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WHV Press Release: WBHE & TCM Add Double Features to TCM Greatest Classic Films

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#1 of 7 OFFLINE   Ronald Epstein

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Posted February 26 2014 - 06:02 AM

New from Turner Classic Movies and

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

APRIL 29

 

 

Double Feature Packs Include Movies Starring

Bogart & Bacall, Elizabeth Taylor, Elvis Presley,

Doris Day, Frank Sinatra and John Wayne 

 

Plus Musicals, Stars & Stripes Comedies,

World War II Dramas and Alfred Hitchcock Thrillers

 

TWO GREAT CLASSICS FOR ONE GREAT PRICE

 

BURBANK, Calif., February 26, 2014 – Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Inc. (WBHE) and Turner Classic Movies (TCM) have added Double Features to their TCM Greatest Classic Films line, which spotlights Hollywood’s most legendary actors and actresses in classic cinema. Available April 29, the newest additions are: TCM Greatest Classic Films: Musicals Double Feature,

TCM Greatest Classic Films: Bogart & Bacall Double Feature, TCM Greatest Classic Films: Elizabeth Taylor Double Features, TCM Greatest Classic Films: Elvis Presley Double Feature,

TCM Greatest Classic Films: Doris Day Double Features, TCM Greatest Classic Films: Stars & Stripes Comedy Double Feature, TCM Greatest Classic Films: WWII Double Feature, TCM Greatest Classic Films: Frank Sinatra Double Feature, TCM Greatest Classic Films: John Wayne Double Feature and TCM Greatest Classic Films: Alfred Hitchcock Double Feature.

 

Each DVD collection featuring two classic films is affordably priced at $12.97 SRP.

 

 

ABOUT THE COLLECTIONS

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: MUSICALS DOUBLE FEATURE

 

Calamity Jane (1953) – Doris Day and Howard Keel fuss, feud and fall in love as Calamity Jane and Wild Bill Hickok in this entertainment mother lode from director David Butler and screenwriter James O’Hanlon.

 

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) – Things are different for the Pontipee men now that big brother Adam’s fetched a bride and brought her to their cabin. Indeed, the unwed brothers are so inspired that they raid the town and carry off brides of their own!

 

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: BOGART & BACALL DOUBLE FEATURE

 

The Big Sleep (1946) – L.A. private eye Philip Marlowe (Humphrey Bogart) takes on a blackmail case… and follows a trail peopled with murderers, pornographers, nightclub rogues, the spoiled rich and more. Raymond Chandler’s legendary gumshoe solves it in hard-boiled style. Director Howard Hawks stylishly serves up snappy character encounters (particularly those of Bogart and Lauren Bacall), brisk pace and atmosphere galore from a script by William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett and Jules Furthman.

 

Key Largo (1948) – A hurricane swirls outside, but it’s nothing compared to the storm within the hotel at Key Largo. There sadistic mobster Johnny Rocco (Edward G. Robinson) holes up  - and holds at gunpoint hotel owner Nora Temple (Lauren Bacall), her invalid father-in-law (Lionel Barrymore) and ex-GI Frank McCloud (Humphrey Bogart). John Huston directs.

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: ELIZABETH TAYLOR DOUBLE FEATURES

 

Butterfield 8/Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Butterfield 8 (1960) – Elizabeth Taylor won her first Best Actress Academy Award® (1960) as the call girl whose life comes with a complete set of emotional baggage in this film directed by Daniel Mann and written by Charles Schnee and John Michael Hayes. Laurence Harvey and Eddie Fisher also star.

 

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) – The raw emotions and crackling dialogue of Tennessee  Williams’ 1955 Pulitzer Prize-winning play rumble like a thunderstorm in this film version, which is filled with fiery performances and grown-up themes that made it one of 1958’s top box-office hits. Paul Newman earned his first Oscar® nomination (Best Actor, 1958) as troubled ex-sports hero Brick. With a performance that marked a transition to richer adult roles, Elizabeth Taylor earned her second nomination (Best Actress, 1958) as Maggie the Cat, painting a vivid portrait of passionate loyalty.

