Jump to content



Sign up for a free account to remove the pop-up ads

Signing up for an account is fast and free. As a member you can join in the conversation, enter contests and remove the pop-up ads that guests get. Click here to create your free account.

Photo
- - - - -

Orphan Black Season 2


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
75 replies to this topic

#61 of 76 OFFLINE   TravisR

TravisR

    Studio Mogul



  • 22,335 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 15 2004
  • LocationThe basement of the FBI building

Posted July 10 2014 - 07:23 AM

^ What makes it even worse is that Robin Wright got nominated and she isn't even on a TV show (it's a web series). Nice to see Lizzy Caplan get nominated though.



#62 of 76 OFFLINE   KevinGress

KevinGress

    Supporting Actor



  • 655 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 24 2005

Posted July 10 2014 - 08:56 AM

^ What makes it even worse is that Robin Wright got nominated and she isn't even on a TV show (it's a web series). Nice to see Lizzy Caplan get nominated though.

 

While I believe that Tatiana deserves an Emmy and more, House of Cards is certainly more than a web series; it's a highly produced program.  I'd even be willing to say that Netflix has more quality programming that the CW right now.  



#63 of 76 OFFLINE   Hanson

Hanson

    Producer



  • 4,461 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 01 1998
  • Real Name:Hanson

Posted July 10 2014 - 09:03 AM

I have no quibble with Netflix racking up Emmys. But who cares about Downton Abbey anymore? That show went downhill after season 3, but Emmy voters are like, "Ooh, it's English so it must deserve an Emmy". Pfft.



#64 of 76 OFFLINE   TravisR

TravisR

    Studio Mogul



  • 22,335 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 15 2004
  • LocationThe basement of the FBI building

Posted July 10 2014 - 09:17 AM

While I believe that Tatiana deserves an Emmy and more, House of Cards is certainly more than a web series; it's a highly produced program.  

I don't intend any slight or shame when I say that House Of Cards is a web series. It's an excellent show that is better than virtually everything that is on TV but since it doesn't air on network TV or cable, it's not a TV show.


  • Josh Steinberg likes this

#65 of 76 OFFLINE   KevinGress

KevinGress

    Supporting Actor



  • 655 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 24 2005

Posted July 10 2014 - 09:23 AM

I have no quibble with Netflix racking up Emmys. But who cares about Downton Abbey anymore? That show went downhill after season 3, but Emmy voters are like, "Ooh, it's English so it must deserve an Emmy". Pfft.

 

:)  I guess Orphan Black isn't English enough!


  • Mark Walker and TravisR like this

#66 of 76 ONLINE   Josh Steinberg

Josh Steinberg

    Screenwriter



  • 2,717 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 10 2003
  • Real Name:Josh Steinberg

Posted July 10 2014 - 09:55 AM

I don't intend any slight or shame when I say that House Of Cards is a web series. It's an excellent show that is better than virtually everything that is on TV but since it doesn't air on network TV or cable, it's not a TV show.

 

I agree. 

 

In the case of House Of Cards, another thing worth noting is that it isn't even released like a typical series, with a new episode every week -- all episodes were released simultaneously, making it more of a super-long movie or a mini-series than an actual series.  It's an entirely different viewing experience when the viewer never has to wait a week to find out what happens next.  That may not make a difference for awards consideration, but I think it changes the way people or pop culture responds to a show.  As an example of more typical distribution, "Breaking Bad" aired its final episodes over a two or three month period, one per week.  In the hours and days following each episode's airing, there were numerous bits of press coverage of each episode.  People talked about it at work, people talked about it online, and everyone waited to find out what would happen each week and to discuss what they just saw and what they thought was coming next.  With a series like "House of Cards" the audience doesn't get to experience each episode on its own, and it seemed like the show exited the pop culture dialogue a week or two after it was released.  In terms of its media coverage, how long it was a topic of conversation, the way the press responded to it, the way people spoke about it, it really felt like it was being treated as one giant movie and not a series.

