Otto Preminger’s 1959 courtroom drama, Anatomy of a Murder, has been released in Columbia’s second collection of films from their library in 4k UHD.



For those who may have not been around when it ran theatrically, it’s a brilliant film that beautifully stands the test of time.

With an image capture from the original negative, and a new track adapted to stereo and Dolby Atmos (there’s also a mono track), it’s a wonderful representation of mid-20th century filmmaking, seen in the highest quality for modern home theater presentation.

There’s an age-old question here. Repeated for generations since the time of the Bible.

How well do older films translate to 4k UHD (with or without HDR), and is it necessary?

My personal feeling is that for most people, it isn’t.

But for cinephiles who seek the last bit of pictorial resolution, even whilst seated at a normal distance from a screen, especially via projection, there’s definitely a positive attribute even if visceral, but it’s there, and I applaud it.

For those not into projected images, a new Blu-ray based upon the same master would absolutely suffice.

One of the problems of frame grabs that we see on some sites compare a new 4k vs an older Blu-ray, which tells us nothing. The important point here, is that one must compare vs a new Blu-ray from the same master.

Picture – 5

Audio – 5

Pass / Fail – Pass

Plays nicely with projectors – Yes

Makes use of and works well in 4k – 3.5

Highly Recommended



RAH
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Robert Harris

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Robert Crawford

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I respectively disagree with RAH as I thought "Anatomy of a Murder" looked beautiful in 4K/Dolby Vision as I was really impressed viewing this video presentation on my 65" OLED. Going forward I will only view this movie again in that video format.
 

titch

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The important point here, is that one must compare vs a new Blu-ray from the same master.
Haven't compared the Anatomy Of A Murder UHD and blu-ray in the set but I would expect the grain to more pronounced on the UHD, compared to the blu-ray - on my projector set-up this is the most striking difference between UHDs and blu-rays from the same master. This was the case with Taxi Driver and - particularly - Sense and Sensibility, which I did compare.
 

haineshisway

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Otto Preminger's 1959 courtroom drama, Anatomy of a Murder, has been released in Columbia's second collection of films from their library in 4k UHD.

For those who may have not been around when it ran theatrically, it's a brilliant film that beautifully stands the test of time.

With an image capture from the original negative, and a new track adapted to stereo and Dolby Atmos (there's also a mono track), it's a wonderful representation of mid-20th century filmmaking, seen in the highest quality for modern home theater presentation.

There's an age-old question here. Repeated for generations since the time of the Bible.

How well do older films translate to 4k UHD (with or without HDR), and is it necessary?

My personal feeling is that for most people, it isn't.

But for cinephiles who seek the last bit of pictorial resolution, even whilst seated at a normal distance from a screen, especially via projection, there's definitely a positive attribute even if visceral, but it's there, and I applaud it.

For those not into projected images, a new Blu-ray based upon the same master would absolutely suffice.

One of the problems of frame grabs that we see on some sites compare a new 4k vs an older Blu-ray, which tells us nothing. The important point here, is that one must compare vs a new Blu-ray from the same master.


Picture - 5

Audio – 5

Pass / Fail – Pass

Plays nicely with projectors - Yes

Makes use of and works well in 4k - 3.5

Highly Recommended


RAH
Especially when the site is comparing the 4K NOT to a Criterion Blu-ray, but to a DVD. THAT'S progress, baby. I'll let you figure out which site would do that.
 

Robert Crawford

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@Robert Harris How does this 4K compare to the recent Criterion? Does the film benefit from Atmos? This is only available as part of a collection?
I'm not RAH, but as far as physical media is concern, the 4K disc is only available as part of this 4K Boxset. IMO, this 4K is significantly better looking and sounding than the 2011 Criterion Blu-ray.
 

Johnny Angell

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I'm not RAH, but as far as physical media is concern, the 4K disc is only available as part of this 4K Boxset. IMO, this 4K is significantly better looking and sounding than the 2011 Criterion Blu-ray.
Damn. I don’t have the $$ to spend on this set. What does Atmos do for an old movie like this one?
 

cda1143

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I respectively disagree with RAH as I thought "Anatomy of a Murder" looked beautiful in 4K/Dolby Vision as I was really impressed viewing this video presentation on my 65" OLED. Going forward I will only view this movie again in that video format.
Robert I'm confused about what you disagree with. RAH seems to like this 4K as much as you do.
...
With an image capture from the original negative, ..., it's a wonderful representation of mid-20th century filmmaking, seen in the highest quality for modern home theater presentation.

