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Recommended amplifier/receiver for stereo 250 watt Pro Audio Studio Monitors


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4 replies to this topic

#1 of 5 buyabook

buyabook

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Posted September 26 2013 - 11:47 AM

Hello 

 

I am looking for an amplifier/receiver to connect my computer to both my studio monitors to play mp3s/movies off my computer through an spdif out or an HDMI out or standard 7.1 3.5 mm. jacks.  I would prefer a digital output seeing as I don’t want to lose on sound quality.

There are two studio monitors.  They are of the Pro Audio brand. The monitors have a tweeter horn, midrange woofer diameter of 6 inches and 12 inch diameter woofer on the bottom.  The front plate has the following information on it:

 

1.      power 250 watts program

2.      min pwr 5 watts

3.      nominal impedance 8 ohms

4.      sensitivity 95 dB 1W/1M

5.      Digital Ready

6.      Liquid Cooled

 

I could not find a model number on these speakers.  I also cannot tell if these speakers are of high quality.

 

Can you please recommend an appropriate amplifier to fulfill this purpose that will help me experience the true potential of these studio monitors? Looking at how big that woofer is, I feel the bass is not reaching its through potential and I am hoping there is something I can buy to improve overall sound quality.  For the past 5 years, they have been connected to a panasonic sahe75  5.1 receiver that outputs 100 watts per channel. I want a worthwhile upgrade that can show me what I’ve been missing.

 

Also, can  I gain any significant improvement in sound quality if I purchased a higher quality amplifier (Yamaha rxa -730) or a NAD stereo receiver compared to my current receiver (Panasonic SAHE75) that I bought for 300$ retail. 

 

 



#2 of 5 schan1269

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Posted September 26 2013 - 11:54 AM

Power isn't the problem. I have a Panny SA-HE200 of about the same power. It makes your ears bleed on whatever is connected to it. Granted that AVR is now used in the guest house with music only anymore...but...it has more than enough power.

 

Taking into account the efficiency of these, you need less than 4 watts to make yourself go deaf.

 

I think the main issue is these are probably PA speakers. IF so, that is why you don't like them.



#3 of 5 buyabook

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Posted September 26 2013 - 12:18 PM

they are passive speakers:

 

Here are some pictures: http://imgur.com/LTq...QKRQVYD,F2xscnJ



#4 of 5 schan1269

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Posted September 26 2013 - 12:29 PM

PA doesn't mean powered.

 

Public Address(which also includes DJ/club). Otherwise known as "not intended for home use".

 

Also those specs are almost meaningless.

 

Digital Ready? Speakers aren't digital. They are analog. Always have been, always will be.



#5 of 5 Mr645

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Posted October 13 2013 - 12:22 PM

If any of the specs are close to accurate, you will probably want at least 60 wpc to power them to good solid levels.  Pretty much any receiver will be plenty. Just go find something on sale that has the features you want. 

 

Since you aready have a  receiver, you would probably be better off upgrading the speakers before the receiver






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