 

It doesn't seem right to judge a webseries where the entire whole is produced before a single piece is revealed against shows where the showrunners have to keep the entire enterprise afloat from week to week, where they're writing, shooting and editing all at once, and where there's feedback from the public as the story goes on.  Sometimes the show's interaction with the public causes the show itself to change -- there are probably many examples of shows where a guest character becomes a series regular because of how well it went over with an audience, as well as examples where recurring or main characters were dropped because they didn't go over well with the audience or turned out to be redundant to the plot.  (As an example of the first, I'm thinking of Ben Linus from "Lost" - Michael Emerson was signed to do three episodes but they loved him so much he ended up sticking around for the rest of the series.)  As an example of the third, I'm thinking of Mandy, Moira Kelly's character, being dropped after season one of West Wing -- her character contributed nothing to the show and didn't seem to serve any function.)  There are probably also examples of shows where a plotline was sped up or abandoned because the audience ended up getting there ahead of the showrunners, or was otherwise unnecessary or the writers changed their idea because it didn't work.  (An example of that might be "Fringe" where it's revealed towards the last part of the first season that there is an alternate/parallel universe.  The writers had originally planned on dragging that reveal out for several years, and realized that it was both more interesting that what had been their main story, and that the audience was ready to figure it out anyway.)  I feel like, for all three shows I mentioned, they would have been weaker had those adjustments not been made.  And if they were making the shows all in one batch and dumping all the episodes at once, there might never have been the chance for the showrunners to stop and realize that the shows could be improved by making adjustments to their original plan.  For all of the things a Netflix show (or a show delivered all at once like Netflix) can offer, I feel that's an important part of what the medium of television is that gets lost.


  • TravisR likes this

#67 of 76 OFFLINE   Cameron Yee

Cameron Yee

    Executive Producer



  • 10,655 posts
  • Join Date: May 09 2002
  • Real Name:Cameron Yee
  • LocationSince 2006

Posted July 13 2014 - 09:11 PM

Twenty dollars is a great price for the Blu-ray.
One thing leads to another at cameronyee.com

#68 of 76 OFFLINE   KevinGress

KevinGress

    Supporting Actor



  • 655 posts
  • Join Date: Aug 24 2005

Posted July 14 2014 - 02:11 PM

... That may not make a difference for awards consideration, but I think it changes the way people or pop culture responds to a show.  ...

 

I think that's the key sentence - but you actually have it in reverse.  The audience, or pop culture as you reference it, has changed and tv shows have responded.  People like to binge watch nowadays.  They let shows build up on their DVRs and wait until some weekend and then blow through them.  To avoid commericals, but also to avoid the wait between; age of instant gratification.

 

But you make a good observation about shows like House of Cards and because a whole season is released at once, it doesn't seem to resonate in the public's conscience like Breaking Bad, or say, Orphan Black does.  But one could also argue then that it's really earned its nominations then to be able to have such quality that it sticks out in the committee's minds.

 

I say House of Cards is a television show just as much as Orphan Black - the only difference is the carrier.  And I'd be pretty confident saying that the vast majority of people owning a DVR/PVR more than a couple months has binged watched a television show.   

 

I think, in time, Tatiana and the show will get the accolades they deserve; in fact, it's conversations like these that will keep the show in pop culture's mind :) and will bring it about, sooner rather than later. 


  • Josh Steinberg likes this

#69 of 76 ONLINE   Josh Steinberg

Josh Steinberg

    Screenwriter



  • 2,717 posts
  • Join Date: Jun 10 2003
  • Real Name:Josh Steinberg

Posted July 14 2014 - 02:25 PM

I think that's the key sentence - but you actually have it in reverse.  The audience, or pop culture as you reference it, has changed and tv shows have responded.  People like to binge watch nowadays.  They let shows build up on their DVRs and wait until some weekend and then blow through them.  To avoid commericals, but also to avoid the wait between; age of instant gratification.

 

Maybe I do.  I'm probably an odd duck to use as an example of what people at large do… over the years, I've tried to binge watch my favorites by saving them up on the DVR, but I've never made it more than a couple weeks… just can't wait.  Oddly enough, when House Of Cards came back, I eagerly watched the first episode of the second season, and but still haven't watched the rest of them.  Have to get back to that at some point.


  • TravisR likes this

#70 of 76 OFFLINE   TravisR

TravisR

    Studio Mogul



  • 22,335 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 15 2004
  • LocationThe basement of the FBI building

Posted July 14 2014 - 02:44 PM

We're a million miles off topic but I hate 'binge watching' simply because a serialized TV show is supposed to be seen in a serialized way. The anticipation and the waiting are part of the fun. However, the worst part is the loss of discussion about the show and the fandom that that helps build. Part of the reason that I have such fond memories of watching Breaking Bad, Lost, 24, etc. is because I spent years talking about those shows with people in the real world and online each week. When I watched House Of Cards, I spent three or four days watching each season and it's excellent but I couldn't talk about it with anyone because they had only seen episode X and I wouldn't spoil upcoming shows for them. With no one being on the same page, it kills an essential element in keeping people's interest in a TV Show. I guarantee that that's going to be a huge hurdle for TV shows in the future because people connect far more with a show that they watch and discuss for a few months every year over a show that they watch and discuss for a few days and then basically forget about for the next 51 weeks.