 

Lassie Come Home /National Velvet

Lassie Come Home (1943) – Is there a better dog in all Yorkshire? Every day, Lassie waits for Joe (Roddy McDowall) outside school. One day she isn't there and Joe learns the terrible news: Lassie's been sold by his impoverished family. Eleven-year-old Elizabeth Taylor plays Priscilla, who understands Lassie more than the adults do and helps her escape kennel captivity.

 

National Velvet (1944) –In her star-making role, Elizabeth Taylor plays Velvet Brown, a wide-eyed adolescent who trains Pie, a horse she won in a raffle, for the Grand National Steeplechase with the help of her jockey pal (Mickey Rooney). Superbly directed by Clarence Brown and written by Theodore Reeves and Helen Deutsch, this exciting winner of two Academy Awards® (1945, Actress in a Supporting Role, Anne Revere and Film Editing) costars a young Angela Lansbury and veteran Donald Crisp.

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: ELVIS PRESLEY DOUBLE FEATURE

 

Jailhouse Rock (1957) –The King, Elvis Presley, plays Vince Everett, jailed for manslaughter after a bar fight. There, Vince learns to belt out tunes instead of saloon patrons and, after being paroled, follows a bumpy road to music and movie success.

 

Viva Las Vegas (1964) – Rev up your engines for 1964’s hottest duo as Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret race ’n’ roll in the fun capital of America. In one of his most popular movies, Elvis is racecar driver Lucky Jackson, who arrives in town with his car literally in tow.

 

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: DORIS DAY DOUBLE FEATURES

 

Please Don’t Eat the Daisies/The Glass Bottom Boat

Please Don't Eat the Daisies (1960) – Kate Mackay (Doris Day) has four boys who someday may lend their names to hurricanes, a monstrosity of a country fixer-upper that needs its lower fixed too and a poison-pen, drama-critic hubby (David Niven) who sees plays under the worst possible circumstances – by being in the audience.

 

The Glass Bottom Boat (1966) – Doris Day entered her eighth consecutive year as a top-10 box-office star when she boarded The Glass Bottom Boat, a hilarious blending of a romantic comedy and the era’s burgeoning spy-movie genre. Day plays Jennifer, a Girl Friday at a hush-hush aeronautics think tank. When colleagues suspect she’s an espionage agent, Jennifer chaotically sets out to clear her name.

 

On Moonlight Bay / By the Light of the Silvery Moon

On Moonlight Bay (1951) – Doris Day and Gordon MacRae team for spoonin’, croonin’ and swoonin’ On Moonlight Bay, from Jack Rose and Melville Shavelson’s script based on Booth Tarkington’s stories. The love birds hear wedding bells ahead, just as soon as Bill gets his sheepskin. But World War I rages “over there.” And Papa (Leon Ames) rages at home after a flap with his prospective son-in-law. Will peace return to this Hoosier home?

 

By the Light of the Silvery Moon (1953) – Young lovers Day and MacRae return in a moonlit sequel to On Moonlight Bay. Rosemary DeCamp, Mary Wickes and Billy Gray rejoin them in this remembrance of World War I-era Americana. There’s a new array of nostalgic standards: Day and MacRae spin through the Winfield kitchen to “Ain’t We Got Fun”, Day crows to “King Chanticleer” at a stage pageant, and the whole town laces up ice skates for the title-tune finale.

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: STARS & STRIPES COMEDY DOUBLE FEATURE

 

Mister Roberts (1955) – The USS Reluctant carries cargo along World War II’s forgotten Pacific seaways. Beyond the horizon, the real war passes by its stir-crazy crew. Directed by John Ford and Mervyn LeRoy from a script by Frank Nugent and Joshua Logan, this is the story of men fighting to survive not war’s dangers but its indignities. Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon, James Cagney and William Powell star in one of our most truthful war sagas.