...But for cinephiles who seek the last bit of pictorial resolution, ..., there's definitely a positive attribute even if visceral, but it's there, and I applaud it.

For those not into projected images, a new Blu-ray based upon the same master would absolutely suffice.

Picture - 5
...Pass / Fail – Pass
...Plays nicely with projectors - Yes

...Highly Recommended

RAH
His only qualification being that for non-cinephiles, a quality blu-ray from the same master would be sufficient.

As you have stated, you find the new 4K far superior to the old Criterion Blu. I'm quite certain that's accurate. But reading between the lines of this review, I'm betting that the blu-ray from this master is also far superior to the Criterion.

However, 4K discs are a tiny niche market. As a practical matter - no one owns UHD players. For all those who do not, it's unfortunate Sony is not even releasing a Blu-ray set, let alone a stand-alone. Sony isn't doing physical media any favors by (essentially) denying the overwhelming majority of film lovers the opportunity of the blu-ray.

Nutty 4K UHD people like us may be willing to spend $114 to get UHD versions of Anatomy and Taxi Driver, and use the others as coasters*, but most film lovers won't. It's a shame they will all miss out on a great new transfer of a great film.

*I Know, I know - Oliver! is also undeniably a classic.... but c'mon - Stripes?
 

dpippel

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*I Know, I know - Oliver! is also undeniably a classic.... but c'mon - Stripes?
Personally, I'm happy for ANY catalog film that gets a 4K disc release, particularly from Sony. Even Stripes, which IMO is still a funny as hell movie. And I'm even more excited that you can buy this set for around $100 and get all six titles in 4K for $20 or less each, and in a beautiful package to boot. Sometimes I just don't understand the "film snobbery." ;)
 

Robert Crawford

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Robert I'm confused about what you disagree with. RAH seems to like this 4K as much as you do.
I disagreed with the following:

"For those not into projected images, a new Blu-ray based upon the same master would absolutely suffice."

Which is why I stated the following:

"I respectively disagree with RAH as I thought "Anatomy of a Murder" looked beautiful in 4K/Dolby Vision as I was really impressed viewing this video presentation on my 65" OLED. Going forward I will only view this movie again in that video format."
 

PaulaJ

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I'm chuffed (as our British friends say) to have 4K versions of all the films in this vol. 2 set, and that definitely goes for Stripes, too. That's required viewing around here, especially with one pal who is a retired Army officer. :)
 

noel aguirre

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As far as I’m concerned HDR is a gimmick and not filmic and rather cosmetic. Watched My Fair Lady the other night for example and while gorgeous to look at- did her jewelry ever really sparkle like that during the ball scene like I was watching QVC? It was distracting to say the least.
 

Glenn C.

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As far as I’m concerned HDR is a gimmick and not filmic and rather cosmetic. Watched My Fair Lady the other night for example and while gorgeous to look at- did her jewelry ever really sparkle like that during the ball scene like I was watching QVC? It was distracting to say the least.
If you feel that way about HDR then you can save a whole lot of money by simply not buying 4K discs.:laugh:
 

Richard Gallagher

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Although I do not have UHD, it has been confirmed to me that all of the Blu-rays in this set are derived from the new 4K scans. At about $17 apiece for six Blu-rays, this set is a bargain that I will purchase. I have the Criterion BD of Anatomy of a Murder so I will do my own comparison when I receive the box set.

As I mentioned in the Citizen Kane thread, my only gripe about the UHD/Blu-ray combo sets is that the release info never seems to specify whether the Blu-rays are new transfers or repackaged old transfers. The Amazon listing provides no specs about the Blu-rays.

I also can recommend the novel by Robert Traver (a pseudonym for a real lawyer and judge, John Voelker). Anatomy of a Murder is based upon a real murder that occurred in Michigan in 1952.
 

noel aguirre

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If you feel that way about HDR then you can save a whole lot of money by simply not buying 4K discs.:laugh:
No because I have a 4K Triluminous display.
Luv 4K- just not a fan of the applied Lipstick.
The real world and film don’t necessarily have colours looking like they’re backlit by a neon light source unless it’s commercial signage. I wish disks had an option to turn that crap off rather than the machines or make it an option in the menus- problem solved.
 

Stephen_J_H

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*I Know, I know - Oliver! is also undeniably a classic.... but c'mon - Stripes?
Stripes was shot by Bill Butler, who also shot Grease, Jaws, and lots of other films. A fine journeyman DOP. Stripes may be unremarkable, but it's not ugly, and its vintage would benefit from the HDR treatment.