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Anyone else a bit creeped out that Google is buying Nest?


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#1 of 11 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted January 14 2014 - 11:30 AM

I understand that privacy is pretty much non-existent in the modern world, but the fact that Google the ultimate data collector bought a company that makes devices that are always on in the home makes me concerned.  Am I overreacting?  Would you buy always on Google devices?  Even with Android, you can turn your phone off, but you aren't going to turn off tstats, light switches and other devices....

 

Google will pay $3.2 billion to buy Nest Labs, which develops high-tech versions of devices like thermostats and smoke detectors, in its most expensive acquisition ever.

The search engine operator was an early investor in Nest Labs. It says the company's Nest Learning Thermostat has been a "consistent best-seller."

The thermostat, which retails for $249, is designed to learn how inhabitants like their homes to be heated and cooled. Once it learns the consumers' preferences, it automatically adjusts the temperature on its own.

The Nest Protect alarm is intended to be less annoying than traditional alarms: when it detects rising smoke or carbon monoxide levels, it lights up yellow and speaks with human voice, giving consumers an option to turn the device off if there is no emergency. They can stop the alert by waving an arm. The Nest Protect costs $129 while an older smoke and carbon monoxide detector could cost $50 to $80.

Analyst Shyam Patil of Wedbush Securities said Google is positioning itself to offer products that work on the "Internet of Things" - specifically a "connected home" full of intelligent wireless devices that collect data and could be controlled with a smartphone. Last year Google introduced Chromecast, a device that lets users connect their TVs and mobile devices.   http://news.msn.com/...?ocid=ansnews11

 



#2 of 11 ONLINE   schan1269

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Posted January 14 2014 - 11:36 AM

Taking battery out of pho....

#3 of 11 OFFLINE   Aaron Silverman

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Posted January 14 2014 - 11:37 AM

The "Internet of Things" is the hot new buzzword that isn't going to go as far as analysts and techies would like to believe. The average consumer is not interested enough in an online toaster or a "learning" thermostat to pay a premium for that sort of thing.


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#4 of 11 OFFLINE   Sam Posten

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Posted January 14 2014 - 04:39 PM

I mostly agree with you Aaron, but I do like this take on it:
http://www.mondaynot...emotes-problem/

Solve the problem of related devices talking to each other without human intervention and people WILL flock to it, I believe.

Now do I think Google has it within them to solve it? Not sure! Microsoft? NO FRIGGING WAY! Do I think Apple does? Probably yes!

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#5 of 11 OFFLINE   Adam Gregorich

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Posted January 15 2014 - 08:18 AM

I'm just seeing a world where I start seeing ads for long underwear/insulation or AC services depending on what Google learns from my Tstat....



#6 of 11 ONLINE   Cameron Yee

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Posted January 15 2014 - 09:15 AM

Spoiler

One thing leads to another at cameronyee.com

#7 of 11 OFFLINE   MattPriceTime

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Posted January 15 2014 - 09:58 AM

I'm not that surprised. I've long since accepted some of our brilliant minds of today see the next frontier as being things that make us lazier....you know until the power goes out.


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#8 of 11 OFFLINE   DaveF

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Posted January 15 2014 - 07:55 PM

Your house is burning down, and the smoke alarm will shout ads for fire extinguishers...

The "Internet of Things" is the hot new buzzword that isn't going to go as far as analysts and techies would like to believe. The average consumer is not interested enough in an online toaster or a "learning" thermostat to pay a premium for that sort of thing.


I think if the auto-programming works well, saving people money and making their home more comfortable, it will sell. And technology gets cheaper; these prices can drop to be quite affordable.

But the first problem is that the system doesn't seem to work especially well. At least not based on the scattered reviews I've read. I was seriously considering buying a Nest, but I don't have confidence that it will make my life better.

As for the google purchase: data about my household temperature seems inconsequential compared to my emails they've got. I'm not sure what to make of this, but I don't have strong negative feelings to it.

#9 of 11 OFFLINE   Edwin-S

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Posted January 16 2014 - 01:30 AM

These two old videos still feel completely relevant.

 


"You bring a horse for me?" "Looks like......looks like we're shy of one horse." "No.......You brought two too many."

#10 of 11 OFFLINE   Colin Davidson

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Posted January 16 2014 - 07:47 AM

Adam - I share your concerns about the purchase and was going to put a Nest thermostat in my house to better manage the HVAC system that was installed about 6 months ago. Given this news it is highly doubtful now that I will get a Nest device.

 

I know of other companies that have a similar thermostat system available but haven't really researched them.

 

Anyone have thoughts or recommendations of the others available?



#11 of 11 OFFLINE   Aaron Silverman

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Posted January 16 2014 - 11:05 AM

If there's another one worth getting, then Google will probably snap them up too eventually.
"How wonderful it will be to have a leader unburdened by the twin horrors of knowledge and experience." -- Mr. Wick




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