 

No Time for Sergeants (1957) – Georgia farm boy Will Stockdale is about to bust with pride. He’s been drafted. Will’s ready. But is Uncle Sam ready for Will? Andy Griffith is certifiably funny in the role that clinched his stardom. Wearing a friendly wide grin, he ambles into the U.S. Air Force - and lots of folks will never be the same. They include pint-sized Ben (Nick Adams), big-city bruiser Irving (Murray Hamilton) and a jittery aptitude tester (Don Knotts). Finally, there’s Sgt. Orville King (Myron McCormick), an old-timer driven crazy by Will’s gee-whiz efforts at friendship. Breezily directed by the veteran Mervyn LeRoy from a screenplay by John Lee Mahin.

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: WWII DOUBLE FEATURE

 

Battle of the Bulge (1965) – Five months after D-Day, most American soldiers think the German army is broken. The Germans think otherwise. In an attempt to buy time to fill the skies with their invincible new jets, they launch one fast, furious offensive: the Battle of the Bulge. For this epic re-creation of one of World War II’s most crucial confrontations, director Ken Annakin directing from a script by Philip Yordan, captures the explosive action of massive forces squaring off, as well as the brave, individual ingenuity of weary GIs trying to survive a cruel European winter.

 

Battle Cry (1954) – A guitar-picking good ol’ boy. A clean-cut all-American. A Navajo. A bookworm. A lumberjack. A slum kid. All enter Marine boot camp to be trained, hardened and ready to answer their country’s Battle Cry. Scripted by Leon M. Uris from his own novel, directed by action master Raoul Walsh and starring a who’s who of ‘50s movie stars, the film is an epic ode to World War II Marine heroism and home-front sacrifice, a saga that follows recruits from boot camp to a New Zealand base of operations to the war they knew would someday come their way: the bloody invasion of Saipan.

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: FRANK SINATRA DOUBLE FEATURE

 

Ocean’s 11 (1960) – New Year’s Eve in Las Vegas. Roulette wheels spin, cards snap, slots chime, the shows go on… and the lights go out. It’s the perfect time to steal a kiss or a $25 chip. But for Danny Ocean and his ten partners in crime, it’s the perfect moment to steal millions. Frank Sinatra and off-screen pals Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford, Joey Bishop and more play army buddies who devise a scheme to knock out power to the Vegas strip, rig five casino vaults and raid them all in the same instant. Packed with glamour, suspense and comedy, this heist film from producer/director Lewis Milestone and writers Harry Brown and Charles Lederer is one of the all-time great capers.

 

Robin and the Seven Hoods (1964) – In Robin and the Seven Hoods, director Gordon Douglas and writer David R. Schwartz mirthfully give the Robin Hood legend a Depression-era, mobtown Chicago setting. There, North Side boss Robbo (Frank Sinatra) hopes to get a leg up in his power struggle with rival racketeer Guy Gisborne (Peter Falk). Robbo sets himself up as a latter-day Robin Hood with philanthropic fronts enabling him to scam the rich, take his cut and then give to the poor.

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: JOHN WAYNE DOUBLE FEATURE

 

Fort Apache (1948) – The soldiers at Fort Apache may disagree with the tactics of their glory-seeking new commander. But to a man, they’re duty-bound to obey – even when it means almost certain disaster. John Ford presents roughhouse camaraderie, sentimental vignettes of frontier life and massive action sequences staged in Monument Valley to explore the West’s darker side.

 

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949) – A masterpiece of mood and heroics, this second film in director John Ford’s renowned cavalry trilogy, written by Frank Nugent and Laurence Stallings, features one of John Wayne’s most moving performances, as a cavalry officer in his final week of service on the frontier. Under makeup aging him some 20 years, he inhabits the role of a wily veteran who knows the sting of war and vows to make his last mission one of peace. A 1949 Oscar®-winner for its color cinematography, the film shows the ritual of outpost life, the sweep of battle and the advance of the patrol beneath ominous skies, painting a memorable portrait of honor, duty and courage in the finest tradition of the cavalry.

