It was for that reason that I wasn't terribly concerned about the minor problems that might appear in the transfers of these films, but I came away very pleasantly surprised at their overall quality. 4 Stars

I always consider these types of releases as special gifts when Kino drops them on us.

And these two, a single disc release of Murder (1930), along with five of his BIP (British International Pictures) titles, The Ring (1927), The Farmer’s Wife (1928), Champagne (1928), The Manxman (1929), and The Skin Game (1931), fill in some important blanks in cinephile’s Hitchcock libraries.

If the public is true to form, I’d bet that the majority think of Sir Alfred’s career beginning somewhere in the mid-1950s, while those more informed may be aware of the Gaumont and Gainsborough pictures from the 1930s.

But it’s in films such as these, that the astute wanderer of the cinematic plains, can begin to find the bits and pieces of the art that will come together with classics arriving three decades hence.

It was for that reason that I wasn’t terribly concerned about the minor problems that might appear in the transfers of these films, but I came away very pleasantly surprised at their overall quality.

For the record the four earlier films are silent, with scores attached, while the latter two are early sound.

For those who may be stopped in their purchase in fear of quality, here’s the breakdown:

The Ring

Image – 3.25

Audio – n/a

Pass / Fail – Pass

The Farmer’s Wife

Image – 3.75

Audio – n/a

Pass / Fail – Pass

Champagne

Image – 3.25

Audio – n/a

Pass / Fail – Pass

The Manxman

Image – 5

Audio – n/a

Pass / Fail – Pass

The Skin Game

Image – 3.25

Audio – 3.75

Pass / Fail – Pass

Murder

Image – 3.5

Audio – 3.75

Pass / Fail – Pass

Highly Recommended

RAH

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Published by

Robert Harris

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Nelson Au

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I just saw all these titles earlier this year in poor quality discs. So I’m curious to revisit them on these newly made discs. I’ll be curious I end up liking some of the titles better.
 

Mark-P

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I just watched Kino's Blu-ray of "Murder!" Here is the perfect example of why the correct masking should be used for an early talkie with a 1.19:1 aspect ratio and not "open-matte" 1.33:1 which this presentation is.

Left side crew equipment visible:
Murder1.jpg



Left side edge of set visible (this is supposed to be a small enclosed prison visiting/interrogation room):
Murder2.jpg
 

Robert Harris

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I just watched Kino's Blu-ray of "Murder!" Here is the perfect example of why the correct masking should be used for an early talkie with a 1.19:1 aspect ratio and not "open-matte" 1.33:1 which this presentation is.

Left side crew equipment visible:
View attachment 69267


Left side edge of set visible (this is supposed to be a small enclosed prison visiting/interrogation room):
View attachment 69268

Agreed. Quite correct.
 

Gary16

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I just watched Kino's Blu-ray of "Murder!" Here is the perfect example of why the correct masking should be used for an early talkie with a 1.19:1 aspect ratio and not "open-matte" 1.33:1 which this presentation is.

Left side crew equipment visible:
View attachment 69267


Left side edge of set visible (this is supposed to be a small enclosed prison visiting/interrogation room):
View attachment 69268
Has this been reported to Kino? They should fix it.
 

Mark-P

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Mark Probst
Has this been reported to Kino? They should fix it.

I’ll ask.

As an aside, seeing the matte open, can be quite educational. Some filmmakers protected, while some did not. Hitchcock and De Mille are among them.
Honestly I only posted the images for educational purposes. I didn't want people to pile on to Kino, as they tend not to respond well to criticism. It's really a minor issue, as those were the only two shots I even noticed that had things revealed that you weren't supposed to see. I think the next time I watch the movie, I will use my projector's blanking feature to mask about 140 pixels on the left side of the image.