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Top 10 favourite 80s films that haven't been released in Blu-ray


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#241 of 252 OFFLINE   Interlepos

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Posted June 12 2015 - 04:30 PM

Sidney Lumet's 1988 film Running On Empty, will, unless advancing age should steal my memory, always occupy it's own special corner of my

consciousness and feelings. My daughter Sarah was a couple months shy of 14 in the spring of 1989, when the 2 of us took a chance on this great little

movie, during its brief run in an old neighborhood theater, in Barberton, Ohio. I just wanted to briefly mention a scene not connected with the end or climax of the film, that most would consider a small spoiler.  (I think the scene would affect most who have heard about it anyway) So, fair warning.

The scene involves Christine Lahti's character, who has an estranged relationship with her father who she has not seen in years, having a brief meeting

with her Dad in a restaurant. The father seems angry and bitter due to the things his daughter did that make it risky for her to even be seen with him. But when his daughter gets up and leaves, having made it clear that circumstances demand that it was the last time they could ever see each other. Steven Hill, as the father, is brilliant at conveying the hard exterior of a man who's angry that his daughter deserted his life, years before, but literally, as his daughter is walking away again, can't prevent some of his love and pain from surfacing. When I saw that scene, in the spring of 1989, with my own daughter, it just tore me up. Anyway, I have a brother-in-law who insists that it's silly to ever shed a tear watching a film. This man, who's in his 70s, is a really nice guy, but when he sees his own wife, my wife, or me, having an emotional reaction to a film, after it ends, he will always say "Come on, it was only a movie!"  I like Carl very much and just think it's a shame that he never suspends disbelief enough to put himself in the place of a character onscreen. I think that it must constantly be on his mind that he is just watching people who are merely play acting in imaginary situations. No wonder Carl says that he has never seen a movie that scared him. My brother-in-law just doesn't realize, as he chuckles about those who respond to films, that those with enough imagination to have such reactions, are much richer than he.  I guess that if all of us who love movies were to lose our ability to suspend disbelief, our movie collections would become pretty worthless to us.

Finally, Interlepos, thank you for bringing up Running On Empty, which has a special resonance for me, when I remember my daughter and the time we had experiencing the film together, in that old theater, more than two and a half decades ago. 

 

Thank you for the post. I totally agree. I consider people who do connect strongly to movies to be very lucky. Not just looking at movies as an opportunity to kill 2 hours, but being able to respond to a great story, and appreciate great filmmaking. Movies, when they are done well, can be a sublime and inspiring art form.

 

I recall that scene you described from the movie, and remember it well. It's a very good movie. With superb acting, story and heart. Without having seen all his subsequent films, I believe it might be Lumet's last truly great film.



#242 of 252 OFFLINE   atfree

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Posted June 12 2015 - 06:35 PM

Thank you for the post. I totally agree. I consider people who do connect strongly to movies to be very lucky. Not just looking at movies as an opportunity to kill 2 hours, but being able to respond to a great story, and appreciate great filmmaking. Movies, when they are done well, can be a sublime and inspiring art form.

I recall that scene you described from the movie, and remember it well. It's a very good movie. With superb acting, story and heart. Without having seen all his subsequent films, I believe it might be Lumet's last truly great film.

While "Running on Empty" is a fine film, IMO "The Verdict" was Lumet's last great film.

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#243 of 252 OFFLINE   RMajidi

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Posted June 13 2015 - 03:48 AM

While "Running on Empty" is a fine film, IMO "The Verdict" was Lumet's last great film.


I love and own many Lumet films on Blu-ray and DVD, with a particular connection to The Verdict and 12 Angry Men. Strange then that I've never seen Running On Empty in all this time. After Mike's description, I plan to remedy this.

#244 of 252 OFFLINE   Mike Boone

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Posted June 13 2015 - 09:19 AM

While "Running on Empty" is a fine film, IMO "The Verdict" was Lumet's last great film.

 

Have not seen The Verdict since my one viewing of it when it was in theaters, but I certainly liked it very much. I remember discussing the film with

a woman at work who was extremely disappointed that Paul Newman didn't nab an Oscar for his performance. At least, though, no one could call 

that robbery, because the award went to Ben Kingsley for totally, and convincingly, carrying the film of Gandhi. However, IMO,  one of the other

actors nominated that year, Peter O'Toole, had been genuinely robbed of an Oscar 20 years earlier. Mr O'Toole, I think, without a doubt, gave the most

astounding lead performance of 1962 playing the role of T.E. Lawrence in the film named for the man. The Academy Awards always have an element of Hollywood internal politics involved with them, and Gregory Peck being very popular among the Hollywood establishment for being a genuinely nice guy, certainly was one factor that won him some votes. But with African Americans, at the time, struggling, and sometimes dying, for basic rights like voting, Gregory Peck playing a courageous lawyer who also struggles to save the life of an innocent, but ultimately doomed, black man, was the exact sort of role that people felt almost morally obligated to recognize. Certainly, I think To Kill A Mockingbird is a beautiful film, but I honestly believe that many Academy members were voting more to recognize the upstanding nobility of Atticus Finch, than for Mr Peck's efforts in portraying him. To me it's surprising, but maybe a form of political correctness, that in no discussion I have ever seen among actors or directors, has anyone mentioned how much more emotionally difficult it was for Peter O'Toole to create the role of Lawrence, than it was for Gregory Peck to portray Atticus Finch. I cannot help but think that if Gregory Peck's 1962 Oscar nomination had been for playing the prosecutor of an innocent man, instead of his defender, then no matter how powerful a performance Mr Peck might have managed to deliver in that role, it certainly wouldn't have brought him an Oscar.