 

 

TCM GREATEST CLASSIC FILMS: ALFRED HITCHCOCK DOUBLE FEATURE

 

North By Northwest (1959) – Cary Grant is the screen’s supreme man-on-the-run in his fourth and final teaming with Master of Suspense Alfred Hitchcock, who directed from a screenplay by Earnest Lehman. Grant plays a Manhattan adman plunged into a realm of a spy (James Mason) and a mysterious beauty (Eva Marie Saint) who are variously abducted, framed for murder, chased and, in a signature set piece, crop-dusted. He also hangs for dear life from the facial features of Mount Rushmore’s presidents.

 

Strangers on a Train (1951) – Tennis star Guy Haines (Farley Granger) half-jokingly muses about killing his wife with a stranger he meets on a train, unhinged playboy Bruno Anthony (Robert Walker), who’d prefer his father be deceased. In theory, each could murder the other’s victim. Crisscross. No motive. No clues. No problem. Except Bruno takes the idea seriously, in this thriller written by Raymond Chandler and Czenzi Ormonde.

 

Order Information:

Street Date: April 29, 2014

Order Due Date: March 25, 2014

SRP: $12.97 SRP for each collection

 

CALAMITY JANE / SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS

MAT: 1000416726

PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES /GLASS BOTTOM BOAT, THE

MAT: 1000416724

FORT APACHE / SHE WORE A YELLOW RIBBON

MAT: 1000416731

BIG SLEEP, THE / KEY LARGO

MAT: 1000416733

MISTER ROBERTS / NO TIME FOR SERGEANTS

MAT: 1000420464

ON MOONLIGHT BAY / BY THE LIGHT OF THE SILVERY MOON

MAT: 1000419766

BUTTERFIELD 8 / CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF

MAT: 1000419762

BATTLE OF THE BULGE / BATTLE CRY

MAT: 1000419764

LASSIE COME HOME / NATIONAL VELVET

MAT: 1000419936

 

JAILHOUSE ROCK / VIVA LAS VEGAS

MAT: 1000420477

 

 

OCEAN'S 11 (1960) / ROBIN AND THE SEVEN HOODS

MAT: 1000420889

 

 

NORTH BY NORTHWEST / STRANGERS ON A TRAIN

MAT: 1000420458

 

 

 


 

Ronald J Epstein
Home Theater Forum co-owner

 

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#2 of 7 OFFLINE   RLane777

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Posted February 26 2014 - 07:17 PM

Some of those look pretty good. Will they be exclusive to Wal-mart as some of them were before?


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#3 of 7 OFFLINE   classicmovieguy

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Posted March 16 2014 - 03:48 PM

Amazon has them all on pre-order...  Good selection, I enjoy these TCM packs.



"When I get a little money, I buy movies.  If there is some left over I'll attend to utilities and groceries".
 
My DVD and Blu-ray collection - http://classic-movieguy.dvdaf.com/

 

 


#4 of 7 OFFLINE   David Steigman

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Posted March 16 2014 - 09:05 PM

These sets are cool but they are just milking the same movies over and over again. Many of us are hoping for a Bogart/Bacall blu ray set...and have the original 4 DVD set.. The Hitchcock titles are more of the same also...



#5 of 7 OFFLINE   classicmovieguy

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Posted March 16 2014 - 11:39 PM

I appreciate that a lot of OOP titles (like "Butterfield 8", the June Allyson "Little Women" and Lauren Bacall's "Designing Woman") have been brought back into active service.  But yes, the same films over and over becomes a bit tiring.



"When I get a little money, I buy movies.  If there is some left over I'll attend to utilities and groceries".
 
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#6 of 7 OFFLINE   AlanP

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Posted March 18 2014 - 03:57 PM

Milk the same cow over and over how  many different releases of these tired titles !!! They should be more daring and release "MAME/AUNTIE MAME" on a collection and several others.  Warner's must have morons making these lame decisions !!!



#7 of 7 OFFLINE   classicmovieguy

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Posted March 20 2014 - 12:06 AM

Simply catering to what they think will sell the most units... the 'average Joe'... 



"When I get a little money, I buy movies.  If there is some left over I'll attend to utilities and groceries".
 
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