reason.) Now I see what it SHOULD look like and I found myself actually ROOTING for Linda (even though I already knew the ending!)

Nice to have both versions and I still DO enjoy the 1938 (though it's crazy that the 1930 looks better and fresher)

Lovely disc to have!