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long run CATV just over 500ft


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#1 of 7 OFFLINE   Xinder

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Posted October 20 2013 - 03:49 PM

Hello all.

Need a little advice about line and such on a 500+ foot run of CATV.

 

I looked into having one of the contractors our cable company gave us but both estimates are up near $1000 and I can't afford and wouldn't anyways even if I could.

 

I have 2 existing poles up with hangers.  They split the distance in roughly 1/4's.

 

I was told the type of line that they figured had to be used, but it was over a year ago and I forget now.  I do know that I couldn't seem to find it here anywere (BC, Canada) and to get the line overseas was difficult.

 

However, after some research and some logical thinking I have a few questions and 2 possible solutions.

 

One thing I heard was that RG11/u would be the line to use.  I can get a aerial RG11/u cable for $200. It's 1000ft but that ok I guess.  Would this line need a booster to go the 500 or so feet without alot of signal loss?

 

The second idea I had was to run simple RG6,steel line, and a power line to the first or second pole and then mount a signal booster for the rest of the run.  (I know a bit of a hackey way to do it but..  lol)

 

Cost is obviously a issue and I know there is certainly a "Right Way" to do it but I highly doubt I can afford it soo...  lol

 

Any help you all can give me would be great.

 

Thanks.



#2 of 7 OFFLINE   coyoteboy

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Posted October 20 2013 - 04:06 PM

Hello all.
Need a little advice about line and such on a 500+ foot run of CATV.

I looked into having one of the contractors our cable company gave us but both estimates are up near $1000 and I can't afford and wouldn't anyways even if I could.

I have 2 existing poles up with hangers. They split the distance in roughly 1/4's.

I was told the type of line that they figured had to be used, but it was over a year ago and I forget now. I do know that I couldn't seem to find it here anywere (BC, Canada) and to get the line overseas was difficult.

However, after some research and some logical thinking I have a few questions and 2 possible solutions.

One thing I heard was that RG11/u would be the line to use. I can get a aerial RG11/u cable for $200. It's 1000ft but that ok I guess. Would this line need a booster to go the 500 or so feet without alot of signal loss?

The second idea I had was to run simple RG6,steel line, and a power line to the first or second pole and then mount a signal booster for the rest of the run. (I know a bit of a hackey way to do it but.. lol)

Cost is obviously a issue and I know there is certainly a "Right Way" to do it but I highly doubt I can afford it soo... lol

Any help you all can give me would be great.

Thanks.

Can't you run a directional high gain WiFi antenna pair? Cables over that length are going to be a pain as you're finding.

#3 of 7 OFFLINE   Xinder

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Posted October 20 2013 - 06:43 PM

Can't you run a directional high gain WiFi antenna pair? Cables over that length are going to be a pain as you're finding.

...

ahhh.  sure.

I am assuming that this is a component that you plug the Coaxial into, transmit via WiFi, recieve and turn back into a Coaxial line.

 

I did a google search on "directional high gain WiFi antenna pair" and didnt really come up with anything that had a coaxial relevance so I assume that its commercial name is something different.

The only concerns that I would have is that this is Digital Cable and would be running Internet.  I don't know if an actual physical bi-directional connection is required for it to work or not.



#4 of 7 OFFLINE   coyoteboy

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Posted October 20 2013 - 06:59 PM

I may have crossed wires on your purpose. Are you using cat v to transmit in a format other than normal networking traffic?

#5 of 7 OFFLINE   coyoteboy

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Posted October 20 2013 - 07:05 PM

If you're transmitting data between two actual networks and can use wifi other than the range issue, check places like eBay for yagi antenna. You need suitable wifi hardware (removable antenna) and careful aiming but it should function bidirectionally with one at each end.

#6 of 7 OFFLINE   Xinder

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Posted October 20 2013 - 10:27 PM

No.

This is the main line of the digital cable TV off the road.



#7 of 7 OFFLINE   schan1269

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Posted October 21 2013 - 06:40 AM

Now that we know what you are doing.

OTA, Dish, Directv, analog cable and digital cable all require different gain at the receiving end. I don't know the digital cable loss per 100ft. I do know Directv's.

Directv loses 2.7 over 6 and 2.4 over 11.

If digital cable is close to that, you'll need a drop amp. Cost of your drop amp will determine whether you use 6 or 11. As too much gain, you'll need to use 6.

So let us assume you'll have a 3db loss per 100. You need a 15db drop amp. Now find the frequency your cable uses to determine if you need 6 or 11.




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