  • Josh Steinberg likes this

#71 of 76 OFFLINE   jcroy

jcroy

    Screenwriter



  • 1,028 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 28 2011

Posted July 14 2014 - 03:19 PM

In the case of House Of Cards, another thing worth noting is that it isn't even released like a typical series, with a new episode every week -- all episodes were released simultaneously, making it more of a super-long movie or a mini-series than an actual series.  It's an entirely different viewing experience when the viewer never has to wait a week to find out what happens next.  That may not make a difference for awards consideration, but I think it changes the way people or pop culture responds to a show.  As an example of more typical distribution, "Breaking Bad" aired its final episodes over a two or three month period, one per week.  In the hours and days following each episode's airing, there were numerous bits of press coverage of each episode.  People talked about it at work, people talked about it online, and everyone waited to find out what would happen each week and to discuss what they just saw and what they thought was coming next.  With a series like "House of Cards" the audience doesn't get to experience each episode on its own, and it seemed like the show exited the pop culture dialogue a week or two after it was released.  In terms of its media coverage, how long it was a topic of conversation, the way the press responded to it, the way people spoke about it, it really felt like it was being treated as one giant movie and not a series.

 

 

We're a million miles off topic but I hate 'binge watching' simply because a serialized TV show is supposed to be seen in a serialized way. The anticipation and the waiting are part of the fun. However, the worst part is the loss of discussion about the show and the fandom that that helps build. Part of the reason that I have such fond memories of watching Breaking Bad, Lost, 24, etc. is because I spent years talking about those shows with people in the real world and online each week. When I watched House Of Cards, I spent three or four days watching each season and it's excellent but I couldn't talk about it with anyone because they had only seen episode X and I wouldn't spoil upcoming shows for them. With no one being on the same page, it kills an essential element in keeping people's interest in a TV Show. I guarantee that that's going to be a huge hurdle for TV shows in the future because people connect far more with a show that they watch and discuss for a few months every year over a show that they watch and discuss for a few days and then basically forget about for the next 51 weeks.

 

Lately I've been "binge watching" through the original Dallas.  Despite being a 30+ year old show, so far I've been finding it's almost like "binge watching" through Netflix's "House of Cards" in overdrive on steroids.  Even with all the artificial "mini cliffhangers" where the commercials were originally inserted, and the cliffhangers between episodes and/or seasons (such as the infamous "Who Shot JR?").

 

I didn't really watch the original Dallas, but have been watching the revived Dallas.  So this is all "new" to me.

 

Similar to what Travis has discussed, I couldn't really speak to anybody about the original Dallas.  In my local social circles, people largely have no clue what the original Dallas was about.  For that matter, not really any online message boards where people are excited to talk about the original Dallas episodes.



#72 of 76 OFFLINE   Adam Lenhardt

Adam Lenhardt

    Executive Producer



  • 14,395 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 16 2001
  • LocationAlbany, NY

Posted July 15 2014 - 04:46 PM

For anybody on the fence about picking up the Orphan Black Season Two Blu-Ray (currently $19.99 at Best Buy and Amazon), HTF's own Cameron Yee has posted his review.

Edited by Adam Lenhardt, July 15 2014 - 04:46 PM.

  • Mark Walker likes this

#73 of 76 OFFLINE   Adam Lenhardt

Adam Lenhardt

    Executive Producer



  • 14,395 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 16 2001
  • LocationAlbany, NY

Posted October 16 2014 - 04:56 PM

Production has commenced on Season 3. BBC America's press release follows:

BBC AMERICA’s Critically-Acclaimed Original Series Orphan Black Begins Production on Series Three
Published: October 16, 2014

Tatiana Maslany and Ari Millen square off for an explosive new season

Toronto October 16, 2014 – Production has begun on the third season of BBC AMERICA’s Peabody Award-winning series Orphan Black. The conspiracy thriller (10 x 60) stars award-winner, Tatiana Maslany, who returns to her unprecedented lead role as multiple clones. The critically-acclaimed, action-packed series that sparked an inspired fan base named Clone Club, unveiled new and more treacherous enemies in season two.  But it was the finale that shocked viewers when it introduced a male line of clones, raising more complex questions that left viewers on the edge of their seats. Orphan Black is produced by Temple Street Productions in association with BBC AMERICA and Bell Media’s Space.

