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Epson 5020 vs Benq w7000?


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#1 of 22 Doublestar

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Posted October 23 2013 - 08:45 AM

These appear to be my best options given my Parameters of price (under 3000), throw ratio (2.0 or more), and 3d. After 7years my Benq 8720 bit the dust (loud crack as the color wheel Shattered). So I want a modest upgrade.
I've read the reviews but not seen the 5020 or 7000 in action. Please I need opinions From those who have seen them. Thanks. PS: if the 5020 look best I may wait for the 5030.
Bob

Edited by Doublestar, October 23 2013 - 08:53 AM.


#2 of 22 schan1269

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Posted October 23 2013 - 08:52 AM

If you currently have DLP. Stick with DLP. If you switched to a LCD projector, you'd kick your own ass.



#3 of 22 schan1269

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Posted October 23 2013 - 08:59 AM

Look at the Mits 7900 as well. There isn't much in the $1500> <$3000 DLP range. But between the W7000 and HC7900 you can't go wrong.

 

Most people who buy DLP and go over $3000 get D-ILA.

 

Since JVC has pushed the price barrier down, the DLP "market" has shrunk. But there is no way a person interested in picture quality picks a LCD projector over DLP or D-ILA. Unless they need greater placement flexibility of LCD.

 

But at every price point...

 

DLP...

Better contrast

Better color

Better motion control

 

LCD...

Placement flexibility



#4 of 22 Doublestar

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Posted October 23 2013 - 09:04 AM

That's what I thought 7 years ago. The Benq was the clear winner over LCD back then particularly re: sharpness, clarity and light level. But haven't the lcd's caught up since then and clearly won the black level war? How important is black level anyway?
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#5 of 22 schan1269

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Posted October 23 2013 - 09:11 AM

LCD has never, and will never, win any "black level war".

 

It will never win against a plasma TV(however much longer they survive in the market). Once OLED comes along, plasma and LCD are dead anyway.

 

LCD that compete in price against JVC lose everything except brightness and placement flexibility. Take the Panny AE8000 though...

 

It has the edge over JVC if...

 

1. your room isn't completely light controlled.

2. Going for a sumo-size screen.(130" +)

3. Want to avoid 1.2> screen gain



#6 of 22 Doublestar

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Posted October 23 2013 - 01:42 PM

Thanks for your advise Sam. As regards other choices neither the Mitsubishi nor the Panny will fit my room according to the pro calculator at ProjectorCentral. I need a 20 ft throw to a 120inch wall that's been treated with as I recall a special paint called Goo. It's handled my 8720's 1000 lumens fairly well all these years so it should do much better with the 7000's 2000 lumens, even in 3D. Not so sure it could handle JVC's 1300 lumens in 3D. The Epson's 2400 lumens should also be no problem, even at 20 feet. The thing about Epson is its winning black level which all the reviews say it has, at least for projectors under $3500. But then back to my Q about black levels. If its only good for movies with lots of black in them then that would probably only affect maybe 10 percent of my viewing overall. If it affects other sources then I need to know.
Bob

#7 of 22 Jim Mcc

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Posted October 23 2013 - 03:49 PM

I would go with the Benq W7000. The Epson 5020 is not bright enough for your 20' throw and 120" diagonal screen. It will only give you 13 foot lamberts. The W7000 will give 19 foot lamberts.

If you can shorten your throw distance, you will have more projector options.

#8 of 22 Doublestar

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Posted October 24 2013 - 08:02 PM

Thanks Jim...
  Can I ask how you got to the Fl figures?  All I was going on was the pro calculator and several comments from reviewers:

ProjectorCenter.com
 "in Cinema mode, the W7000's 909 lumens and the 5010's 827 lumens are
functionally the same, as differences that small cannot be seen except when
using a meter. In 3D, the W7000 splits the difference between the 5010's 3D
Dynamic and 3D Cinema modes when it comes to brightness. Both projectors
rank among the top projectors for 3D brightness, regardless of price. "

At cinema mode in 2D, ProjectorCenter figured 16 Fl for the BenQ, and 11 Flin 3D.  I didn't find similar Fl figures for the Epson, but if the Cinema lumens are 82 lumens apart, I'm guessing it would drop the Epson Fl levels to justabout 10% less than the BenQ levels.
Bob

 



#9 of 22 Type A

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Posted October 25 2013 - 02:50 AM

Welcome to the forum Bob :)

 

Excellent observation.  The difference between published max and best calibrated are very often completely disregarded resulting in misleading or just plain incorrect calculations from the very beginning.  Its a misconception thats even more popular among LCD fans. 