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#245 of 252 OFFLINE   RMajidi

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Posted June 14 2015 - 01:44 AM

Mike, I agree that current trends and sentiments can play their part in the Oscars. Interesting idea you posed re whether Gregory Peck would have won that year had he portrayed (with equal excellence) the role of a less sympathetic lawyer. I'd say you're probably right that he wouldn't, although as you also pointed out, there was such a wave of loving goodwill towards Mr Peck the man, that it might have secured him the Oscar anyway.

For mine, I think Gregory Peck and Peter O'Toole both delivered unforgettable performances and I can't imagine anyone else playing those defining, iconic roles.

Similarly, while I think Ben Kingsley fully deserved his Oscar for Gandhi, I would have been very comfortable had it gone to Paul Newman that year instead. Both were astonishing performances. Mr Newman finally received an Oscar for his solid turn in Color of Money, which for me was far lesser than his performance in The Verdict and not even among his top ten performances.

I've not upgraded my DVD of The Verdict to Blu-ray as all the reviews I've read panned it as a shamefully flawed release, undeserving of this significant film.

#246 of 252 OFFLINE   Mike Boone

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Posted June 14 2015 - 06:59 AM

Mike, I agree that current trends and sentiments can play their part in the Oscars. Interesting idea you posed re whether Gregory Peck would have won that year had he portrayed (with equal excellence) the role of a less sympathetic lawyer. I'd say you're probably right that he wouldn't, although as you also pointed out, there was such a wave of loving goodwill towards Mr Peck the man, that it might have secured him the Oscar anyway.

For mine, I think Gregory Peck and Peter O'Toole both delivered unforgettable performances and I can't imagine anyone else playing those defining, iconic roles.

Similarly, while I think Ben Kingsley fully deserved his Oscar for Gandhi, I would have been very comfortable had it gone to Paul Newman that year instead. Both were astonishing performances. Mr Newman finally received an Oscar for his solid turn in Color of Money, which for me was far lesser than his performance in The Verdict and not even among his top ten performances.

I've not upgraded my DVD of The Verdict to Blu-ray as all the reviews I've read panned it as a shamefully flawed release, undeserving of this significant film.

 

Ramin, I very much appreciate your comments, and also the fact that you just saved me some disappointment (and some $, as well) by pointing out that

The Verdict's transfer to Blu-ray is not a good example of the medium. Ever since atfree's mention of The Verdict, the other day, reminded me that I have

neither seen the film since its theatrical presentation, nor own the film, on either Blu-ray or DVD, the thought of just going on Amazon and ordering the blu had been floating around in my mind. Am glad now for not having pulled that thought into shore. Think now that I'll just check into ordering the DVD.

 

Anyway, thanks again Ramin, and Cheers To You & Yours In Australia.


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#247 of 252 OFFLINE   Kyrsten Brad

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Posted July 11 2015 - 04:01 PM

An Update on my 80s Listings for Blu:

Maximum Overdrive (1986): Consideried ordering the DVD as a placeholder, then saw it was fullscreen. Waiting for better.
Foxes (1980):
Xanadu (1980):
Dr. Detroit (1983):
Ghostbusters II (1989)
Star 80 (1983)
Personal Best (1982)
Valley Girl (1983): A companion movie The Sure Thing (1985) is out on Blu. Hoping this one follows soon
Big Bad Mama II (1987): We're seeing more & more Roger Corman out on Blu. Hoping this follows soon.
Trading Places (1984):
Prom Night (1980):
Chopping Mall (1986): Again more Roger Corman coming out. Hoping for this too.
Last Married Couple in America (1980): well we're seeing more Richard Benjamin recently (How To Beat The High Cost of Living, Love At First BIte).
Blame It On Rio (1983)
Tootsie (1982)
Private School (1983):
Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982)
Coming to America (1988)

Added Since:

Little Darlings (1980)
Foxes (1980)
Looker (1981)
Ghost Story (1981)
Endless Love (1981 Brooke Shields version)
Summer Lovers (1982)
The Pirates of Penzance (1983)
Supergirl (1984)
Teachers (1984)
Cloak & Dagger (1984)
Runaway (1984)
The Wild Life (1984)
Spacecamp (1986)
The Parent Trap II (1986)

Light Of Day (1987)
Working Girl (1988)

Well folks, celebration time.  Ghost Story (1981) comes off the list as Scream Factory has announced they will be releasing this film on Blu-ray come this Fall.  Exact date hasn't been determined yet but "she (Alice Krige in a early role for us Star Trek fans) is coming for....Fred Astaire.

 

ghost_story_poster_01.jpg



#248 of 252 OFFLINE   PatrickDA

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Posted July 13 2015 - 01:45 AM

"The Year of Living Dangerously"



#249 of 252 OFFLINE   Reggie W

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Posted July 13 2015 - 08:53 AM

Year of the Dragon.jpg

 

Prince of the City.jpg



#250 of 252 OFFLINE   Reggie W

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Posted July 13 2015 - 08:57 AM

after dark my sweet.jpg

 

drugstore cowboy.jpg



#251 of 252 OFFLINE   Kyrsten Brad

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Posted July 24 2015 - 09:28 AM

I'm sure this one was mentioned somewhere in this thread but Celebration, off this list it comes:

 

The World According To Garp (1982)

 

WorldAccordingToGarp_Blu.jpg



#252 of 252 OFFLINE   Konstantinos

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Posted July 24 2015 - 01:26 PM

I really hope they don't miss the opportunity for a 30th anniversary of:

Explorers

Asterix versus Caesar would be great too with English subtitles (it's been released in Europe without them)

King Solomon's Mines

One Magic Christmas (this could be a Disney Club exclusive)

Starchaser: Legend of Orin

Young Serlock Holmes

 

Normally I'd ask for Black Cauldron too, but since I don't like how Disney is treating on Bluray their animation classics, I don't.






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