Maslany played five recurring characters throughout season two including British street-wise chameleon Sarah, suburban soccer-mom Alison, cosmic-thinking scientist Cosima, Ukrainian wildcard Helena and ruthless pro-clone Rachel. In addition, she raised the bar by taking on the roles of Transgender clone, Tony, and sick and dying clone, Jennifer. Maslany continues to earn critical accolades including two Critics’ Choice awards and her first Golden Globe© nomination.

“Season two of Orphan Black not only doubled its audience, it also treated fans to double the number of clones,” says Perry Simon, General Manager, BBC AMERICA.  “Our network’s commitment to creating long-lasting original programming that hooks viewers and never lets them go is perfectly illustrated through this buzz-worthy series.”

Season three plunges the clone sisterhood into unexpected territory with the realization that they’re not alone.  Just when they thought they knew their enemies and allies, season three reveals our clones are more vulnerable than ever before. Highly trained, identical male-soldiers raise more questions than answers. Who are these new clones? Who created them? And more importantly, why do they exist?   Sarah, Cosima, Alison and Helena are stronger together than they are apart, but this season will put that bond to the test.  Will they forge towards their truth, or fall at the feet of those who seek to control them?

Returning in a lead role is Ari Millen, who plays the newly discovered male clones – Mark, the Prolethean cult follower and Rudy, a prisoner of war. Also back this season is Jordan Gavaris as Sarah’s fiery foster brother Felix, Dylan Bruce as Paul, an army officer working for secret forces in the clone world, Maria Doyle Kennedy as Sarah and Felix’s duplicitous foster mother Mrs. S, Kristian Bruun as Donnie, Alison’s husband, Evelyne Brochu as Dyad Scientist and Cosima’s lover Delphine, Kevin Hanchard as Art, a detective caught in the clone trap, Michiel Huisman as Cal, father to Sarah’s daughter Kira (Skyler Wexler) and Zoé De Grand Maison as Gracie, a Prolethean escapee.  Additional casting for the series will be announced in the coming weeks.

“We are incredibly proud and delighted to be commencing production on season three of Orphan Black,” commented David Fortier and Ivan Schneeberg, executive producers of Orphan Black and Co-Presidents of Temple Street Productions.  “We’ve been fortunate to work with one of the best cast and crews in the business for the last two seasons. We could not be happier about the success of the show and how it continues to be embraced by audiences around the world.”

“We are thrilled to be underway on another season of the gripping original series Orphan Black with our wonderful partners Temple Street Productions and BBC AMERICA,” said Corrie Coe, Senior Vice-President, Independent Production, Bell Media. “After the shocking finale of Season 2, we are excited to share with our viewers the next dramatic twists and turns in the clone conspiracy, as conceived by series creators Graeme Manson and John Fawcett.”

BBC AMERICA’s Orphan Black became the first ever ad-supported drama series to double its ratings from season one to season two in A25-54 and 18-49 in Live+7.The original series is co-created by Graeme Manson and John Fawcett, with Manson also serving as writer and Fawcett as director. The international hit series is distributed by BBC Worldwide and can be seen in more than 170 countries. The first two seasons are currently available on Blu-ray and DVD and via digital download on all partner platforms.  Season one is available for live streaming through Amazon Prime. For more information on where to catch up on Orphan Black, visit www.bbcamerica.com/orphanblack.

Orphan Black is shooting in Toronto through March 2015 and returns on BBC AMERICA in Spring 2015.

* Source: Nielsen Media Research

 

BBC AMERICA delivers U.S. audiences high-quality, innovative and intelligent programming. Established in 1998, it has been the launch pad for talent embraced by American mainstream pop culture, including Ricky Gervais, Gordon Ramsay, Graham Norton, and successful programming formats including ground-breaking non-scripted television like Top Gear and top-rated science-fiction like Doctor Who. Owned by BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the BBC, BBC AMERICA has attracted both critical acclaim and major awards including four Emmy® Awards, five Golden Globes® and 12 Peabody Awards. The channel attracts one of cable’s most affluent and educated audiences and is available on cable and satellite TV in 80 million homes. It broadcasts in both standard and high-definition, with content available On Demand across all major digital platforms. Online, www.BBCAmerica.com is the place to go to dig deeper into pop culture with a British twist. Find out more by visiting www.Press.BBCAmerica.com/ or follow us on www.twitter.com/BBCAMERICA.