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#10 of 22 Dave Upton

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Posted October 25 2013 - 05:19 AM

Bob, Please don't get the Epson!

 

I've seen both in use and the W7000 absolutely destroys the Epson in sharpness and overall pop. I'd pick it over the Epson regardless of application.



#11 of 22 Jim Mcc

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Posted October 25 2013 - 02:17 PM

Thanks Jim...
  Can I ask how you got to the Fl figures?  All I was going on was the pro calculator and several comments from reviewers:
Bob

 

I got the foot lambert numbers from Projectorcentral.com. You choose the projector, then click on "Calculator Pro". Then you choose your throw distance and screen size, and it shows you the foot lamberts. Unless noted otherwise there, they are based on the bulb set to high power mode.

 



#12 of 22 Doublestar

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Posted October 25 2013 - 02:42 PM

I've decided to go with benq w7000. The sharpness and brightness are the big factors and the price is sinking like a rock with word of a new w7500 coming out, though we don't know when. And no one's given any reason how black level affects normal TV viewing or how it even does much for movies except fot really dark scenes.
Thanks for your comments.
Bob

#13 of 22 schan1269

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Posted October 25 2013 - 02:49 PM

No one is giving reasons how black levels affect viewing(media type of said content is irrelevant)...???

 

Greater contrast(again, ANSI...not the BS propagated for marketing purposes) allows greater color rendering.

 

The common misconception of "greater contrast" is it means "better black".

 

That is half the story. Greater white is the other half of the story. Better white and better black allow better color.



#14 of 22 Dave Upton

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Posted October 25 2013 - 03:00 PM

I've decided to go with benq w7000. The sharpness and brightness are the big factors and the price is sinking like a rock with word of a new w7500 coming out, though we don't know when. And no one's given any reason how black level affects normal TV viewing or how it even does much for movies except fot really dark scenes.
Thanks for your comments.
Bob

I have the older W6000,  and black levels are more than sufficient. Some iris pumping, but with the DI tweaked it's rarely noticeable. The 7k improves on that noticeably and adds 3D. I think you'll be very happy  :lol:



#15 of 22 Doublestar

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Posted October 25 2013 - 10:11 PM

So Sam, do well built LCDs inherently have both better black and white levels than DLPs, giving them better contrast and thus better color? I can see where you'd notice a difference in "pop" where white or black areas abut colors. The colors would stand out more next to pure black or white, making them "seem" to be more vibrant. But that wouldn't make the red or green intrinsically any redder or greener would it? Or on the other hand do the black/white levels actually alter the pigmentation of the colors themselves?
Still moderately confused about black levels---Bob

#16 of 22 schan1269

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Posted October 26 2013 - 06:19 AM

LCD has poorer black level performance. Have no idea where you got the opposite.

Greater contrast leading to better color has been a a cornerstone of film since the first picture was taken 150-odd years ago with a box camera and flash powder.

#17 of 22 Doublestar

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Posted October 27 2013 - 06:22 PM

My throw is 20 ft to a 120" treated wall in a "cave" with very low ambient light. I'm looking for anyone with similar long throws using a benq w7000 in 3d. Is there enough light? Livolsi claims 1100 lumen in 3D but another review calculated just 3fl in 3d. What's the real story from someone using it that way?

#18 of 22 Stephen_J_H

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Posted November 01 2013 - 11:45 AM

According to the throw calculator on BenQ's website, your throw is shorter than average for a 120" screen, so brightness should be really good.


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#19 of 22 Jim Mcc

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Posted November 01 2013 - 12:27 PM

Livolsi claims 1100 lumen in 3D but another review calculated just 3fl in 3d.



Did he say what his throw distance was and screen size? That's very important,

#20 of 22 Gregg Loewen

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Posted November 01 2013 - 01:15 PM

is that measured with or without the glasses in the light path of the meter ?


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