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General Question - Frequency


Best Answer schan1269 , August 09 2013 - 07:14 AM

Upper and lower range means that the speaker is capable of producing those frequencies.

 

-3(some even go -2) is the norm used. 3db is "twice as loud". So...

 

-3 at 65hz means it is "half as loud" as its mean point(usually somewhere along 1khz).

 

Unless a manufacturer provides an actual graph(or you create your own with sine sweeps) it isn't of much help, other than setting your crossover in an AVR. Which this speaker could be set at 65 or 70(depending which choice your AVR gives you)...or left at 80.

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#1 of 4 erew99

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Posted August 09 2013 - 07:03 AM

Hey all,

I am still in the process of setting things up, and even though I already purchased some speakers, I have a question about frequencies.

 

Electrical Total Frequency Response 55Hz - 25kHz 

Upper -3dB Limit 24 kHz

Lower -3dB Limit 65 Hz

 

When reading this, what does Upper and Lower db limit mean?  How does this affect the total frequency response?

 

Thanks.


Edited by erew99, August 09 2013 - 07:04 AM.


#2 of 4 schan1269

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Posted August 09 2013 - 07:14 AM   Best Answer

Upper and lower range means that the speaker is capable of producing those frequencies.

 

-3(some even go -2) is the norm used. 3db is "twice as loud". So...

 

-3 at 65hz means it is "half as loud" as its mean point(usually somewhere along 1khz).

 

Unless a manufacturer provides an actual graph(or you create your own with sine sweeps) it isn't of much help, other than setting your crossover in an AVR. Which this speaker could be set at 65 or 70(depending which choice your AVR gives you)...or left at 80.



#3 of 4 erew99

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Posted August 09 2013 - 07:25 AM

Thanks Sam.  I think I got it.



#4 of 4 Robert_J

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Posted August 09 2013 - 01:43 PM

Electrical Total Frequency Response 55Hz - 25kHz 

Upper -3dB Limit 24 kHz

Lower -3dB Limit 65 Hz

The only thing that does not describe is the standard deviation from 65hz to 24khz.  We know it is -3 on the ends but are there any large valleys in the response somewhere in the middle or any large peaks?






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