  • Mark Walker and TravisR like this

#74 of 76 OFFLINE   Adam Lenhardt

Adam Lenhardt

    Executive Producer



  • 14,395 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 16 2001
  • LocationAlbany, NY

Posted November 08 2014 - 10:26 AM

This show has the best teasers. The first one for Season 3:


#75 of 76 OFFLINE   Adam Lenhardt

Adam Lenhardt

    Executive Producer



  • 14,395 posts
  • Join Date: Feb 16 2001
  • LocationAlbany, NY

Posted November 25 2014 - 06:09 PM

Per the BBC America press release, some additional casting for Season 3:
 

BBC AMERICA’s Critically-Acclaimed Original Series Orphan Black Adds To Cast
Published: November 25, 2014

Justin Chatwin, James Frain and more join the clone drama

TorontoNovember 25, 2014 – BBC AMERICA, in association with Space and Temple Street Productions, announced casting additions to the new season of Orphan Black. Justin Chatwin (Shameless) and James Frain (Intruders) join the channel’s hit original drama for its third season, which is currently in production and set to return in 2015.

Justin Chatwin joins in a recurring role as Jason Kellerman. With rugged good looks and street-smarts, Jason is a savvy drug-dealer in the guise of a charismatic businessman.  James Frain guest stars as Ferdinand, a well-educated, “cleaner” who is both charming and intimidating. Ferdinand is a powerful player in a secretive, multi-national political faction that operates with questionable ethics and a ruthless approach.

Also joining the cast this season is Ksenia Solo (Black Swan) as Shay, a soulful and compassionate holistic healer with a great sense of humor destined to become a new friend to Cosima Niehaus (Tatiana Maslany).  Kyra Harper (Warehouse 13) will play Dr. Coady, a ruthless doctor and advisor to the military. Coady is outwardly the soul of reason, but her maternal, nurturing manner conceals an agenda that even her superiors do not suspect.  And rounding out the additions is Earl Pastko (Murdoch Mysteries) as Bulldog, Ferdinand’s silent, imposing and violent personal bodyguard. Communicating with his boss by looks only, Bulldog carries out the dirty work of his shady employers.

Starring Golden Globe® nominee Tatiana Maslany in multiple roles, Orphan Black’s second season brought new enemies to light, culminating in a shocking finale which revealed a new line of male clones, played by Ari Millen. Season three plunges the clone sisterhood into unexpected territory with the realization that they’re not alone.

The original series, co-created by Graeme Manson and John Fawcett, with Manson also serving as writer and Fawcett as director, is produced by Temple Street Productions. The international hit series is distributed by BBC Worldwide and can be seen in more than 170 countries. The first two seasons are currently available on Blu-ray and DVD and via digital download on all partner platforms.  Season one is available for live streaming through Amazon Prime.

For more information on where to catch up on Orphan Black, visit www.bbcamerica.com/orphanblack.

Orphan Black is shooting in Toronto through March 2015 and returns on BBC AMERICA in 2015.
 

BBC AMERICA:
 

BBC AMERICA delivers U.S. audiences high-quality, innovative and intelligent programming. Established in 1998, it has been the launch pad for talent embraced by American mainstream pop culture, including Ricky Gervais, Gordon Ramsay, Graham Norton, and successful programming formats including ground-breaking non-scripted television like Top Gear and top-rated science-fiction like Doctor Who. A joint venture between BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the BBC, and AMC Networks, BBC AMERICA has attracted both critical acclaim and major awards including four Emmy® Awards, five Golden Globes® and 12 Peabody Awards. The channel attracts one of cable’s most affluent and educated audiences and is available on cable and satellite TV in 80 million homes. It broadcasts in both standard and high-definition, with content available On Demand across all major digital platforms. Online, www.BBCAmerica.com is the place to go to dig deeper into pop culture with a British twist. Find out more by visiting www.Press.BBCAmerica.com/ or follow us on www.twitter.com/BBCAMERICA.



#76 of 76 OFFLINE   Lou Sytsma

Lou Sytsma

    Producer



  • 5,357 posts
  • Join Date: Nov 01 1998

Posted December 01 2014 - 12:29 PM

Well here's hoping they tighten the show up in the third season and return the show to the excellent first season form.  Too many storylines in the second season. And too many that fizzled out or turned out to dead ends.  'Tony' was a backfire - looked so bad.

 

Lot of great, but ultimately unconnected, moments this season. I'm hoping the show narrows it focus and goes back to what the strength of the show was - especially the relationship between Sarah and Fi.

 

Not hopeful considering all the cast additions they've already announced.


Every man is my superior, in that I may learn from him.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users